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Upgrading a 1999 pc

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  • Homebuilt
  • Hardware
  • Pentium
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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January 27, 2009 3:35:05 PM

Yes, a 1999 pc. Um upgrading a old pentium 450. I love old hardware and i love to bring it back to day to day use and that's what im doing here. I have lots of old and more or less recent hardware laying around. Im going to tell the "short" story of my project, if i can call it that so if you want to skip it and go directly to my question, please read the second half of the thread.
I giving the best upgrade such computer from that age can have. I removed the old cpu and added a slot1\socket 370 converter, and then added the best pentium III intel ever did, a Intel pentium III-S Tualatin at 1400mhz, then i added a bunch of new\old things. Old meaning the sound card, a ISA Soundblaster 16bit bigger than a geforce280, that works perfectly for 2.0 audio. Next i added a usb 2.0 pci adapter card with 5 usb 2.0 ports, a tv card, a pci\sata controler with a 160 gb hdd, and then my old trusworthy geforce 3 ti200 128mb gold edition overclocked to higher clocks than a geforce 3 ti500 which allows me to play doom3 reasonably well (although i'm still looking for the best 3.3v agp card i can get, and there is a 7600gt like this but its way too expensive), and when it comes to ram, i added 1gb (4x256mb) sdram, and here is when the problem kick in, because two of the memory sticks only read half, therefore 128mb, so my question is...




For all hardware oldschoolers, is there any way around to make a old board ( SOYO Slot 1 SY-6BA+ ) that usually only reads 16 chips on each stick, to read instead only 8?

Thanks in advance!

More about : upgrading 1999

January 27, 2009 6:13:41 PM

I should have posted this on the mobo\memory section, sorry for that.
Anyway, Is this a tricky question?

I would really like to have some feedback on this! thanks ^^
a b B Homebuilt system
January 27, 2009 9:56:46 PM

Oh wow.... brings back some memories. As for the RAM problem I don't know.
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January 27, 2009 10:13:58 PM

If we are going for a trip in the way back machine let me break out my Voodoo 5 5500.
January 28, 2009 6:26:41 AM

I have one of those too, still inside it's original box.
a b B Homebuilt system
January 28, 2009 10:31:53 AM

Some boards would read double sided memory, some would not.
You had to be sure and get the right memory, or it simply wouldn't work.
January 28, 2009 10:54:35 AM

Thank you. Well, the ram was given, although it is like new!

Not that it will help much on getting a definitive awnser, but the motherboard correct model is SOYO Slot 1 SY-6BA+IV


I know that this sounds odd to many of you, but being entusiasth about computers can go both ways, like loving the newest tech over the old and the acomplishments that the computer industry does over the last generation, and the other side of the coin, enjoy old hardware.
I love this particular hardware because this is the type of computer (slot-1\socket 7 like) that marked a particular time in my life, it provided my lot's of fun back then, online, lan and even offline!

I'm just nostalgic, but i bet that many people here feel the same!
January 28, 2009 11:23:28 AM

Well after jumping into the "Way Back Machine" with Mr. Peabody and Simon I uncovered the answer ........ There are number of different memory types available in the market, some of the most popular memory types are based on 4 bit, 8 bit, 16 bit, and 32 bit design for the memory modules. SOYO motherboards (unless specified otherwise) can only recognize 8 bit memory modules. If a 4 bit memory (also known as high density memory) is placed on the board the system will only be able to recognize half the memory. For example if a 512MB high-density(4 bit) memory is placed on a board that does not support that memory. the memory will only read as 256MB. So.. the answer is that you need to get 8 bit modules to utilize the full capacity of 1GB of memory that your motherboard will support.

There is no work-around or fixes for this issue as it is built into the motherboard / bios limitations.

The max video card that I know of is the Geforce4 ti-4600 that you can use in that AGP 2X slot.... although you can use perhaps a "faster" pci card the limitations of the PCI bus @33Mhz will not give you better results...... look on EBay for a card... they go cheap there.

The answer was on a piece of paper stuck between my old Conner "fat 40" 40 Mb hard drive and the shoebox sized 512 Mb hard drive that I paid over $2500 for....... Wayyyyyyyyyy Back!

Good luck on the build
January 28, 2009 12:21:14 PM

Thank you a lot for the help. I got confused when CPU-Z readed 1024 mb, but that could be some read from the micro-code inside the rams and not the memory that the system is actually using!

As for the card, there are some 3.3v agp card like these :

http://img.hexus.net/v2/graphics_cards/nvidia/galaxy/20...

/7600gs and 7600gt, and yes i know that it would very handicaped on that system, but what gives, it's a old card anyway, so who cares as long as i can push the max out of the system!
January 28, 2009 12:34:12 PM

You are correct... CPU-Z queries the memory while the motherboard / bios lays down the law on what it will accept.....
January 28, 2009 4:19:40 PM

How about a 9800Pro from eBay, or a Geforce 5900XT or 6600 256MB. Good luck with your build, I appreciate your 'uncommon' kind of enthusiast view.
January 28, 2009 10:22:08 PM

Thank you for the advices. Some friends of mine actually gave to me two ati9700pro and one 9800pro....but guess what, i was unlucky enough for each one of them to be damaged in a different way.

Anyway, thank you for the input, i'll check on those.
!