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Can I use a magnetic screw driver?

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January 28, 2009 11:06:42 AM

Can I use a magnetic screw driver to screw in the MO or is this a bad thing?

More about : magnetic screw driver

January 28, 2009 11:14:08 AM

I'm not sure about that but I heard that you should be more worried about static electricity though cuz it has bad effects on some of the components.

Ok. checked this website http://lifehacker.com/software/macgyver-tip/keep-screws... and most of the comments said dat its okay to use magnetized screw driver as it takes a more powerful magnet to damage the components inside
January 28, 2009 11:37:39 AM

Thanks
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January 28, 2009 11:43:36 AM

I use one, never had a problem.
January 28, 2009 11:45:34 AM

While I think care is always required, I've used magnetic screwdrivers for twenty years without issues. I wouldn't rest it (or its bits) on top of a hard drive, but I don't think you'll have any problems.
January 28, 2009 12:42:32 PM

Onus said:
While I think care is always required, I've used magnetic screwdrivers for twenty years without issues. I wouldn't rest it (or its bits) on top of a hard drive, but I don't think you'll have any problems.

+1

I've also used magnetic screwdrivers on quite a few builds without issues. Just be careful and don't directly touch any components (especially the HD).
January 28, 2009 12:48:34 PM

I haven't had any problems using one , even for screwing in HD's and such....I mean just don't leave it on top of the hd...or use to to poke around in the PSU or something XD
But they are handy for getting screws that fall out, so yeah your fine just don't be stupid.
January 28, 2009 1:18:11 PM

Another + for the magnetic screwdrivers :-)

Never had issues.
January 28, 2009 2:01:23 PM

I would never dare use one just in case. Fook wrecking high-end components.

Its the same reason I wear a anti-static wrist band, sure you can do it without one, but I feel better wearing it.

Why tempt fate?
January 28, 2009 2:37:15 PM

I agree with Merlin. I am not particularly worried about static electricity, but I do not use magnetic tools anywhere near anything that I would regard as sensitive to magnetic tools; eg. floppy drives, Jazz drives, and hard drives.

Why temp fate.
January 28, 2009 3:03:31 PM

I don't use magnetic tools so agree with other two post you can do lots of stuff to discharge static and wearing all cotton clothing is a must for me working inside my case. poly's and lots of other synthetics can produce static but using magnetic tools I worry about touching something it shouldn't and I'm very unlucky to say the least anyway.
January 28, 2009 3:04:57 PM

I'd always heard not to use a magnetic screwdriver when mounting a HD. At work I have put this warning/theory to the test on numerous occasions with no lost hard drives or data. When working on my own personal rig? I do avoid using magnetic screwdrivers... maybe I'm being overly cautious. What can I say? I hate to RMA stuff.
January 28, 2009 3:22:46 PM

n using magnetic screwdrivers when building computers for 20 years. Never had a problem. You can definately use it safely. Just keep it away from floppy disks that are missing their covers. (If by some odd chance you still use those)
January 28, 2009 3:41:48 PM

I as well have never had a problem using a magnetic screwdriver, and actually prefer using one. Makes keeping small screws under control a lot easier than a regular screwdriver (I have huge hands, so these small computer parts are getting more difficult...).

I'm pretty sure the magnetic field from your hard drives is far more powerful anyway.
January 28, 2009 3:49:39 PM

I use a #2 phillips head screwdriver all the time. Get one 4 to 6" long with just a 1/4" long magnetic tip. It is very useful to position screws in the motherboard if you have fat fingers.
Just be careful. Don't keep it mear any magnetic parts like the hard drive.
January 28, 2009 4:52:13 PM

I've been using magnetic screwdrivers for many years now with absolutely no problems. I can't even stand to have to work on one now without it being magnetic. Yes, even on the hard drive.

One day I had a friend's hard drive sitting on my desk and my daughter came up and stuck a high powered magnet right on the top of it (not running). I freaked out thinking I was going to have to buy a new drive for my friend and apologize profusely for losing his data, but when I hooked it back up it was perfectly fine.
January 28, 2009 5:08:50 PM

hard drives are far better sheilded than most people think. That doesn't mean you should put magnets near them for fun, however it does mean that a magnetic screwdriver that can't even pick up a drive screw from more than .5mm and normally requiers contact to do even that is not going to hurt them. It is very safe to use the magnetic screw driver and if it saves you from dropping even one screw that wold then contact the MB and grounds it will have been well worth it. I think it is more risky to work without it (what if you drop a screw and bend a cap or something trying to get that screw back you could easily be screwed. (no pun intedned)
January 28, 2009 5:21:04 PM

Onus said:
While I think care is always required, I've used magnetic screwdrivers for twenty years without issues. I wouldn't rest it (or its bits) on top of a hard drive, but I don't think you'll have any problems.


QFT!
+ 2

January 28, 2009 6:21:26 PM

Well I would watch it though lots of motherboards have chokes or coils on the board waving a magnet across a coil of wire does produce electric current. Probably not enough to hurt anything but I would watch very carefully where you wave the magnetic screwdriver just to be safe anyway. They also make screwdrivers with grab hooks on the end to hold the screw in place.
January 28, 2009 11:20:35 PM

+1 for magnetic screw drivers being safe, the magnet in them is pretty weak
January 29, 2009 4:08:42 AM

All hard drives have enough magnetic sheilding to get by, when magnetic tools are used. Infact, Hard drives have some EXTREMELY powerful magnets in them in the first place, that controls the arm. Infact, I've torn apart older drives for these magnets, so I can rest them in the bottom of the box I keep my screwdrivers in. :p 

And since the hard drive is your only magnetic sensitive part in 99% of consumer computers, you have absolutely nothing to worry about.
January 29, 2009 7:25:13 AM

:lol:  I didn't know Home Depot sold them.
January 29, 2009 10:28:15 AM

Feel free to use whatewer skrewdriver you can :)  so weak magnetic fileds won't do ever problems or failure in your mobo's circuits
January 29, 2009 11:08:58 AM

I've been building comptuer for some time now too. I'm in the crowd that does use magnetic screw drivers. Like noted earlier, the magentic field a screw driver creates will not overpower the sheilding and magentic field generated by the hard drive(most devices for that matter). I think your better off using it vs taking the chance of dropping screws. Dropping screws and trying to get them out can be quite a pain and can damage the board if your not careful. Now if for some reason your hard drives are opened up and exposed then i'd keep the screw driver away but at that point most likely the hard drives are damaged anyways.

There's two risks. 1) the magentic field from your screw driver will overpower your hard drive and damage it. 2)You stand a good chance of dropping screws. I'd say stick with preventing opition 2.
September 1, 2010 12:24:10 PM

does anybody have a Comptia A+ certified view on this. I'm taking the test in a couple of months and wonder what the official answer will be
November 23, 2010 2:48:51 AM

I believe they say not to because they say that the magnetism can induce currents in conductors and burn out components without your knowledge. I disagree but that is what my 1000 page CompTIA study guide says.
November 23, 2010 3:02:23 AM

Firefly TW said:
does anybody have a Comptia A+ certified view on this. I'm taking the test in a couple of months and wonder what the official answer will be



You should consider trying cram and get lucky on it early. If you get it before 2011, you will be certified for life, if you get it during 2011 you will need to get re certified once every 3 years. As far as I know, there is no penalty for failing (besides losing the test fee, not too cheap either) If you're reading this site, chances are you know enough to pass. When in doubt, choose the answer that seems the safest pick. It's all multiple choice with some questions having multiple right answers, lol

Edit: was looking at a few sample questions for it, saw this gem and completely lost it reading answers c and d

6.You have recently changed the CMOS password and now you have forgot that. In this case, What should you do?
a)Install the CMOS shorting jumper to erase the CMOS data
b)Enter the CMOS program and reset or erase the password
c)Find a machine that does not use password protection
d)Keep trying different password combinations
November 23, 2010 10:39:43 AM

D HAS WORKED FOR ME IN THE PAST.........lol
!