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E5200 bottleneck gts 250

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April 28, 2009 12:49:27 PM

does my intel e5200 at 2.5 ghz bottleneck my gts 250? I have them on an EVGA 680I SLI. Also what is the best way to OC the e5200 on this mobo?
a b à CPUs
April 28, 2009 1:30:31 PM

It's been proven on this site and others, that to get the most out of your video card, regardless of what CPU you have, CPU speed has to be 3ghz or above, settling around 3.6 - 3.8ghz range.

You'll want to change all your voltages to their lowest stable settings. Then raise the QDR slowly from 800mhz --> 960mhz, that should get you to 3ghz.
a b à CPUs
April 28, 2009 6:18:51 PM

Get an aftermarket cooler. It doesn't have to be a crazy cooler, just something that will do the job. The C2D's run pretty cool themself, they just need something better than stock. The Arctic Cooler Freezer 7 Pro is one of the best values for the core2. 3203 people can't be wrong. I had one and it was a GREAT cooler. And Flyin15 is right. a 3GHz CPU will run a GPU much better. not that it wont work now.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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April 28, 2009 6:39:19 PM

I have the e5200 on an Asus 750i motherboard. Just chaged two settings in BIOS and it took me 15 seconds to overclock it to 3.3 GHz at 12.5 multi X 266 fsb or 1066 quad pumped. I left everything else in Auto and the motherboard runs the e5200 at 1.2 vcore which is amazing for this kind of overclock! And the temps stay the same as on stock speed too which is nice work by the Artic Pro Freezer 7.
April 28, 2009 8:40:12 PM

flyin15sec said:
It's been proven on this site and others, that to get the most out of your video card, regardless of what CPU you have, CPU speed has to be 3ghz or above, settling around 3.6 - 3.8ghz range.

You'll want to change all your voltages to their lowest stable settings. Then raise the QDR slowly from 800mhz --> 960mhz, that should get you to 3ghz.


Wrong way around, you overclock, then find the lowest stable voltage.
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April 29, 2009 3:49:52 AM

djcoolmasterx said:
Wrong way around, you overclock, then find the lowest stable voltage.


There is no right or wrong way. Some raise to the max voltage, then up their bus speed and/or multiplier. Others, like me just start at the lowest voltages, and work the voltage up as you increase bus speed and/or multiplier. Doesn't matter how you overclock.

The end result is you stress tested the system and it is working without any problems.
!