Choosing XP 32bit or 64bit for a 64bit cpu.

So here's my situation. My current system has been running solid for 5 years.

Abit NF7-S Rev 2, AMD 2500+ Barton O/C'd to 3200+, 2GB of Corsair XMS DDR. I run Tiny XP Rev 9 on it.

So today I'll start building my new system which will consist of the following below. Now I'd like to go with XP 64bit and take advantage of the processor's power but I've heard of people having tons of app installation issues, etc. I can run 32bit, but I'll feel I wasted all this $ for nothing.

ASUS P5N-D Mobo
Intel E8400 Core 2 Duo Processor - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115037
4GB Corsair XMS2

And now that I think of it 32bit only supports up to 3.5GB. So I guess XP 64bit? :cry:
16 answers Last reply
More about choosing 32bit 64bit 64bit
  1. 64-bit XP isn't supported very well. My vote is for 64-bit Vista.

    Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium SP1 64-bit for System Builders - OEM
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116488 $99.99
  2. Yep 64-bit vista. You'll not find any other recommendation around here ;)
  3. 64 vista and turn auto update off when installed and manually install updates. This is the key follow it!!!!
  4. Never had interest in Vista. Which Vista should I get, the Home, Ultimate? Do I want SP1? Which.

    I pretty much surf the web, photoshop, team fortress 2, warcraft 3, counterstrike source.

    BTW, thanks for the help.
  5. The version I linked above is very popular (Home Premium). It should do everything you need, and it's only $100. Here's a link that compares the different versions:

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-vista/compare-editions/default.aspx

    Yes, you should get SP1. There were some major improvements in it.
  6. If you already own a copy of XP/32 it's perfectly fine to use that. The RAM limitation isn't a significant factor. 3GB RAM for XP/32 is every bit as good as 4GB & Vista/64.

    If you have to buy your OS there is no advantage getting XP/64, and Vista/64 had definite advantages in driver support.
    Vista Home Premium 64 SP1 is the version you want. Vista versions compared
  7. I actually have a copy at work of XP 64 never used. My boss bought it for one of the new PCs and we never used it. I ended up throwing Windows 2003 Server on it. I should get that copy and experiment.
  8. XP 64 is a different animal with less driver support.
  9. If and ONLY if you have drivers and the NEED for XP x64 (ie CAD) should you get XP x64 (I use it for SolidWorks 2007 and Inventor) else get Vista x64 (Use this too)
  10. What is the difference between Vista system builders and just regular home premium?
  11. ^ System builders is OEM meaning no customer service from Microsoft. And it's supposed to be locked to one PC.
  12. So if I bought system builders and then bought another PC I could not install Vista onto my newer computer? Is it better to just pay the extra and get regular home premium? Also can you reinstall it over and over on the same PC in case of reformatting needs?

    Thank you
  13. liberona said:
    can you reinstall it over and over on the same PC in case of reformatting needs?
    Yes you can. And the "system builders/OEM" version should have no problems with major upgrades to it's original system. If the "major upgrades" included pretty much everything you'd essentially have a new system. MS usually has a fairly lenient definition of "upgraded system" for an individual/home user.

    OEM vs Retail; the retail version can be moved from system to new system to new system for as long as you want (just one system at a time though). OEM is locked to the same original system it's installed on.
    Usually an OEM version is good for the entire lifetime of a system, and by the time you're ready for a new PC build there is usually a good reason for moving to a new OS. I'm using the Windows 7 beta and I'm liking it a lot, so at this point in time I can't really recommend getting the retail Vista version.
  14. I read on the net that if your mobo craps out on you you cannot reinstall windows vista. Is this true? Thank you for the help
  15. I hate to be *one of those guys* but I had Vista x64...

    Device driver support was definitely perfect. So if this is a concern don't let that worry you much.

    I hated Vista though, my sidebar was useless after coming out of sleep mode. The computer ran much slower than I wanted. Many of my games weren't "as compatible" as they could have been. I found myself thinking many times, well this isn't so bad I can live with it and it will get better once I get used to the operating system itself. I had this thought A LOT, eventually I switched back to XP because I got tired of trading usability and performance.

    I do not have an older or slow machine. The pointless windows experience performance test gave me a very solid 5.9.

    I went through all of the performance tweaks as well, which is the first thing I do on my own system after a fresh install. Almost everything useless was disabled. In *my opinion* Vista is way slower for over-all responsiveness. Try it for yourself on the same machine, install Vista and XP, hopefully the next version of Windows is much better. I've been considering giving the beta a try. (I am very happy that Vista was a gift to me I didn't spend a dime on it)

    Please keep in mind I am comparing Vista x64 to XP x32. I have never tried XP x64. My opinion, wait for Windows7 and use XP now, you said you have a copy of it anyway. I have the 32bit installed with 4gb of ram and I never think twice about the 512mb that the OS cannot access.
  16. liberona said:
    I read on the net that if your mobo craps out on you you cannot reinstall windows vista. Is this true? Thank you for the help



    If your motherboard dies and you replace it with a different type or brand, then you might have to call MS to get a reactivation. Just explain that the old board died and they'll clear it.
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