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Post Problems

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July 5, 2009 8:47:45 PM

GA-P35C-DS3R
Intel E6750 Duo

I was altering the bios settings and by mistake I changed the CPU host frequency from 266 to 333Mhz!
Every time I try and boot now the pc powers up and then goes off after 5 seconds then powers up then goes off...., I have tried to reset CMOS via jumper and also removed the battery but I still get the same post problem.

The only time it does not do this is if I either remove the CPU or remove the CPU power plug from the Motherboard.

I suspect I have damaged either the CPU or the MB, but how do I find out which to replace?

Please help....

More about : post problems

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a b V Motherboard
July 5, 2009 9:18:44 PM

Can you get back into BIOS, in any way, to reload "Safe Defaults"?
July 5, 2009 9:20:50 PM

No it will never post, it has power for around 5 secs then reboots
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a c 177 V Motherboard
July 5, 2009 9:27:19 PM

Is it possible that in your recent exploits, that you might have somehow stressed or struck the heatsink/fan assembly? The first symptom of a bad thermal interface, usually a cracked, broken, or incompletely locked pin, is it powers up momentarily, can't 'spill' sufficient heat to the sink, overheats, and dies due to thermal shutdown; without a good thermal interface, this takes a very surprisingly short time - on the close order of two to five seconds... Best way to check is to flip the MOBO, allowing you to closely examine the pins/locks.
July 5, 2009 9:29:16 PM

No it has failed without me even opening the case, as I said I was in Bios and then this has happened. Right before that everything was fine :o 

After I removed the CPU I re-applied heatsink compound and remounted the CPU correctly so I dont think that is the problem.
a b à CPUs
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July 5, 2009 9:35:35 PM

I have had numerous people swear to me here that they're sure they did the HSF install correctly, and then sheepishly come back to report either a pin loose, unlocked, or cracked... It's not inattention or incompetence, either - there seems to be a contest going on (but I think Intel's system wins hands down with their really crappy 'stock' 775 piece) to see who can design the worst, most impractical way to attach a heatsink! I've tried a few, and, with one exception, they all stank! (The exception: I finally bit the bullet and went to water - have a D-Tek Fuzion, and it came with: an 'x' shaped, threaded, metal backing plate with reinforcing ribs and a molded-on foam rubber insulating pad, and a spring-loaded set of screws with a machined release [not a single &^%$ ^%#@ plastic piece involved!] that lets you get to exactly the correct tension, and then simply turns without tightening further; the drawback - you have to have unimpeded access to the back of the MOBO; I've written D-Tek and told them they should quit wasting their time on water-blocks, and sell mounting systems to every HSF manufacturer!)

IMHO, the best feature of GB's 'ultra-durable' MOBOs (which is, otherwise, a bunch of ditzy marketing hype - '50 degrees C cooler'? - I'm pretty sure that if anything on my MOBO was 50 cooler, there'd be frost forming on it!) is that they'll take enough pressure to get an HSF seated without giving you the ominous feeling that you're a half-ounce of pressure away from a dreadful, fatal snap! Another point to be made is procedure: it's usually easier to 'work your way' around the chip, but, for the best results, you want to do a pair of diagonally opposed pins first, and then finish up with the other two...
July 5, 2009 9:45:08 PM

It failed when I changed the bios settings which was even before I had opened the case, so no it is not a heatsink problem
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a c 177 V Motherboard
July 5, 2009 9:45:41 PM

Mind you, the defining characteristic here is that you describe it as 'going off' after the boot attempt - if it's just rebooting over and over, that's a different diagnosis, with different fixes/checkpoints; please advise...

Bill
July 5, 2009 9:46:32 PM

Yes it is rebooting over and over
July 5, 2009 10:01:46 PM

looks like i got the same problem, mine turned off while i was in windows typing.

Iam using A THERMALRIGHT 120 with the 1366 bracket and i made sure i tighend all the screws. i agree with you it might well be the heatsick becuse when i turn off the computer for a while longer sometimes i get further to boot screen then when i contunoiusly trun it on.
a b à CPUs
a c 177 V Motherboard
July 5, 2009 10:03:22 PM

First, we need to get into the BIOS, or, get a successful CMOS reset, which should break the cycle; one of the major causes of 'reboot loops' on the 'd' series boards is having plugged in a new (or actually, more often - old) USB device - I had one where the guy had a USB external backup drive plugged in forever, but not turned on - his daughter, unbeknownst to him, flipped the switch on it - instant reboot loop! The second cause is a BIOS setting: "Legacy USB storage detect" on the "Integrated Peripherals" page (some newer BIOS may also call this "USB Storage Function" - same fuctionality - same problems); you need to enable this if you're A - trying to boot from a USB device, or B - doing something in the BIOS which needs access to USB before the OS' drivers are loaded; at all other times you want it disabled - known cause of the dreaded 'GB reboot loops'... I have been told that on some boards you need to keep a jumper on the CMOS reset pins for, like, fifteen seconds; but I don't know if this is credible or not - a momentary pushbotton press has always done it for me! Another thing - you state you changed the host frequency to 333, but, if I'm reading right, your CPU should default to 333 (1333FSB); the initial "Load Optimized Defaults" should have taken care of this, barring a bad BIOS - what BIOS rev did it ship with?
July 5, 2009 10:07:00 PM

i manged to restore the bios. and get into bios and load the fail safe and the optimized settings. but i still have this problem.
a b à CPUs
a c 177 V Motherboard
July 5, 2009 10:26:39 PM

spider - for you, the first thing I'd recommend is to boot, do the <DEL> to enter the BIOS, go to the "PC Health Status" page, and watch your CPU temp; if it climbs and climbs, and then POW reset - it's likely the HSF (sounds silly, but another thing - does the HSF fan spin up?)
July 5, 2009 10:47:29 PM

ye offcourse
July 5, 2009 11:14:46 PM

OK this is not a new build, it has been running very well for over a year.
Nothing new was added, no new USB device.
Whatever caused it was from me in the BIOS settings, if I could only get to the bios I could load default settings, but it will not post!
July 5, 2009 11:23:12 PM

Just tried it again, had the CMOS battery out for around 2 hours started up and it still re-boots every 3 seconds, no beeps just keeps re-booting over and over.
a b à CPUs
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July 6, 2009 12:58:22 AM

Ackk! I think we're at the proverbial 'end of the rope' here; at this point, I think the best idea would be to find a local shop that can put in a POST card, like this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
which reads out a two-digit hex code that 'narrates' where in the POST you are, and what segment seems to be failing - and even that's iffy, as it may be impossible to see (the post segments happen pretty rapidly) where it's 'dying', as it's not 'hanging' somewhere in POST (which is much more common) - it's aborting, and starting over, so the last digits produced may only approximate where it's at... Another thing is to ask if they've some GB experience, because the POST codes aren't the easiest thing to come by, either; the only GB stuff I've seen (but I haven't done a thorough search, yet) are the ones they publish for the new x58 stuff with a built-in readout.
a b à CPUs
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July 6, 2009 2:22:17 AM

Check the Gigabyte forums, and/or post there. IIRC, I've seen posts about dealing with boot-loops.
July 9, 2009 12:38:24 PM

Just to update you all, in the end I RMAd the MB back to Gigabyte UK who turned it around in an amazing 2 days!!!

The fault was a BIOS data error which they have repaired free of charge, Yippee!

Thanks to all of the above for the advice and help, and thanks to Gigabyte

:bounce: 
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July 9, 2009 1:54:55 PM

Congrats! Nice to see Gigabyte come through for someone, once in a while. While your luck is hot, you may wanna buy a couple of lottery tickets!
July 9, 2009 3:09:04 PM

lol perhaps I will, cheers bilbat
July 11, 2009 2:52:16 AM

I just read this post because I am having similar issues with my EP45T-UD3P board. I updated the BIOS to F7 and since then every time I restart this machine it ends up going in an infinite loop before it even POSTS, just like Gazjoe was describing.

I thought it may have had something to do with the fact that I had downloaded and played with EasyTune the same day I updated the BIOS and that the software screwed something up in my overclocking settings, which may have effected my hardware, but seeing as how Gigabyte cited a "BIOS DATA ERROR" I'm starting to rethink my misfortune!

This is crap! I'm calling Gigabyte next week to get the story straight here.

BTW, I am using the computer that this issue is occurring on. By, turning the PSU OFF/ON I am able to boot without issue?! If I reset or turn the power off by front panel switch, shutdown or restart within Windows, it will fall into the boot loop. Strange days...

a b à CPUs
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July 11, 2009 3:40:14 AM

Have you checked Gigabyte support forums at Tweaktown for reboot loop problems?

http://forums.tweaktown.com/search.php?searchid=87066

In case that doesn't work for you, I used "UD3P reboot loop" (and "UD3P boot loop") as search parameters.
a b à CPUs
a c 177 V Motherboard
July 11, 2009 3:42:55 AM

Did you read this above?
Quote:
...one of the major causes of 'reboot loops' on the 'd' series boards is having plugged in a new (or actually, more often - old) USB device - I had one where the guy had a USB external backup drive plugged in forever, but not turned on - his daughter, unbeknownst to him, flipped the switch on it - instant reboot loop! The second cause is a BIOS setting: "Legacy USB storage detect" on the "Integrated Peripherals" page (some newer BIOS may also call this "USB Storage Function" - same fuctionality - same problems); you need to enable this if you're A - trying to boot from a USB device, or B - doing something in the BIOS which needs access to USB before the OS' drivers are loaded; at all other times you want it disabled - known cause of the dreaded 'GB reboot loops'...
July 11, 2009 4:57:57 AM

bilbat said:
Did you read this above?
Quote:
...one of the major causes of 'reboot loops' on the 'd' series boards is having plugged in a new (or actually, more often - old) USB device - I had one where the guy had a USB external backup drive plugged in forever, but not turned on - his daughter, unbeknownst to him, flipped the switch on it - instant reboot loop! The second cause is a BIOS setting: "Legacy USB storage detect" on the "Integrated Peripherals" page (some newer BIOS may also call this "USB Storage Function" - same fuctionality - same problems); you need to enable this if you're A - trying to boot from a USB device, or B - doing something in the BIOS which needs access to USB before the OS' drivers are loaded; at all other times you want it disabled - known cause of the dreaded 'GB reboot loops'...


I did read that but only half way followed through. Apparently its not good enough to simply disable the "USB Storage Function" in the BIOS. I went through each of my USB devices and discovered that my 256Mb MuVo slim MP3 player has been the root of all this trouble. Simply unplugged it and reset and everything is working fine now. Awesome.

Thanks the reminder bilbat!
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
July 11, 2009 5:07:40 AM

And bilbat saves yet another needless Gigabyte rma!
a b à CPUs
a c 177 V Motherboard
July 11, 2009 5:54:49 AM

Ka-ching!
July 11, 2009 10:23:57 AM

Happy Days!
a b à CPUs
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July 11, 2009 3:55:59 PM

Always welcome!

Bill
!