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Zalman CNPS10X Extreme and 4 RAM chips issue...

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a c 100 K Overclocking
August 12, 2010 8:22:12 PM

Hey everyone. Recently I decided I really wanted to upgrade to 8gb RAM on my i5 750, Asus P7P55D Pro. Reason being, playing STALKER: Call of Pripyat with 2 high res texture mods and the Atmosfear mod (adds weather effects and new sky boxes) my RAM usage went way up to 3.8gb with the rest of it cached. That caused HDD access while playing and significant slow down, at times equivalent to about 2 or 3fps. To me this is completely unnacceptable.

So, my Zalman CNPS10X Extreme is huge and in proper set up the fan covers the first RAM slot. I bought a Scythe Slipstream Slim 2000rpm fan in the hopes that it would still cool adequetly, but it doesn't. So, my only option is to flip the heatsink around, causing the fan the blow towards the front of my case - Antec 902. My temps, before doing all this, were about 75C absolute highest at 4ghz overclock. With the Scythe then hit 80C and I even attached the original Zalman fan overtop of it (bit of a mess, had to use black electrical tape since the holes didn't line up - the fan was touching the tops of the RAM sinks and therefore protruding about 1/2" from the top of the main heat sink). It didn't help temps - and the Scythe fan would spin up to 2500 RPM because the original Zalman fan was throwing a lot more CFM at it lol. It made a very whiney sound, which isn't good since I'm going for quiet. (Note: just finished adding new 5850 aftermarket heatsinks that are super quiet - Scythe Setsugens :D )

Anyway, when I flipped the heat sink around (and reattached the original fan), I also flipped the exhaust case fan around to blow air directly at the heat sink. Unfortunately my temps were still about 78/79C in this set up - however, I didn't do proper procedure in removing the old TIM and applying new stuff because my AS5 is running out. I only added a little drop. I also had a slight location issue when reattaching the heatsink so basically, pretty sure I can at this time conclude it'll hopefully drop down a few degrees by properly reattaching.

Here's the thing, obviously with the exhaust fan blowing in I'm screwing with my case flow. There is a top fan which I cranked up. But I also have my 2 5850s now blowing hot air towards the top of my case, and a side fan blowing on the GPUs so there's a lot of air hot air that needs to get vented. If I put the exhaust fan on properly, I'll have another issue with the heat sink fan sucking that hot exhaust air. So what do I do?

Options
a) flip zalman fan around for a pull config - not ideal. Would it help if I cover the sides of the heat sink so the intake air has to travel through the entirety of the heat sink (ie: no air coming in from the sides, which means more air over the cooling fins)
b) possibly make some sort of intake cowl... ???
c) somehow put the slim Scythe fan to use (possibly in conjunction with the cowl)

Sorry for the long winded post... just looking for some advice here.

I saw a 120 to 80mm converter... what if I stuck that on the back of the Zalman fan, then ran an 80mm duct (which would have to squish) towards the front of the case, and maybe stick the Scythe fan at the intake of that? lol... Times like this I wish I had a different cooler (even tho it does a good job)

Best solution

August 12, 2010 8:53:50 PM

The 80 mm convertor is a good idea, not only does it allow for a proper fixture, but it also helps concentrate the flow of air through your heatsink.
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a c 100 K Overclocking
August 12, 2010 9:13:06 PM

Hmm yeah but as I think about it, running some sort of duct is going to be really tough...

I've been looking at pull only configs and some people report only a 1C difference from push. Maybe a pull config and then I can somehow suspend the Scythe fan off the front as a push... add a shroud or something... hmm.
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a c 100 K Overclocking
August 13, 2010 3:44:31 PM

Well, I reseated the HSF. I can't flip the fan on it around due to the design (ugh!) so I tried flipping the wires to get it to run in reverse. Didn't work. Plugged it back in normally, and it works but it can't adjust the speed - something fried ><

Anyway, so I flipped the case's rear exhaust around and it helped drop the temps on the CPU by a couple degrees. So now the HSF is working fine, but with the rear turned into an intake, my airflow is messed. 2 front intakes, another middle fan (same bay as front intake) blowing right at my GPUs, and then a top fan exhaust and a side fan which I had blowing on the cards as well. I flipped that one around to be an exhaust, and made some shrouds. It works pretty well at exhausting the GPU heat you can feel it blowing hot air out but unfortunately the top GPU is running about 5C hotter now. I'm debating trying to flip my front intakes around and using them as exhaust and then I can have the side fan blowing right on the GPUs again. Odd, I know, but it seems like maybe the only viable option right now if I want to drop the GPU temps.
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August 13, 2010 3:59:30 PM

Wolfram23, I just posted a question very similar to your problem. I am using 8 GB of very tall RAM. Thanks for your post, I was going to try the low profile fan option, then read your post. Thanks for the info.

If you have a solution, since I have not purchase a HSF, please post on my thread "Tall Ass RAM Heat Spreaders".

In other words if you had it to do over again........

Thanks for the info on the Scythe fans.
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a c 100 K Overclocking
August 15, 2010 6:27:42 PM

Ok so finally I think I'm happy with the set up. It took a while to get it all straightened out but now it's working quite well, with low temps all around. Essentially I completely reversed my case's air flow.

So here's the top half of the PC. I flipped the left fan around and put a filter on the outside of it. Then you have the reversed heat sink, my RAM, and an internal fan sucking air and throwing it towards the front. On top there's the large fan still working as an exhaust.


Here's the front fans, I set them into the top 2 slots, flipped them around, and removed the filters.


These are the Scythe Setsugen heat sinks I put on my 5850s. They work pretty well and are nice and quiet. They're super wide tho so I had to put the side fan on the outside of the case...


I also made some shrouds/bezels for these. On the GPU heat sinks I cut some clear plastic and taped them over the fans. The fans blow upwards, so the bottom GPU was heating the top one up by a lot (as much as 10C). By simply adding the plastic thing, it dropped the temps down completely so they're within 1C of eachother. I then added the external side fan by flipping the glas part around and reattaching externally. I sawed off the clips because I'm using a Scythe Slipstream Slim which is nice and thin. It's blowing air in (works far better than sucking air out) and I also added a 1/2 shroud internally by cutting one of those large red+white plastic beer cups. It basically forces the air over the GPUs so there's no loses around the back side of the case. Helped drop temps a bit more.

And just as an extra, when I attached the GPU heatsinks, they came with a shitty VRM heat sink that covered the 3 VRM chips but only barely so I custom made a new heat sink for them using other parts that the heatsinks came with...

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a c 100 K Overclocking
August 16, 2010 2:27:41 PM

Best answer selected by Wolfram23.
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a c 183 K Overclocking
August 17, 2010 11:01:22 AM

wolfram23 said:
Ok so finally I think I'm happy with the set up. It took a while to get it all straightened out but now it's working quite well, with low temps all around. Essentially I completely reversed my case's air flow.

So here's the top half of the PC. I flipped the left fan around and put a filter on the outside of it. Then you have the reversed heat sink, my RAM, and an internal fan sucking air and throwing it towards the front. On top there's the large fan still working as an exhaust.
http://i746.photobucket.com/albums/xx103/Wolfram23/My%20PC/IMG_0139.jpg

Here's the front fans, I set them into the top 2 slots, flipped them around, and removed the filters.
http://i746.photobucket.com/albums/xx103/Wolfram23/My%20PC/IMG_0141.jpg

These are the Scythe Setsugen heat sinks I put on my 5850s. They work pretty well and are nice and quiet. They're super wide tho so I had to put the side fan on the outside of the case...
http://i746.photobucket.com/albums/xx103/Wolfram23/My%20PC/IMG_0140.jpg
http://i746.photobucket.com/albums/xx103/Wolfram23/My%20PC/IMG_0142.jpg
I also made some shrouds/bezels for these. On the GPU heat sinks I cut some clear plastic and taped them over the fans. The fans blow upwards, so the bottom GPU was heating the top one up by a lot (as much as 10C). By simply adding the plastic thing, it dropped the temps down completely so they're within 1C of eachother. I then added the external side fan by flipping the glas part around and reattaching externally. I sawed off the clips because I'm using a Scythe Slipstream Slim which is nice and thin. It's blowing air in (works far better than sucking air out) and I also added a 1/2 shroud internally by cutting one of those large red+white plastic beer cups. It basically forces the air over the GPUs so there's no loses around the back side of the case. Helped drop temps a bit more.

And just as an extra, when I attached the GPU heatsinks, they came with a shitty VRM heat sink that covered the 3 VRM chips but only barely so I custom made a new heat sink for them using other parts that the heatsinks came with...
http://i746.photobucket.com/albums/xx103/Wolfram23/My%20PC/IMG_0137.jpg
http://i746.photobucket.com/albums/xx103/Wolfram23/My%20PC/IMG_0138.jpg

Wow! i'm impressed very ingenious solutions there MacGyver!
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a c 100 K Overclocking
August 17, 2010 2:28:32 PM

Haha thanks! :D 
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