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NVIDIA and PHILIPS

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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March 4, 2009 12:57:13 AM

Does anyone know that Philips has compatibility problems with many Nvidia products using HDMI and according to Philips tech it is not fixable.

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March 4, 2009 1:11:39 AM

I purchased my fifth and last Nvidia card today from BFG....No one advised me that Nvidia cant work with Philips 1080 HDMI and as the Philips tech said. Its not fixable. He said it had to do with how THE MONITOR WAS MADE and offered no other explanation. Nothing I have done has resolved it. Using both Vista 64 and Win 7 64. I have read about this in many forums so I am stuck with a $3000 LCD that cant beresolved and I'm not even sure ATI will work with it. BFG knew nothing about it supposedly. But you can search for NVIDIA PHILIPS and hit many forums. Never knew major companies werent on top of things like this.
March 4, 2009 2:40:30 AM

I've turned off many of the features of the TV that are supposed to enhance the graphics. I've also turned off Graphics in Vista to Vista Basic. And it has resolved all but the occasional blink. I'm going to try and update DirectX and I also selected custom display and ticked the choice for hd display. Again it baffles me that techs can not be educated on issues that consumers are well aware of.
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March 4, 2009 2:47:42 AM

well, people in india that speak for the company can probably afford a 3000 dollar tv lol.
a b Î Nvidia
March 4, 2009 3:00:36 AM

This next topics has been merged by TheGreatGrapeApe
  • Nvidia And Philips

    One thread is enough for this.
    March 4, 2009 9:56:43 PM

    Thx, I inadvertantly posted twice. May have found a resolution, so to speak. I talked with someone where I bought the monitor from. He has 2 295's. He recomended dropping the refresh rate to around forty stating that it may have to do with the bandwith of data overwhelming the monitor. His was not a phillips and he experienced the same problem. However if this is a known issue among users why dont they have a recommended standard resolution with the manufacturers
    March 4, 2009 10:26:28 PM

    hmmm the hdtv specs have recommended standard refresh rates and resolutions.
    1920x1080 @ 24/30/60/120/240hz .
    1280x720 @ 24/30/60 hz
    720x480 @ 24/30/60 hz

    if phillips cant stick with those they have bigger issues than just nvidia cards.
    March 5, 2009 9:57:43 PM

    I attempted to resolve it by dropping the refresh rate.
    What I have finally come to find on the internet is that it has to with EDID, a type of video bios that forces handshaking with Vista to establish correct resolutions for the device. It may very well be unresolvable. I am currently using Svideo connection with only a 1024 resolution available at 28Hz. That sucks.
    I advise people at this time to educate themselves in detail on all issues which might affect them later on down the road when they shell out for a digital tv.
    March 5, 2009 10:54:09 PM

    From Wiki


    Some graphics card drivers have historically coped poorly with the EDID, using only its standard timing descriptors rather than its Detailed Timing Descriptors (DTDs). Even in cases where the DTDs were read, the drivers are/were still often limited by the standard timing descriptor limitation that the horizontal/vertical resolutions must be evenly divisible by 8. This means that many graphics cards cannot express the native resolutions of the most common wide screen flat panel displays and liquid crystal display televisions. The number of vertical pixels is calculated from the horizontal resolution and the selected aspect ratio. To be fully expressible, the size of wide screen display must thus be a multiple of 16×9 pixels. For 1366×768 pixel Wide XGA panels the nearest resolution expressible in the EDID standard timing descriptor syntax is 1360×765 pixels. Specifying 1368 pixels as the screen width would yield an unnatural screen height of 769.5 pixels.

    Many Wide XGA panels do not advertise their native resolution in the standard timing descriptors, instead offering only a resolution of 1280×768. Some panels advertise a resolution only slightly smaller than the native, such as 1360×765. For these panels to be able to show a pixel perfect image, the EDID data must be ignored by the display driver or the driver must correctly interpret the DTD and be able to resolve resolutions whose size is not divisible by 8. Special programs are available to override the standard timing descriptors from EDID data; PowerStrip for Microsoft Windows and SwitchResX for Mac OS X. Even this is not always possible however, as some vendors' graphics drivers (notably those of Intel) will not accept custom resolutions, which can make it all but impossible to use the screen's native resolution.
    March 5, 2009 10:57:56 PM

    Wamp said:
    From Wiki


    Some graphics card drivers have historically coped poorly with the EDID, using only its standard timing descriptors rather than its Detailed Timing Descriptors (DTDs). Even in cases where the DTDs were read, the drivers are/were still often limited by the standard timing descriptor limitation that the horizontal/vertical resolutions must be evenly divisible by 8. This means that many graphics cards cannot express the native resolutions of the most common wide screen flat panel displays and liquid crystal display televisions. The number of vertical pixels is calculated from the horizontal resolution and the selected aspect ratio. To be fully expressible, the size of wide screen display must thus be a multiple of 16×9 pixels. For 1366×768 pixel Wide XGA panels the nearest resolution expressible in the EDID standard timing descriptor syntax is 1360×765 pixels. Specifying 1368 pixels as the screen width would yield an unnatural screen height of 769.5 pixels.

    Many Wide XGA panels do not advertise their native resolution in the standard timing descriptors, instead offering only a resolution of 1280×768. Some panels advertise a resolution only slightly smaller than the native, such as 1360×765. For these panels to be able to show a pixel perfect image, the EDID data must be ignored by the display driver or the driver must correctly interpret the DTD and be able to resolve resolutions whose size is not divisible by 8. Special programs are available to override the standard timing descriptors from EDID data; PowerStrip for Microsoft Windows and SwitchResX for Mac OS X. Even this is not always possible however, as some vendors' graphics drivers (notably those of Intel) will not accept custom resolutions, which can make it all but impossible to use the screen's native resolution.


    good info. thanks
    March 6, 2009 3:42:20 AM

    I am apparently as others are stuck with no support from Nvidia or Philips. Neither has responded to my request for support on this topic which forces me to pursue a class action against the developers and manufactures
    March 13, 2009 2:04:04 AM

    Final Resolution: I removed the BFG 9800 gt 1 gb
    Replaced with a previous BFG 9800 gtx 512 MB.
    No longer blinks. Who knows.
    Sent detailed info to Nvidia.
    Waiting for a response.
    Getting an ATI X2
    January 13, 2010 1:46:20 PM

    Are there any further details or resolution to this... I have an ATI Radeo 2600 HD Pro that ran the TV fine but I am now using an integrated NVIDIA chipset (i want to say it is 9600) nonetheless - it cannot display correctly.
    Ive been troubleshooting for wks now and have the latest drivers. Im pissed. Sure, i can reduce the res to 1280 or go with 720p... but I dont think that is a "resolution" to my problem. I want the 1080 i was promised.
    the philips flat tv is a 32pf7320a
    January 13, 2010 9:27:51 PM

    None that I am aware of. I contacted Nvidia's legal representative personally at one time. They did not seem interested in resolving the issue which was well documented on their own forums. Their are standards in place. I have two 9800s from BFG. One is a GTX with 500 mb. The other is a GTS with 1GB. I asume that is why the industry created standards so that when people shell out a lot of money for new tech that the different media is supposed to be certified to work together. From what I understand it has to do with a VESA handshake between the hardware that either Philips or Invidia is not complying with. And Nvidia forums were filled with posts and no responses. My posts were removed from their forum after Nvidia forum members started flaming my post. I assume you are using DVI from the video card to HDMI on the monitor. I'm not sure what to recommend. I prefer NVIDIA but what they are doing is not fair to unsuspecting consumers.
    January 13, 2010 9:41:03 PM

    Umm, I hate to break this to you, but...

    Going after nVidia for this is not your best bet. Nvidia cards push LCD TVs all the time, this is Phillip's problem, they are the ones not adhering to standards.
    January 13, 2010 9:49:11 PM

    Does Nvidia still have over 1100 unresponded posts concerning this on their Forums? Or did they clean them like mine after flaming me? I'm not going after anyone. I'm just responding to an alert I received.
    January 13, 2010 10:06:24 PM

    Fourms are not official support vehicles, if its that big a deal to you, you need to log a ticket with technical support.
    January 13, 2010 10:08:49 PM

    So what exactly was your point in joining this thread? You sound like the attack dogs at Nvidia. This is the end of the conversation for me. You can post to the wind now.
    January 13, 2010 10:17:10 PM

    Wamp said:
    So what exactly was your point in joining this thread? You sound like the attack dogs at Nvidia. This is the end of the conversation for me. You can post to the wind now.


    Mission accomplished.
    January 13, 2010 10:26:02 PM

    I've requested a review of your account and postings on this thread from the Tom's Hardware. You are right. It is apparent what your intent in joining this thread was.
    January 13, 2010 10:28:17 PM

    *SIGH* You really dont get it do you?

    Do nVidia cards have this issue with other brands of LCD TVs? No.

    Does nVidia use their forums as offical technical support? No.

    Are you whining even after people explain these things to you? Yes.
    !