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OS doesn't install on new HD!

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August 25, 2010 2:31:52 AM

I have bought a new WD 500GB for a second drive.
My first drive has W7 64bit on it, and it recognized the new drive properly.
After mounting the new drive I disconnected my W7 drive to simplify matters for installing another OS (XP).
However, every XP installation results in an error msg when I try to install the OS.
The file loading process runs fine, but after the "starting windows" note the blue screen comes up with roughly this text:
A problem has been detected and windows has been shut down to prevent damage to your computer.
If this is the first time you've seen this screen rsstart your computer. If it happens again, do this:
Check for viruses.
Remove newly installed HD or controllers.
Run CHKDSK /F to check for hard drive corruption.
Then restart your computer.


I am running AVG to keep out viruses.
The new drive is installed properly, and is recognized by the system (it shows up). I also have been able to copy test files onto it successfully.
WHY can't I install an OS?

This is my system: http://ggholiday.com/TEMP/system-info.html

More about : install

August 25, 2010 5:19:47 AM

You cant like this. Win7 and winxp are totally different.
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August 25, 2010 6:00:25 AM

Might be 1 of 2 things.
1) Your mobo is quite old and needs you to set this drive manualy to the lowest SATA type the mobo can handle for example you might have you mobo be SATA-I compatible and the HDD is by default SATA-II.
Normally new drives are reverse compatible but some mobo's don't like it, i've had this happen with a 750gb drive so its not just a story.

SOL:There are applications from the HDD manufacturer that allow you to change the HDD firmware settings.


2) Your BIOS setting is set to AHCI and your XP installation does not have the proper drivers.

SOL: Either switch back to IDE within BIOS or the hard way modify your instalation kit to include you mobo's AHCI drivers. The second one can be a real pain and time consuming and having AHCI on can be a real pain with no real gain unless you want to make raid configurations.
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August 25, 2010 6:16:29 AM

there's no firmware shizit... what are you saying?

there's jumper settings on sata drives to make them compatible with older ports. like sata3 have jumper to make it compatible with sata 2 etc etc.
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August 25, 2010 1:13:05 PM

x3style said:
Might be 1 of 2 things.
1) Your mobo is quite old and needs you to set this drive manualy to the lowest SATA type the mobo can handle for example you might have you mobo be SATA-I compatible and the HDD is by default SATA-II.
Normally new drives are reverse compatible but some mobo's don't like it, i've had this happen with a 750gb drive so its not just a story.

SOL:There are applications from the HDD manufacturer that allow you to change the HDD firmware settings..
As you can see in my specs (This is my system: http://ggholiday.com/TEMP/system-info.html) my machine is a pretty recent build, and so is the WD SATA II HDD
x3style said:

2) Your BIOS setting is set to AHCI and your XP installation does not have the proper drivers.

SOL: Either switch back to IDE within BIOS or the hard way modify your instalation kit to include you mobo's AHCI drivers. The second one can be a real pain and time consuming and having AHCI on can be a real pain with no real gain unless you want to make raid configurations.
Switching back to IDE in the BIOS? You mean just for running the old XP CD, right? After XP is installed I can switch the BIOS back to SATA again, to reconnect my #1 drive with W7 on it?
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August 25, 2010 2:37:52 PM

Switching wont matter until you have a compatible drive, i.e IDE drive.
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August 25, 2010 6:46:35 PM

Ok sorry i think i was not precise enough.

1) There are applications that sets HDD features like AAM (Advanced Acoustic Managemet) and APM (Advanced Power Management) and also set the HDD into SATA-I or SATA-II compatibility modes for the ones that do not have jumpers to set them.

2) BIOS setting for the HDD controller for example mine has [IDE]/[AHCI]/[RAID] here IDE mode refers to standard JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks) mode of the SATA controller and not to the actual IDE interface. (I dont make BIOS-es so why they used the confusing naming is beyond me).

AHCI and RAID require special drivers in order for the OS to be able to access the HDD if you OS does not have them at the instalation a blue screen occurs when post install tries to boot.

I hope this is clearer and does not confuse.
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August 26, 2010 5:53:41 AM

x3style said:
Ok sorry i think i was not precise enough.

1) There are applications that sets HDD features like AAM (Advanced Acoustic Managemet) and APM (Advanced Power Management) and also set the HDD into SATA-I or SATA-II compatibility modes for the ones that do not have jumpers to set them.

2) BIOS setting for the HDD controller for example mine has [IDE]/[AHCI]/[RAID] here IDE mode refers to standard JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks) mode of the SATA controller and not to the actual IDE interface. (I dont make BIOS-es so why they used the confusing naming is beyond me).

AHCI and RAID require special drivers in order for the OS to be able to access the HDD if you OS does not have them at the instalation a blue screen occurs when post install tries to boot.

I hope this is clearer and does not confuse.
You were precise enough, I am just a bit slow.
But guess what!
I went into the BIOS and found a submenu under SATA II with 3 options: IDE, AHCI, and RAID. I enabled IDE, loaded the XP CD, and hooorray, it installed!
Turned off PC, and rebooted right into XP again.
I was elated, reconnected the 7 drive, went back into the BIOS to switch back to AHCI, to see whether I could boot into Windows 7 as well. No such luck! "The boot selection failed because a required device is inaccessible".
Now I can't boot into either drive!
When I disconnect the 7 drive and switch the BIOS back to IDE, I get the "NTLDR is missing" notice on booting!
How come it wasn't missing before?
And how do I get those 2 drives to boot, or at least one of them for now?
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August 26, 2010 5:56:32 AM

Fetal said:
Switching wont matter until you have a compatible drive, i.e IDE drive.

I appreciate your desire to help, but am wondering where you get your information from!
I just did what x3style suggested, and he is right.
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August 26, 2010 5:59:30 AM

^ and now you are stuck again.
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August 26, 2010 6:14:33 AM

Fetal said:
^ and now you are stuck again.
I am sure we'll solve all hurdles eventually, no thanks to your help. Are you a troll? If you have no constructive comments, you should not waste space in here.
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August 26, 2010 7:15:20 AM

^ 'if' i am a troll, what makes you think i will answer that question '?'.

Second you cant do this, simple. You have to have winXp or win vista before hand (installed first) to make this work. its not as easy you are thinking it to be. if i had time, i would write the process down, now i don't so i will ''refer' you to Google which is actually flooded with 'type of help you need'.
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August 26, 2010 2:32:01 PM

Fetal said:
^ 'if' i am a troll, what makes you think i will answer that question '?'.

Second you cant do this, simple. You have to have winXp or win vista before hand (installed first) to make this work. its not as easy you are thinking it to be. if i had time, i would write the process down, now i don't so i will ''refer' you to Google which is actually flooded with 'type of help you need'.

By your immature comments it is quite obvious that you are totally ignorant about the subject.
x3style pointed me in the right direction and I have both OS installed on their respective drives.
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August 26, 2010 2:39:51 PM

immature? Sir i think you are again making ridiculous assumptions about me, first you said i am a troll, now i am immature.

Secondly His right direction wont actually take you anywhere. So i urge you to Google your query. or go to some local computer vendor to get it fixed. As always, a person with machine in front of him is better capable of fixing it than ones (us) behind another screen.

Thank You.
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August 26, 2010 3:44:24 PM

Fetal said:
immature? Sir i think you are again making ridiculous assumptions about me, first you said i am a troll, now i am immature.
Immature troll, makes sense. You sound like a leftover from the old teenage chat rooms. Sorry, I don't have time for this banter - got to go back to my work now.
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August 26, 2010 5:26:38 PM

Calm down fellas...lifes too short to be wearing a hammer in your head
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August 26, 2010 7:05:32 PM

@x3style:
Getting frustrated over being unconnected I did this:
Disconnected second drive (XP)
Reset BIOS to default
Ran rescue CD "start-up repair"
Selected "reboot normally".
Got my W7 drive back!
Now we need to figure out how to use the new drive with XP on it!
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August 26, 2010 7:26:31 PM

I am curious, have you considered a dual boot on a single drive?
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a b G Storage
August 26, 2010 7:28:43 PM

Hi Alsenor.

1- For install a dual boot u need star with the old OS 1st and after install the new one, in this case u need install XP 1st and Win 7 in the last place.
2- For install XP in a STA driver u need have XP SP2 or better since XP doesn't have the SATA drivers by default in the installation package.
3- U only can use one drive configuration IDE or AHCI I suggest set it IDE if u don't want connect or disconnect a drive with the rig running.

Let me know if u need more help.
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August 26, 2010 7:36:36 PM

mrface said:
I am curious, have you considered a dual boot on a single drive?
Yes, I have, and decided against it. A total second drive of good size is of more use to me. My other machine has both OS on the same drive, and gives me the option of booting "to previous Windows".
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August 26, 2010 7:42:34 PM

saint19 said:
Hi Alsenor.

1- For install a dual boot u need star with the old OS 1st and after install the new one, in this case u need install XP 1st and Win 7 in the last place.
2- For install XP in a STA driver u need have XP SP2 or better since XP doesn't have the SATA drivers by default in the installation package.
3- U only can use one drive configuration IDE or AHCI I suggest set it IDE if u don't want connect or disconnect a drive with the rig running.

Let me know if u need more help.

Thanks, saint19.
1. But that does not apply here, since I used a second drive for a clean install of XP.
2. My XP CD has SP2 on it, and I still had to change the BIOS to IDE.
3. The way I did it was to disconnect the 7 drive while machine turned off.

I have both OS installed now where I want them. All I need to figure out is how to be offered both at boot-up.
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a b G Storage
August 26, 2010 7:53:39 PM

1- Yeah that apply since u are using the same hardware and both Win 7 and Win XP need recognize the other as an OS.
2- That version is fine.
3- With AHCI model u can unplug the HD with the rig running and u don't have freezing problems or damage HDs.

U can use Vista boot pro for add both OS to the boot options, I used this with my Win 7 and Vista and works fine on both OS.
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a c 342 G Storage
August 26, 2010 8:53:46 PM

The whole discussion of having to install XP first and THEN Win 7 makes an important assumption: that you want to create a dual-boot system that offers you the choice of OS at each boot-up. For this scenario it does not matter whether the two OS's are on one HDD unit or on two. BUT that is NOT what OP has done, or wants to do.

What OP did makes sense, and it is running into only one dilemma. He had a fully-functioning Win 7 installed on an HDD. Then he removed that unit, installed a different HDD, and ran a fresh install of XP on it. After some trouble he learned that this only works if you set the SATA Port Mode for that HDD to "IDE Emulation". That is because Win XP does not have built-in drivers for SATA or AHCI devices, and the easiest escape from that is to let the BIOS fool Win XP into thinking it is dealing with an IDE drive instead. So having found that, OP did succeed in installing XP to the second HDD and it works. Then he re-connects the first HDD containing Win 7 and, after some difficulty, gets it to work again.

Now, here's where the dilemma begins. VERY likely it is working now for the Win 7 OS because two things are set in BIOS for that:
(a) the SATA Port Mode is set to SATA or, more likely, AHCI; and,
(b) the Boot Priority Sequence is set to boot from the specific SATA port that has the HDD containing Win 7 (probably second choice after the optical drive).
In that configuration the machine ought to boot and run smoothly into Win 7 and BOTH hard drives may be available, because Win 7 DOES have built-in drivers for BOTH IDE and AHCI devices. Now, I say MAY be available because I'm not completely sure that Win 7 with its IDE device driver will be able to read that other drive if the BIOS is trying to treat it as an AHCI device, but I think it will be working.

The problem will show up the moment OP tries to boot from the HDD that has XP installed. How would he do that? Yes, it can be done! It only needs TWO changes in BIOS Setup, so OP will need to go into those screens:
(a) change the SATA Port mode to IDE Emulation; and
(b) change the HDD you boot from to the one that contains Win XP. Then you Save and Exit.
If OP does this, the machine should boot into Win XP just fine, BUT you will NOT see the other HDD! Why? You just set the BIOS to deal with all SATA dives by making them emulate IDE drives, but the second HDD had all its info placed there in AHCI mode and there are slight differences. You CAN use the HDD that has Win XP on it, just not the other.

What about going back to using Win 7? Easy. Go into BIOS Setup and change those two items again: set to AHCI mode and set the boot HDD to be the one that has Win 7 on it.

So, how to get both OS's to use both HDD's? That depends on the details of your system, and MIGHT require a re-install of Win XP AND temporary use of a floppy drive! The straightforward way would be to re-install Win XP so that it CAN install to an AHCI device, and set your BIOS always so that all the SATA units' ports are in AHCI Mode. Win XP always had this option - to install a necessary device driver as the very first stage of the OS Install process, using the "F6" key prompt - but it only knows how to do this from a floppy drive and diskette. The procedure usually is detailed in the manual for a mobo, because the device driver you need to put on the floppy diskette is the one for the specific HDD controller on the mobo.

Another option MAYBE could work IF your mobo's BIOS allows you to set the SATA Port Mode separately for each SATA port. Many do not. But if you can set the mode to IDE Emulation for the HDD that has Win XP, and to AHCI for the HDD that contains Win 7, then each could be made to work. In that case one other step is needed. AFTER Win XP is running, you would need to install into it the AHCI device driver, just as other device drivers can be installed. This would allow it to use the AHCI drive as well as its own IDE drive. It just would have to keep its own HDD in IDE mode so it can boot from it.

This system is less convenient to use than a true Dual-Boot system, which is why many do not choose this route.
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August 26, 2010 9:14:15 PM

saint19 said:
1- Yeah that apply since u are using the same hardware and both Win 7 and Win XP need recognize the other as an OS.
No, because the W7 drive was disconnected. The machine did not know there was a W7 installed first! :non: 
saint19 said:
U can use Vista boot pro for add both OS to the boot options, I used this with my Win 7 and Vista and works fine on both OS.
Thanks, I shall look into that.
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August 26, 2010 9:27:17 PM

Paperdoc said:
The whole discussion of having to install XP first and THEN Win 7 makes an important assumption: that you want to create a dual-boot system that offers you the choice of OS at each boot-up. For this scenario it does not matter whether the two OS's are on one HDD unit or on two. BUT that is NOT what OP has done, or wants to do.
Well, I WAS hoping to set up a dual boot eventually. The first hurdles were the installation on the 2 drives.
Paperdoc said:

What OP did makes sense, and it is running into only one dilemma. He had a fully-functioning Win 7 installed on an HDD. Then he removed that unit, installed a different HDD, and ran a fresh install of XP on it. After some trouble he learned that this only works if you set the SATA Port Mode for that HDD to "IDE Emulation". That is because Win XP does not have built-in drivers for SATA or AHCI devices, and the easiest escape from that is to let the BIOS fool Win XP into thinking it is dealing with an IDE drive instead. So having found that, OP did succeed in installing XP to the second HDD and it works. Then he re-connects the first HDD containing Win 7 and, after some difficulty, gets it to work again.
Hallelujah, at least SOME people read my posts with focus! You described exactly what I did, and explained having done.
Paperdoc said:
The problem will show up the moment OP tries to boot from the HDD that has XP installed. How would he do that? Yes, it can be done! It only needs TWO changes in BIOS Setup, so OP will need to go into those screens:
(a) change the SATA Port mode to IDE Emulation; and
(b) change the HDD you boot from to the one that contains Win XP. Then you Save and Exit.
If OP does this, the machine should boot into Win XP just fine, BUT you will NOT see the other HDD! Why? You just set the BIOS to deal with all SATA dives by making them emulate IDE drives, but the second HDD had all its info placed there in AHCI mode and there are slight differences. You CAN use the HDD that has Win XP on it, just not the other.
I AM hoping for a simpler method - maybe like saint19 suggests with Vista boot pro?

Thanks for your detailed post!
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a b G Storage
August 26, 2010 9:43:32 PM

Don't think anyone has mentioned this yet, but perhaps you could simply install XP in a virtual machine and run it from within Windows 7? If you're running Windows 7 Professional or higher, you have a license included for XP as a virtual machine by way of Windows XP Mode. I don't recall you mentioning a specific reason for needing to run the OS'es separately Alsenor...? Could you elaborate on that a bit?

Just throwing it out there as an option...
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August 26, 2010 9:50:47 PM

The_Prophecy said:
Don't think anyone has mentioned this yet, but perhaps you could simply install XP in a virtual machine and run it from within Windows 7? If you're running Windows 7 Professional or higher, you have a license included for XP as a virtual machine by way of Windows XP Mode. I don't recall you mentioning a specific reason for needing to run the OS'es separately Alsenor...? Could you elaborate on that a bit?

Just throwing it out there as an option...
Unfortunately, mine is the Home Edition. You guys are right, one can always make a clean install of XP first, and then install W7 on the same drive, which creates a simple dual boot screen. My problem is that the PC came with a proprietory installation from HP, including all kinds of HP support apps, but no CD. Therefore I have no way of installing XP first, and then W7.
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a b G Storage
August 26, 2010 9:54:53 PM

^U can install XP with any CD of the same version that u already have and use the key that ur case have in the label.
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August 26, 2010 10:09:43 PM

saint19 said:
^U can install XP with any CD of the same version that u already have and use the key that ur case have in the label.
We are talking about not having a W7 CD!
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August 26, 2010 11:39:57 PM

I have always done my systems this way. Multiple drives with independant OSs. All recent PCs will have a hot key for selecting the boot drive when the BIOS loads. This way you never have to worry if one OS crashes it can't affect the others.

You need to slipstream the SATA drivers onto your XP CD. It is easy to do. Just Google "slipstream XP". Put your network driver on it and you can go online as soon as you finish installing XP. Slipstream SP3 too. Make sure you use the correct method for whichever service pack you choose. I think it is different for each one.
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August 26, 2010 11:53:17 PM

turk_1000 said:
I have always done my systems this way. Multiple drives with independant OSs. All recent PCs will have a hot key for selecting the boot drive when the BIOS loads. This way you never have to worry if one OS crashes it can't affect the others.
Makes sense to me.
turk_1000 said:
You need to slipstream the SATA drivers onto your XP CD. It is easy to do. Just Google "slipstream XP". Put your network driver on it and you can go online as soon as you finish installing XP. Slipstream SP3 too. Make sure you use the correct method for whichever service pack you choose. I think it is different for each one.
Ok, but I have XP already installed on the second drive.
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August 27, 2010 12:12:31 AM

It's a good learning experience. You need an XP install disc that has SATA drivers on it anyway. You might do this again someday. It doesn't take that long to install it again.
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August 27, 2010 1:39:29 AM

turk_1000 said:
It's a good learning experience. You need an XP install disc that has SATA drivers on it anyway. You might do this again someday. It doesn't take that long to install it again.
Well, I have to agree with you on that point. I actually enjoy a good installation process too.
I flew over the instructions for the slip streaming, and was impressed with the guys thorough details. My question is: Does the SP3 file include the SATA drivers or is that another slip stream yet?
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October 21, 2010 11:24:59 AM

Sorry i was not around for a while. Once you have installed both of your system its not necesary to have them know about each other.
Remaining on the option that AHCI does not give you any real advantages, i'd stick with IDE mode if i was you, it saves you a lot of headache.

The only thing you need is for each to boot on its own.
From there on you set W7 as your primary boot HDD, and use the W7 instalation disc to start up recovery mode command prompt from witch you used BCDedit (see here for more info http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709667%28W... ) and add the WinXp instalation manualy as a secondary boot option.

for every windows instalation the boot option is in place regardles of dualboot or not.

But if only one OS is installed and does not know of another one it sets itself as the default option of boot and the boot delay timer to 0 this means you never get to see the choice menu.

Now if you add it manualy you can set the default os option and also set the timer on how much time to display the OS options, i'd suggest 10 seconds, and set the default option to the OS you will be using by default.

Its really not a big of a deal, you could probably use BCDedit straight from the W7 os after you reached W7 desktop but its good to know you can use the recovery disc to repair if you manage to somehow make such a change that no OS is booting. It will give you a reassuring feeling that no matter what you do you can rever back using the recovery disc.

I hope i am not too late with my answer.
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a b G Storage
October 21, 2010 1:14:59 PM

Don't reply to dead threads.
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