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LGA 1366 VS LGA 1155 VS LGA 1156 VS LGA 1567!!!

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July 29, 2009 6:41:54 PM

Hi!

I've came across articles and rumors about Intel is going to release motherboards for Core i5 and Core i7 with Socket LGA 1155, Socket LGA 1156, Socket LGA 1156B and Socket LGA 1156C.


I've just learned that many people refused to buy enthusiast LGA 1366 motherboard because its CPU upgrade path would be very expensive and almost impossible to upgrade which made the upgrade path option almost useless.

I also learned that Intel is screwing with many Core i5 sockets like LGA 1156, LGA 1156B and LGA 1156C included LGA 1155. There will also be Lynnfield Core i7 860, 870 which also support socket LGA 1156.

LGA 1156 might last for only 6 months or 1 year and it would be replaced quickly with LGA 1156B and LGA 1156C. It looks like Intel does not wanted us to use the motherboard for more than 6 months or 1 year. :ouch: 

One article from Xtreview also mentioned that Sandy Bridge (Intel's next micro-architecture) will obtain the concept of LGA 1155 so does this mean that LGA 1155 will future proof us more than LGA 1156???? :o 

The questions are that which one of these sockets are better and which one would future proof us more and would Intel's next micro-architecture Sandy Bridge really obtain the concept of LGA 1155 and would LGA 1155 future proof us more than any other sockets?

After reading about Sandy Bridge using LGA 1155, this makes me feel that LGA 1155 is the right choice... Maybe I am wrong.

Looks like we really have to wait until 2010 in order to get the right answer and maybe I am asking this question a bit too early. :D 

Darn! This means that I had to delay my PC build much more than I expected. :fou: 
July 29, 2009 6:45:13 PM

PS:

Looks also like LGA 1567 is a new socket for Xeon processors or for servers only.

So yeah, I should not have bother asking about LGA 1567 perhaps.
July 30, 2009 1:03:21 PM

Knock! Knock! Hello? Anyone home?? :hello: 

I can hear my echo...
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July 30, 2009 3:35:28 PM

To be honost, if you are truly considering getting a i7 or intel platform, get a i7 920 w/ compaitable mobo, and overclock it above 3.5Ghz and be set for years. For around $270 your getting "$1000 CPU" and then some.
July 30, 2009 10:14:28 PM

bildo123 said:
To be honost, if you are truly considering getting a i7 or intel platform, get a i7 920 w/ compaitable mobo, and overclock it above 3.5Ghz and be set for years. For around $270 your getting "$1000 CPU" and then some.


But I thought that Intel had officially stop producing or discontinued Core i7 920 and it's no longer available? :??: 

I heard about the upcoming Core i7 930 which is going to be $15 more than Core i7 920 and the Core i7 860, 870 which are going to support socket LGA 1156 and even worse, LGA 1156 won't last very long and that Intel Sandy Bridge will obtain LGA 1155 socket in the future.

Do you think that it is still worth for me to get Core i7 platform with Core i7 920? Are sure??? :??: 
July 31, 2009 12:46:35 AM

When you would put off building a system for one year just to get a certain part, you don't seem like the type of person who upgrades regularily anyway. Just buy what you need. No one knows what will happen when sandy bridge comes out. We still haven't seen 32 nm Nehalems yet.

It seems like the worst case scenario would be you have to pay an extra $100 or so because your motherboard is incompatible with a new processor in the future. When your looking at an i7, $100 shouldn't be such a big deal.
July 31, 2009 7:48:18 PM

paranoidmage said:
When you would put off building a system for one year just to get a certain part, you don't seem like the type of person who upgrades regularily anyway. Just buy what you need. No one knows what will happen when sandy bridge comes out. We still haven't seen 32 nm Nehalems yet.

It seems like the worst case scenario would be you have to pay an extra $100 or so because your motherboard is incompatible with a new processor in the future. When your looking at an i7, $100 shouldn't be such a big deal.


With all respect and for the sake of making this thread more constructive, I heard many people said that you would never find a CPU for Core i7 Platform that is going to cost you $100 or like Core i7 920 and it would cost you a kidney for new CPU future upgrade for Core i7 Platform so people are avoiding it and looking for Core i5 platform. Actually, Core i7 860 with LGA 1156 (Core i5 platform) might be even faster than Core i7 920 and it would also cost much lesser than Core i7 platform. :ouch: 

I fear that upgrading isn't even an option if I go with Core i7 platform. Core i7 might not be obsolete soon but its upgrade path would be very expensive? :ouch: 

However, I am not in a hurry to upgrade and I still can wait but I just wanted to know about what the heck is Intel doing with all of these sockets. There are too many sockets that could be obstacle to our future PC upgrade. It looks like the ugly history is repeating again. In the past (in 1990s), some people are not able to upgrade their CPU after they just bought their new motherboard and now, it is happening again and Intel is not learning from its past mistakes. This also happened to the early LGA 775 motherboard, if I'm correct.

This really makes me focusing on AMD system more but AMD still needs RD890 motherboard. Motherboard makers said that RD890 motherboards will be available in the early 2010.

I cannot easily escape the "waiting game". :D 
July 31, 2009 8:19:24 PM

I think you should be ok for upgrading with lynnfield. The only connections it has are 20 PCI-E lanes (16 for graphics, 4 for southbridge) and 2 DDR3 DIMM channels. There isn't a lot of upgrading they could do to that, other than move to PCI-E 3.0.

I've never heard about 1156B and 1156C, but even if they make a new socket like those or 1155, the CPUs may still be backwards compatible. I think we'll have to here more from Intel on this.

and when I was referring to the extra $100 on a mobo, I was referring to Lynnfield. It's a more mainstream part and the motherboards will sell for as low as $100. I think it's your best be for upgradeability. But like I said, Sandy Bridge is still about a year away. I'm guessing Intel would want to make their platforms upgradeable and allow those CPUs to work in the P55 boards. But who knows what will happen in a year. AMD could release a new socket with CPUs that are incompatible with AM3.

I agree that you should stay away from LGA 1366 because QPI is best suited for servers and very high end computers that need enough bandwidth for 3 or more GPUs. The CPUs Intel has on its roadmap are 6 cores, which will be quite expensive. A more mainstream solution like LGA 1156 would be better. It will most likely be compatible with cheaper, yet still powerful CPUs in the future.
a c 238 V Motherboard
a b å Intel
July 31, 2009 9:16:17 PM

If you wait for the next best thing, you will wait forever.
If you want an upgrade now, 1366 and i7 is here and doing well on the high end.
If your needs are more modest, 775 and core 2 is doing the job.

If your timeframe is this fall, then 1156 will launch, and there will be some good cpu's available, up to a performance level of the i7 920, and possibly more.
Prices will be more than competitive with current products.

If your timeframe is q1 or q2 of next year, then you will be able to get a 6 core 32nm part, price unknown. My guess is that a 6 core cpu will start at about $300. 32nm gets you twice as much circuitry on the same die space, so it should cost less to put 6 32nm cores in the same space as 4 45nm cores like the i7-920 that we have today. I expect the top 6 core cpu will be in the $1000 range.

August 1, 2009 4:56:07 PM

paranoidmage said:
I think you should be ok for upgrading with lynnfield. The only connections it has are 20 PCI-E lanes (16 for graphics, 4 for southbridge) and 2 DDR3 DIMM channels. There isn't a lot of upgrading they could do to that, other than move to PCI-E 3.0.


Regardless to the Intel sockets, one of the things that we should care the most beside PC future upgrade are USB 3.0 and SATA III and not really PCIe 3.0. PCIe 3.0 is still overkill or has too much bandwidth for the video cards. Today's most video cards don't even use full bandwidth of PCIe 2.0 so I don't think that PCIe 3.0 is a big concern. Anyway, I would certainly be happy to also get PCIe 3.0 if the motherboard makers wanted to add that.

ASUS P6X58 Premium already has USB 3.0 and SATA III support but it is still a Core i7 platform and it does not include PCIe 3.0. Anyway, we still have to see when they are all release into the real world rather than just a spec on white paper or showing at Computex 2009.
August 1, 2009 5:05:48 PM

geofelt said:

If your timeframe is q1 or q2 of next year, then you will be able to get a 6 core 32nm part, price unknown. My guess is that a 6 core cpu will start at about $300. 32nm gets you twice as much circuitry on the same die space, so it should cost less to put 6 32nm cores in the same space as 4 45nm cores like the i7-920 that we have today. I expect the top 6 core cpu will be in the $1000 range.


I think that the 6 core Westmere Processor (Intel Gulftown) is more for server use than for high-end desktop PC and it would not cost below $600. However, I am not sure but I would not certainly wait for Intel Gulftown 6 core CPU. It might be part of Intel Core i7 Extreme Edition that could cost you a limb and it would be very expensive. So this is why I don't expect that the 6 core CPU is going to cost $300 and not even $400 and I don't think that I should bother to wait for it. It might not be a very nice and cheap upgrade for Core i7 platform users unless if they are quite rich. :D 

The Sandy Bridge and LGA 1155 are the things I am focusing on more included the AMD AM3 RD890 motherboards. The problem is that I'm afraid that I still had to wait until 2010 even if I don't plan on getting 32nm 6-Core CPU.
August 4, 2009 5:24:19 PM

zzzzzzzzzzzz :sleep: 
November 1, 2009 2:07:38 PM

Techno-boy said:
I think that the 6 core Westmere Processor (Intel Gulftown) is more for server use than for high-end desktop PC and it would not cost below $600. However, I am not sure but I would not certainly wait for Intel Gulftown 6 core CPU. It might be part of Intel Core i7 Extreme Edition that could cost you a limb and it would be very expensive. So this is why I don't expect that the 6 core CPU is going to cost $300 and not even $400 and I don't think that I should bother to wait for it. It might not be a very nice and cheap upgrade for Core i7 platform users unless if they are quite rich. :D 

The Sandy Bridge and LGA 1155 are the things I am focusing on more included the AMD AM3 RD890 motherboards. The problem is that I'm afraid that I still had to wait until 2010 even if I don't plan on getting 32nm 6-Core CPU.


i think the best thing is to get the i7 920 and overclock that one. intel is going to come out with i9 processors to support 1366 socket mother boards and even processors for the lga 1567 sockets. way too much money. the 920 overclock should give you all you need for less money.
November 1, 2009 6:52:47 PM

I dont see what the problem is. I7-920, 940, 950, 960, 965, 975 all use the FCLGA1366 Socket. If you buy the lowend 920 there are already 5 faster processors to get in that line. That will be cheaper a year from now. Sure they
will be harder to find. But you can't base your purchase on ouuu i might be able
to get a cheaper faster processor a year from now when there are way to many varibles that effect processor prices.

If your looking at upgrading next year then just buy the 920 and overclock.
If your not looking at upgrading anytime soon but still want the possiblity then
get one of the higher end processors now, and overclock them.

I have a 920, and a 975. Running Asus Rampage II Extreme, and MSI Eclipse SLI.
November 4, 2009 12:28:50 PM

Thanks for replying, guys. I thought that this thread was already dead about 2 months ago. Anyway, I am happy to see more replies and suggestions... :) 

Well, now, I think that Core i5 system with 2 DDR3 channels is a way to go more because it is enough as a Desktop Gaming PCs and it would also cost lesser than Core i7 X58 system which uses triple DDR3 channels which is kinda overkill and obviously, most of us would not wanted to upgrade to Hexa-Core CPU which might cost like $1500. I have an impression that LGA 1366 or Core i7 X58 is Intel's marketing hype because who would need a $1500 6-core CPU and a Triple DDR3 channel and spending more money just to run a Desktop PC at home??? This is why I think that LGA 1366 X58 system is more intended for servers but Intel made it also work as a Desktop PC but you would had to pay a lot of money and the future upgrade might be too expensive and might not be possible. Also, upgrading from Core i7 920 to 950 is useless because they are at the same generation but making a major upgrade to a newer cheaper generation architecture CPU would make more sense perhaps but on Intel's LGA 1366 roadmap, there is only Intel Hexa Core Gulftown CPU which is very expensive and overkill for Desktop PCs. Intel might not even release Core i7 930 (refreshed versions of Core i7 920) and you certainly don't wanna spend more money for just a minor upgrade. However, there are also Core i7 brand processors that work on cheaper Core i5 motherboards too like Core i7 860 without letting you spend a lot of money and you can get faster performance than Core i7 920. This is also why I felt that Triple DDR3 channels is unnecessary because it did not boost much speed for Core i7 920 in comparison to Core i7 860 supported with only 2 DDR3 Channels which is faster than Core i7 920 and also consumes lesser power as well as costing lesser due to cheaper mainstream Lynnfield P55 motherboard.

So I think that LGA 1156 is the right choice to go with for many people now unless if you wanna spend more money. Getting the ones with support for SATA 3 and USB 3.0 would make more sense too. I understand that some of you guys bought the Core i7 920 and X58 motherboard in the early 2009 because the cheaper Lynnfield LGA 1156 Core i5 system was not available by that time and many wanted to move to Nehalem architecture so you guys got no choice and had to pay more for high-end Core i7 system...

Neog2 said:
If your looking at upgrading next year then just buy the 920 and overclock.
If your not looking at upgrading anytime soon but still want the possiblity then
get one of the higher end processors now, and overclock them.


Well, overclocking is still not an actual upgrading to newer generation architecture processor. Just because you overclock older generation processor but that does not mean that you are actually upgrading it. ;) 

I think that I better go with something like ASUS P7P55D PRO and Core i7 860...
November 4, 2009 12:55:27 PM

I've also heard lately that Intel had scrapped P57 with Braidwood Technology off from its roadmap for early 2010 so we might never see any release of P57 motherboards... :(  (just to let you all know)
November 4, 2009 1:06:50 PM

syllky said:
i think the best thing is to get the i7 920 and overclock that one. intel is going to come out with i9 processors to support 1366 socket mother boards and even processors for the lga 1567 sockets. way too much money. the 920 overclock should give you all you need for less money.


Welcome to Tomshardware forum since this is your first post. :D 
December 4, 2009 5:30:23 AM

I think the point most are making (and I agree) Buying a PC specifically with the intent of some future open-ended upgrade is a waste of time... Buy what you want NOW for what you want to DO and what you want to PAY .. Building now for the future is idle speculation... and it never works unless you are the type (such as a reviewer) who builds and rebuilds pc's FREQUENTLY and without planing any long term use of it.
December 4, 2009 11:31:01 PM

socket 478 versus socket 370 vs socket 462 vs.....

March 5, 2010 3:31:22 PM

paranoidmage said:
When you would put off building a system for one year just to get a certain part, you don't seem like the type of person who upgrades regularily anyway. Just buy what you need. No one knows what will happen when sandy bridge comes out. We still haven't seen 32 nm Nehalems yet.

It seems like the worst case scenario would be you have to pay an extra $100 or so because your motherboard is incompatible with a new processor in the future. When your looking at an i7, $100 shouldn't be such a big deal.


Hey, Welcome to the world of computers.. No matter what you buy, it eventually becomes outdated. I was considering to go i7 myself, until I learned about what's coming down the road from Intel!

Sandy Bridge will be nice, but the chip I am waiting for is Haswell! In a nutshell, it will be an 8 core chip, with Hyper-threading, along with the upcoming Larabee architecture built into the CPU itself...

Don't believe me? Here's the info on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Haswell_%28microarch...

This baby is the real one to plan for...
May 16, 2010 11:52:30 PM

donovan75 said:
Hey, Welcome to the world of computers.. No matter what you buy, it eventually becomes outdated. I was considering to go i7 myself, until I learned about what's coming down the road from Intel!

Sandy Bridge will be nice, but the chip I am waiting for is Haswell! In a nutshell, it will be an 8 core chip, with Hyper-threading, along with the upcoming Larabee architecture built into the CPU itself...

Don't believe me? Here's the info on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Haswell_%28microarch...

This baby is the real one to plan for...


Even though that's coming out it's major overkill. An i5 750 is all you're going to need for another year or 2 unless there's a major breakthrough in software technology (i.e. a new os). I'm suspecting that the LGA 1155 and LGA 1156 are going to be backwards compatible considering there's only 1 difference in the pins. Plus the LGA 1156 has i7 support too.
May 31, 2010 4:15:55 AM

I went for a i7 930 with a gx58-ud3r motherboard with usb and sata 3.0 with 3x2gb ddr3 1600 because in 4-5 years it will be obsolete but it might be able to keep up with basic things like the p4 prescott did. I am sure that I will be able to notice a difference with the tripple channel memory. I wonder how much the cheapest 6 core 1366 will be. hopefully under 500$ the i7 970 should be under 900$
a b V Motherboard
June 9, 2010 4:07:30 PM

LGA1156 is being supplimented with LGA1155 and will not be cross compatible. LGA1366 is due to be replaced next year with LGA2011 (quand channel memory) so either way both sockets will be on their way out

Weather or not Intel continue to produce chips for LGA1156 & LGA1366 is not entirely clear
July 14, 2010 6:39:49 AM

Well, if intel decides to turn 1366, and 1156 sockets obsolete, then hopefully these prices will come down, and I can just buy cheap motherboards in the future. I guess I will just stick with i7. This will take a long time, though, and that time just lets me enjoy what I had for a year so far, and time to save up.
July 15, 2010 4:06:17 PM

Intel change socket very fast, I am going to upgrade from my Q6600 -> i7 860 so I must think again. It's a dead end for 1156. Sure that when my next upgrade from i7 860 with 1156 i have to change main board again.

Btw 1155 is 1 pin less, make it compatable with 1156 will be great.

LGA 1156/
Socket H 2009 ? Intel Core i7 (800 series)
Intel Core i5
Intel Core i3 LGA 1156
? 2.5 GT/s DMI bus is a (perhaps modified) PCI-E x4 v1.1 interface

LGA 1155/
Socket H2 Future (2010/Q4) ? Intel Sandy Bridge-DT LGA 1155
? 2.5 GT/s Supports 20 PCI-E 2.0 lanes
Set to supplant Socket H (LGA 1156).

Only 1-2 years. 775 -> 1366 is about 4

October 15, 2010 8:59:02 PM

boeonoz said:
Intel change socket very fast, I am going to upgrade from my Q6600 -> i7 860 so I must think again. It's a dead end for 1156. Sure that when my next upgrade from i7 860 with 1156 i have to change main board again.

Btw 1155 is 1 pin less, make it compatable with 1156 will be great.

LGA 1156/
Socket H 2009 ? Intel Core i7 (800 series)
Intel Core i5
Intel Core i3 LGA 1156
? 2.5 GT/s DMI bus is a (perhaps modified) PCI-E x4 v1.1 interface

LGA 1155/
Socket H2 Future (2010/Q4) ? Intel Sandy Bridge-DT LGA 1155
? 2.5 GT/s Supports 20 PCI-E 2.0 lanes
Set to supplant Socket H (LGA 1156).

Only 1-2 years. 775 -> 1366 is about 4



This is just a strange post in July of 2010 regarding future 'possible' release dates on architecture that's already out there and ready to be replaced in a few months. Or am I missing something?
October 17, 2010 9:49:17 PM

I'd say if your trying to build for longevity just buy the most powerful processor you can afford, and don't plan on replacing it. Processors generally last a lot longer than video cards do as far as remaining useful, take a look at how we aren't even to the point where you "need" more than two cores for anything yet (you can even get by with just one), even though we have hexa-core processors. If you're bulding a system and planning for it to last a long time, my advice is to get the best base components (processor, motherboard, hdd, disc drives, monitor, etc) you can now, and plan to upgrade the more easily/cheaply replaced components like your video card and, if you really feel like you need it, adding more memory. By the time your a high-end processor from today is no longer useful, its likely that your other component's wont be replaceable either, much like AGP graphics cards and DDR2 RAM are now (different generations I know, and DDR2 isn't completely dead, but you get the point). Worst case scenario is PCI, SATA, and USB standards remain the same for the next 10 years or so, and the importance of graphics over processor for gaming reverses, but even then by the time the processor needs replaced that $1500 processor you couldn't build with initially may be affordable (although maybe not an ideal upgrade).
I realized after writing this I'm just blindly assuming your primary concern is gaming. If you're building a system to do CPU intensive work, it may very well be better to pour money into the other parts of your system (obviously not planning on replacing them) and skimp on the CPU, so you won't be at such a loss if you choose wrong and end up having to move to a different socket to keep up.
October 27, 2010 4:32:35 AM

intel will release the lga 1155 for mainstream segments which would a lot similar to lga 1156,
and in high end segment it will show "lga 2011"
info is as follows



LGA 1155:LGA 1155, also known as Socket H2, is an Intel microprocessor compatible socket which supports future Intel Sandy Bridge microprocessor. LGA is short for Land Grid Array.

LGA 1155 is designed as a replacement for the LGA 1156 (also known as socket H). LGA 1155 has 1155 protruding pins to make contact with the pads on the processor. Processors of LGA 1155 and LGA 1156 sockets are not compatible with each other since they have different socket notches.

P65 and P67 along with the H65 and H67 are the chipsets that support this socket. The first two don't have video output while the other two do. Other specifications such as PCI Express lane, USB and SATA speed are the same as P55, H55 and H57 chipsets.




LGA 2011:LGA 2011, also known as Socket R, is an unreleased Intel CPU socket. This socket is set to supersede Intel's LGA 1366 (Socket B) in the high-end and performance desktop and market areas. This socket will have 2011 protruding pins which touch contact points on the underside of the processor.

Socket 2011 uses QPI to connect the CPU to either additional CPUs in a dual socket system, or to add-in chipsets. The CPU will handle northbridge functions, such as memory control, PCIe control, DMI, FDI, and other functions integrated on chip.

This socket is expected to be released alongside Sandy Bridge-EX in Q3 2011, and will support 4 memory channels as well as 40 PCIe 3.0 lanes [1]; the socket will measure 58.5mm x 51mm, and is backwards compatible with LGA 1366 cooling solutions

i hope you people trust wiki!!
a b V Motherboard
October 27, 2010 4:02:10 PM

*sigh* Please look at the OP date before posting. DO NOT wake up dead threads.
a b V Motherboard
October 27, 2010 4:36:35 PM

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