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WAP WEP and WPA

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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November 25, 2009 11:32:13 AM

My original home hub was based on WEP. Having changed my laptop and broadband provider, I need to go back to WAP (or is it WPA?)

How do I do it please

More about : wap wep wpa

Anonymous
November 25, 2009 11:44:27 AM

Presumably the router is a new model. Most will still support WEP but WPA is simpler and safer.

Start by reading the quick-start leaflet that came with the router (or downloading the manual -- either from the CD which came from it or from the manufacturer's site).

Connect computer to router by ethernet cable (it makes life simpler when setting up). Open your browser and in the address bar put the IP address of the router (usually 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 -- but see manual). You should be greeted by a login box -- User Name is usually admin and the Password is usually password (but see manual if not).

Once in go to Wireless Settings and choose WPA-PSK TKIP as your security protocol. Choose a passphrase. Save setting. Exit.

Apply the same choices to your wireless adapter's utilities (or Windows Networking). Disconnect ethernet cable and see if you can connect wirelessly.
November 27, 2009 3:30:49 PM

Quote:
Presumably the router is a new model. Most will still support WEP but WPA is simpler and safer.

Start by reading the quick-start leaflet that came with the router (or downloading the manual -- either from the CD which came from it or from the manufacturer's site).

Connect computer to router by ethernet cable (it makes life simpler when setting up). Open your browser and in the address bar put the IP address of the router (usually 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 -- but see manual). You should be greeted by a login box -- User Name is usually admin and the Password is usually password (but see manual if not).

Once in go to Wireless Settings and choose WPA-PSK TKIP as your security protocol. Choose a passphrase. Save setting. Exit.

Apply the same choices to your wireless adapter's utilities (or Windows Networking). Disconnect ethernet cable and see if you can connect wirelessly.


Thank you for that. My problem is that, essentially, I have tried this (under the direction of the broadband provider help desk - with the exception of using a direct connection). I have tried changing channels too, and still this laptop will not connect. It reports limited connectivity, even though the laptop is only inches from the router! I had previously been using WPA with this (Asus) laptop with another provider, but had to downgrade to WEP when my wife got a 2nd hand (Toshiba) laptop. The problem started when we changed provider. In fact we had other problems that I am currently migrating BACK to the original provider. In the mean time my wife has bought a brand new laptop - and that works fine with the current router. The Toshiba has gone! This makes me think that my (Asus) laptop somehow has lost it's ability to "connect" using WPA. Is this a possibility?

As the transfer of providers is now just days away, I shall delay trying your advice until the new router is installed and working properly!

Many thanks in the mean time.
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Anonymous
November 27, 2009 6:02:04 PM

You should move the computer further away from the router -- such close proximity, supposedly can cause problems. Personally I rather doubt this is the cause of your problem, but it is received wisdom not to run them too close.

I would test the Asus with a different wireless router and see what happens.

You have, of course, turned the Asus' wireless on - it's sometimes a switch on the front or side of the laptop case -- or can be keyboard combination.
November 28, 2009 8:05:39 AM

Quote:
You should move the computer further away from the router -- such close proximity, supposedly can cause problems. Personally I rather doubt this is the cause of your problem, but it is received wisdom not to run them too close.

I would test the Asus with a different wireless router and see what happens.

You have, of course, turned the Asus' wireless on - it's sometimes a switch on the front or side of the laptop case -- or can be keyboard combination.


I appreciate your comment - regarding proximity. I have tried both close to the router - within inches, and just within the room and a couple of rooms away - all with the same "limited or no connectivity" message

And yes, Fn +F2 and physical switch on side of computer both switched on so that I get the info box saying 'LAN on'

My current (about to be changed) provider has sent me a replacement router - and an additional 'dongle' that should have done the trick, but to no avail. The Asus laptop is about 2 years old, and has worked in WPA in the past.

It is a frustrating puzzle!
Anonymous
November 28, 2009 1:06:09 PM

Did you test the Asus with the new router ?

If changing the wireless adapter in the Asus also didn't solve the problem it may be something you're overlooking.

I can only suggest going over the instructions in the manual again. WPA should not be an issue with recent equipment.
November 28, 2009 2:46:09 PM

Quote:
Did you test the Asus with the new router ?

If changing the wireless adapter in the Asus also didn't solve the problem it may be something you're overlooking.

I can only suggest going over the instructions in the manual again. WPA should not be an issue with recent equipment.


Initially, I was using a Linksys WAG router - for both the WPA and then the WEP. The new provider sent a "Livebox" of their own - and a replacement - plus an 'adaptor' for the laptop. I am currently migrating back to Provider 1, and am waiting for their new hardware. Then, having got the latest router working wired to my PC, I shall follow your instructions, initially hardwiring the laptop and then trying to go wireless.

Watch this space!!
Anonymous
November 28, 2009 5:10:24 PM

I think, if you just make sure that everything is working when connected via ethernet, then that wireless works without wireless security, you should get it working with security in due course.
!