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What is the purpose of a "fresh" SSD benchmark?

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a b G Storage
September 7, 2010 2:31:29 AM

I got to thinking about it. I see benchmarks for fresh drives and used drives in the same articles. but all drives that get purchased will be in the used state even after a couple of days/week of use, which will be the real world usage numbers that actually impact on our lives and computer usage. So do we include these numbers just to compare degradation and does that degradation indicate a weakness of some kind or another with a particular SSD? or is it just to verify peak manufacturer numbers? or....

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September 7, 2010 3:23:33 AM

Could be wrong but this is how I interpreted the benchmarks. The 'used' figures aren't static real world figures that indicate what sort of performance you'll get. The fact that there is any degradation at all from new to used shows that performance decreases on a continuum as the drive fills up. The advice for SSDs seems to be to keep x percent free for it to operate satisfactorily. So I guess what's important is the difference between the new and used figures which tell you just how much the drives decrease in performance as it fills with data. The 'fresh' benchmarks are therefore used as a baseline, and probably to verify manufacturer numbers as you said.
a b G Storage
September 7, 2010 4:39:43 AM

I have seen people talk about how an SSD can fill up and not have an impact on access time. but what you are saying is that SSD transfer rates fall with an increase in used space and I haven't really seen that happen (noticeably for me everyday anwyay) so I'm not sure if thats absolute, can u link me up. I always thought that the performance drop was from just use, not actually related to used/free ratio. I haven't really heard of keep x percent free for good performance with SSDs, though i try and maintain atleast 25% free. I know that definitely is good policy for mechanical drives. thanks
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September 7, 2010 1:33:45 PM

The part where I say 'as the drive fills up' would probably be more correct if it said 'the more it is used'. It's to do with wear on the cells themselves. There's a article (although a little dated) on it here http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9132668/Analysis....

Anyway, I ran some of my own benchmarks over my one year old Kingston SSDs and my results were pretty good I suppose. Comparing it with when they were new, transfer rates have gone down by a few megs on average - which isn't going to be noticed in every day usage. As for keeping a certain % free, I haven't experienced this myself, just repeating what I've read in a number of places.
a b G Storage
September 7, 2010 2:44:17 PM

blackmancer said:
I got to thinking about it. I see benchmarks for fresh drives and used drives in the same articles. but all drives that get purchased will be in the used state even after a couple of days/week of use, which will be the real world usage numbers that actually impact on our lives and computer usage. So do we include these numbers just to compare degradation and does that degradation indicate a weakness of some kind or another with a particular SSD? or is it just to verify peak manufacturer numbers? or....

No. Everything you install on a fresh drive will keep its performance. Once the drive fills up both read and write performance will go down but not on the part which was installed on a fresh drive and which has remained unchanged.
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