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You would think that 9.8 inches was enough. Overheating/Shut off prob

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February 26, 2009 9:36:32 PM

So here is the thing. I built a computer last summer, first one, and I have had trouble with it shutting off when I leave it on overnight. I think it is due to overheating. The CPU has been idling at 68c so that sounds pretty bad. Just cleaned the dust out of it so its idling at 53c. The rest of the computer is doing fine. According to SpeedFan something like 35c at all times. GPU is a little worse (45-50c) off but I am planning to replace it in a couple of days so thats not important. However what I don't understand is why it is overheating in the first place. The case fan pulling in air is 9.8 inches in diameter, and the pushes out cool air, not even warm. Like I said the inside is staying cool. Its only the cpu effected. I could just buy a new cpu fan, and I bet that would fix the problem. However the puzzler comes here. When it shuts off, it does it at night, when the only thing it is doing is playing music. So what causes it to overheat that much?

So the problem is two fold. Why is it overheating in the first place, and why is it doing it when it is idling at night?

I kind of know how to fix this, but I wanted to understand better the source of the problem. Like I said this is my first homebuilt rig so I am new to this.

Specs

Ram: 2gig
Processor: 3.4 Pentium D
Asus P5n-E sli
Case: Case
GPU: 6600 GeForce 512 bus

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a c 113 B Homebuilt system
February 26, 2009 11:29:23 PM
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Regardless, an idle temp of 68C is very bad. You should just replace the CPU as long as you are replacing the cooler, as you can run a modern C2D in that system.

Your system could be shutting down because it's attempting a virus scan, or some update. Or perhaps a virus.

You could have a foreign particle, such as a hair, between the cooler and CPU. The push-pins might not be properly engaged. The pre-applied thermal interface material on the stock CPU cooler might have been damaged.
February 27, 2009 12:26:21 AM

Thanks. However how necessary is it to replace the processor? I mean I don't really want to spend much more money. Is that more of a preference thing or a necessity?

Sorry but I am new to building rigs. C2D stands for dual core?
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February 27, 2009 12:42:38 AM

C2D = Core 2 Duo (which is a dual core, yes)

He is saying that since your CPU is outdated, it is worth it to buy a new one while you have everything opened up. Here is a good Intel C2D that would work well for you.

There are some combo deals with CPU coolers, too...

Combo 1
Combo 2
Combo 3
February 27, 2009 3:13:44 AM

Would the 2.8 duo be par with the 3.4 that I currently have?
a c 90 B Homebuilt system
February 27, 2009 4:00:42 AM

Quite a bit faster. The closest benchmark I could get was an older, slower E6600 2.4Ghz C2D and your Pentium D950 3.4Ghz.

3DMark06 - CPU Version 1.1 (1280x1024 @ 32 bit)
P4 950 3.4Ghz = 1512 score vs C2D E6600 2.4Ghz = 2098 score

The E7400 will do even better.
a c 113 B Homebuilt system
February 27, 2009 5:28:43 AM

If you do that, you should go with combo number 1.
I say that because it's the easiest installation. There's nothing really to recommend the Rosewill cooler (number 2) and the Xigmatek, while being by far the best cooler in the list, is also the most difficult to install correctly. Also the Xigmatek (number 3) would require additional purchases.
February 27, 2009 6:21:53 AM

Thanks for so much help. One last question. Just checking but if I chose to get the cooler now, and get the new cpu later, would that create a problem? It should be much trouble to just switch over the cooler right?
February 27, 2009 6:37:31 AM

It may be that big 9.8 in. fan is messing with the airflow for the cpu.And 68 celcius is wayyyyy tooo hooootttt for a cpu at idle.Try reseating the heatsink as well as re-applying thermal compound.A little too much will have the oppisite of the desired affect.Same goes for too little.Too little will not cover the heat spreader entirely,leaving parts of the heatsink not touching the spreader.Too much,and the compound starts to act like an insulator,preventing the heat from transfereing to the heatsink properly.That large fan could be moving so much air,it is creating a sort of vortex,keeping the cpu fan from drawing enough air to cool the cpu adequitely.Just a few things to try.Goodluck.

Dahak

ASUS P5N-D
C2D E8500 STOCK
ZALMAN 9500 CPU COOLER
2X2GIG DDR2 1066 IN DC MODE
TOUGHPOWER 850WATT PSU
EVGA GTX 260
SMILIDON RAIDMAX GAMING CASE
LG 24IN WS LCD 1920X1080
250GIG HD/500GIG HD
LOGITECH G15 GAMING KEYBOARD
G5 GAMING MOUSE
LOGITECH Z-5500 5.1 SURROUND SYSTEM
500WATS CONTINUOUS,1000 PEAK
WIN XP PRO
a c 113 B Homebuilt system
February 27, 2009 11:16:55 AM

thedonquixotic said:
Thanks for so much help. One last question. Just checking but if I chose to get the cooler now, and get the new cpu later, would that create a problem? It should be much trouble to just switch over the cooler right?


You would have to clean off the old thermal paste and apply new thermal paste for the new CPU, but yes that would be OK.
February 27, 2009 7:38:43 PM

Thanks for all the help!
!