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Hard drive not detected by bios

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September 12, 2010 2:12:26 AM

Hello,
I have a failed Samsung HD321KJ HDD and i think that the problem is either firmware or electrical. I am leaning more towards firmware though because there is no clicking noise coming from the drive. The drive is undetected by the BIOs and when it initially failed the computer just froze. I know about the $1500 solutions and have called several shops in my area. I even got advice from one of the shops telling me to freeze my drive for 24 hours and hook it up to an external enclosure. What is the problem? and How can I fix my hard drive so it can be used again? or if not fixed, How can I at least recover the data lost from my HDD?
a c 104 G Storage
September 12, 2010 5:34:16 PM

Hi there,

You didn't mention if this is a boot drive or secondary data drive. I assume it has the OS on it, since your computer crashed.

Disconnect the power and data cables, and on a computer that has a different PSU, plug in the power cable and listen to hear if it spins up. If it does spin up, turn off the computer, connect the SATA 7 pin data cable, boot up the desktop and see if the BIOS and OS recognizes the drive. Make sure the BIOS CMOS settings are "enabled" for this additional SATA port.

That will tell you if the drive is electrically functional, and if you can simply see the data to copy it over to a new HDD.
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September 12, 2010 7:25:34 PM

John_VanKirk said:
Hi there,

You didn't mention if this is a boot drive or secondary data drive. I assume it has the OS on it, since your computer crashed.

Disconnect the power and data cables, and on a computer that has a different PSU, plug in the power cable and listen to hear if it spins up. If it does spin up, turn off the computer, connect the SATA 7 pin data cable, boot up the desktop and see if the BIOS and OS recognizes the drive. Make sure the BIOS CMOS settings are "enabled" for this additional SATA port.

That will tell you if the drive is electrically functional, and if you can simply see the data to copy it over to a new HDD.

Well the drive is my boot drive and I have already hooked it up to another computer and it does spin up, but it does not get read even when the additional port is "enabled". So I think this is telling me that problem is electrical and the PCB failed on me. Is there any way I could get another PCB to replace it or replace the fried chip?
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a c 104 G Storage
September 13, 2010 12:29:46 AM

JCBeatz said:
Well the drive is my boot drive and I have already hooked it up to another computer and it does spin up, but it does not get read even when the additional port is "enabled". So I think this is telling me that problem is electrical and the PCB failed on me. Is there any way I could get another PCB to replace it or replace the fried chip?


Hi again,
It does sound like the PCB is not functioning.
Attached to the second computer, do you see the Drive as Drive 1, or Drive 2, in the BIOS, depending on how many HDD are already connected?

You can replace the PCB on a HDD, but it is very fiddley. To replace the PCB, you need to obtain exactly the same model # HDD, remove the PCB from bottom of the old disk, and replace it with the PCB of the new disk. The tricky part is getting the fine flat ribbon cables coming from inside the drive case, inserted properly. You never want to open the disc enclosure space. If you haven't taken a HDD apart previously, don't think I make this one your initial exploration.

Let it sit overnight and see if you can get it to work when it's cool. Have a plan to copy all the data to a fully functioning drive if it does briefly come to life. If that doesn't work, you could try the freezer bag trick which cools down all the components temporarily
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September 13, 2010 2:12:46 AM

John_VanKirk said:
Hi again,
It does sound like the PCB is not functioning.
Attached to the second computer, do you see the Drive as Drive 1, or Drive 2, in the BIOS, depending on how many HDD are already connected?

You can replace the PCB on a HDD, but it is very fiddley. To replace the PCB, you need to obtain exactly the same model # HDD, remove the PCB from bottom of the old disk, and replace it with the PCB of the new disk. The tricky part is getting the fine flat ribbon cables coming from inside the drive case, inserted properly. You never want to open the disc enclosure space. If you haven't taken a HDD apart previously, don't think I make this one your initial exploration.

Let it sit overnight and see if you can get it to work when it's cool. Have a plan to copy all the data to a fully functioning drive if it does briefly come to life. If that doesn't work, you could try the freezer bag trick which cools down all the components temporarily

On the second computer it is read as Drive 2 in the BIOs I think.

I have already tried the freezer trick and it did nothing for me sadly. I put it in an external enclosure and the drive spun up but was not recognized as a HDD it was seeing the addition ports as a generic USB hub. I think I am going to find the same model HDD and find a shop that can replace it for me.

Thank you for all the advice I appreciate the help.
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