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Hyper 212 plus and thermal paste question

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September 27, 2010 9:04:08 PM

Hello everyone,

I am a total newbie that is trying to build my own computer. I got the cooler master hyper 212 plus heatsink and I am not sure how you apply the thermal paste. I have already searched the forums and understand that I should put two lines between the pipes on the heatsink. But do I also have to apply thermal paste on the cpu too? Or is the thermal paste on the heatsink alone sufficient. Also, would pea method be used on the cpu if it is needed? Thanks a lot.

a b K Overclocking
September 28, 2010 12:15:28 AM

Depends on the paste manufacturer's recommendations. For AS5 I made a haze (like that you get when you wax a car) on the 212+'s pipes and on the CPU; put on a little AS5 and wiped with a coffee filter. Then I put a small line across the CPU - the size of an uncooked kernel of rice.
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September 28, 2010 3:38:34 AM

lol i just opened a thread about whether the included paste is any good. i too am lacking a solid idea of the best way to apply it.

I'm about to install this thing as soon as my case comes in. I'd like to point out that the hyper 212 instructions tell you pretty much nothing about how to apply the paste - nor does the instructional video on the web site. it actually skips right over that step.

Let's hear about exactly how to apply this stuff with the incl. thermal paste!
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a c 183 K Overclocking
September 28, 2010 3:48:46 AM

I use the dot method on some areas and thin lines on the copper contact pipes.
Worked well for me.
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September 28, 2010 5:33:30 AM

i tried to contact coolermaster about this today and the tech told me to put it on both the heatsink and cpu and spread it with a credit card.. i don't think that is the best way to do it. anyone else care sharing their experience?
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September 28, 2010 5:39:00 AM

I'm still having trouble finding exactly how much and where to apply the paste. I can tell you that what the tech said sounds like too much - I've read that too much paste can ruin the setup. Idea is to get *just* enough to spread a thin thin layer across the contact area.

Calling all hyper 212 paste applicators!
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September 28, 2010 6:23:44 AM

Here's another part that's unclear - there is a small rectangular piece of foam included that the instructions label as 'vibration absorbing foam' or something. Ok I get the idea but it gives no mention of where the little foam piece is placed in the installation...
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September 29, 2010 7:47:25 PM

Mine has small black foam pieces on the corners of the fan where it contacts the fins on the heatsink. Is that what you are talking about? And also I would think the application method would be different depending on the viscosity of the paste. I have been wondering about this myself. I would pack the channels full, level it off with a credit card, and then apply a very thin layer to the CPU itself. I can't do it that way because the IC Diamond paste I have is about as thick as silly putty, and you just can't spread it.
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a b K Overclocking
September 29, 2010 8:04:52 PM

When I install that heatsink I just ran thin lines on the pipes and let the contact pressure spread it out. Seems to work well on the 2 systems i did that to.

For normal heatsinks I use the small blob or line method.

For small bare chips(GPU/chipset/old cpus) I use the credit card method.

Just a heads up, I was using AS5 and when I did try the cooler master stuff it almost seemed to dry/thick(it just peeled off) to spread with the credit card method.

The 212+ is hard to beat for the price.
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September 29, 2010 8:10:37 PM

nukemaster said:
When I install that heatsink I just ran thin lines on the pipes and let the contact pressure spread it out. Seems to work well on the 2 systems i did that to.

For normal heatsinks I use the small blob or line method.

For small bare chips(GPU/chipset/old cpus) I use the credit card method.

Just a heads up, I was using AS5 and when I did try the cooler master stuff it almost seemed to dry/thick(it just peeled off) to spread with the credit card method.

The 212+ is hard to beat for the price.


So you only put thermal paste on the heatsink pipes and none on the cpu? I am going to be using mx-2
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a b K Overclocking
September 29, 2010 8:31:44 PM

stankuo said:
So you only put thermal paste on the heatsink pipes and none on the cpu? I am going to be using mx-2

Yes, that is all i did. As the heatsink gets pressed into place any extra paste should squeeze into any spaces that need more paste.

You can put a thin layer(credit card method) over the entire heatsink or cpu as well and get similar results. Paste on both surfaces is often more then is needed and can in fact give worse performance. Thin is good, but not too thin since you still want enough to fill in any small scratches or imperfections in the heatsink or cpu.

Forgot to mention another method i have recently been trying. The baggie method. Place a dab of compound on the cpu or heatsink base and spread it with your finder in a plastic bag. This gives very good control over the thickness of the coating.
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a b K Overclocking
September 29, 2010 8:47:40 PM

I put some in the 'valleys' and put a tiny line on the pipes and got great results. you can put some in the valleys if you want, however I wouldn't recommend packing them full of paste. I think they may be there to help remove excess thermal paste. Remember, the goal of the paste is just to fill the roughness in each surface - not to separate the surfaces. A big glob of paste (such as in the valleys) doesn't really do much for conducting heat away, especially when it is to an unfinned aluminum block.
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September 29, 2010 8:53:04 PM

I just installed my hyper 212+ last night, and the way I've always done it is to just squeeze out some lines around the base of the heatsink, then use the paper that is included and spread it around until the entire flat part of the heatsink is completely covered. Honestly, I doubt there's really that much difference between the different methods, you just want to make sure that you have all the grooves filled in so that your contact area is maximized. Remember: the paste is just there to ensure 100% contact between the heatsink plate and pipes, and the chip. As long as you screw down the heatsink tightly, you should be good to go with any of the methods, as the pressure will spread it out evenly.

As a side note, my idle temps on stock voltage (i think around 1.12V) were 33-38C, depending on the core, and turboboosted single core temp maxed at 44C at 95% load on the single core. I have yet to run any real stress tests though, but so far so good as far as those temps are concerned.
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