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Need help Overclocking i7 930

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October 5, 2010 6:36:24 AM

Hey Everyone.

I just recently finished my first build:

i7 930 2.8 ghz

asus p6T mobo

corsair xms (3 x 2gb) 1600 ddr3 ram (pc12800)

antec earthwatts 750w

msi cyclone gtx 460 1gb

cooler master hyper 212+


I have read the guide on overclocking on Tom's Hardware and I am still a little confused. I am trying to overclock my cpu to about 3.2 ghz which I belive is a fairly small overclock. Right now, I have idle temps around 38 C and load temps at 41, 42C. As you can tell, I do not know what I am doing and would love to have some help and instruction on how to overclock my cpu to about 3.2. What numbers in the bios do I need to change and if possible, can someone help me figure it out? And, if I need to provide data, I can. =]

Also, if anyone can also tell me how to check the voltage on my RAM? And if I can reduce the voltage a bit, how do I do so? Thanks.

More about : overclocking 930

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a b K Overclocking
October 5, 2010 9:55:54 AM

Ok you basically have to understand that Base Clock (bclock) * Multiplier = Clock speed. Your i7 930 has a bclock of 133MHz (all i3/5/7) and a multiplier of 21x.

21 * 133MHz = 2793MHz = 2.8GHz

The multiplier cannot be raised so instead the bclock must be. To get to 3.2GHz then bclock must be raised to 152MHz.

21 * 152MHz = 3192MHz = 3.2GHz

Heres a good read:
http://www.overclockers.com/3-step-guide-overclock-core...

Note that for a small OC like yours you don't really have to find your max bclock (like said in the link) or raise the VTT voltage as any board should run 150MHz will stock settings. My H57 board could get to around 180MHz with stock voltage. Also that link is more for high OCs not like yours but it does give you a bit of an idea.

I reckon you should probably set the bclock to 143MHz to achieve 3GHz. This should boot into windows where you should run Prime 95. While stressing with P95 check your temps with HWMonitor. Run the test for around 20 min and as long as it doesn't crash it is pretty stable.

Hopefully that gives you a bit of an idea, but I'm not overly speced up.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 5, 2010 2:44:10 PM

Depending on your apps you likely will not see any difference running at 3.2GHz. I built several machines using the i5-750 and started my overclock at 3.2GHz. I tested the machines first and recorded the times running SuperPi. Then I overclocked to 3.2 and ran SuperPi again. I got almost the same speed, due to the cpu at stock speed overclocking itself with its turbo mode. Now when you get to 3.4GHz or so you can start to see some speed increase.

You should be able to get your cpu to 3.6, maybe 3.8, pretty easily, but there are a few other settings you will have to change.
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October 6, 2010 4:27:45 AM

cadder said:
Depending on your apps you likely will not see any difference running at 3.2GHz. I built several machines using the i5-750 and started my overclock at 3.2GHz. I tested the machines first and recorded the times running SuperPi. Then I overclocked to 3.2 and ran SuperPi again. I got almost the same speed, due to the cpu at stock speed overclocking itself with its turbo mode. Now when you get to 3.4GHz or so you can start to see some speed increase.

You should be able to get your cpu to 3.6, maybe 3.8, pretty easily, but there are a few other settings you will have to change.


ahh do you know what those settings I need to change would be? I kind of got confused when reading the guide.
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October 7, 2010 5:18:18 AM

http://www.hardocp.com/news/2008/11/05/asus_p6t_ram_oci...

here is a video showing u what to do to get to 3.8GHz on the ASUS P6T. ofc this video is showing one (very simple and general) way to do it but it will give u a small insight on what u will need to mess with in the BIOS. there are a lot of other options which will need manual setting for the best performance without running at high temps, thus lowering the CPUs life expectancy. the only way to do it right is by researching on the web (forums and articles) what all those settings in the BIOS represent. pple will be able to give u some pointers, especially those who have the same motherboard and CPU as u, but in the end u will need to understand what u are doing there in order to do it right.

3.2GHz from 2.8GHz will be unnoticeable, as others before me have stated. i would advise u to enjoy your new system as it is for now and start OCing after u have read some articles/threads on it and understood a little more about them. you have a nice build there which will run very smoothly. u really dont need an OC at this time. dont get discouraged, its really not that complicated, just try to understand the basics of it and everything else will start falling into place :) 

GL!
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 7, 2010 7:08:18 AM

The link I showed tells you the voltages and is good. I will try to explain a bit.

There is a Base Clock which the CPU runs off. To get the CPU speed you multiply the bclock by the multiplier as I said before. To raise the clock speed you must raise the bclock (if using an extreme/black edition you can raise the multiplier instead).

The bclock has a stock value of 133MHz. To raise the base clock to high levels like 180+ the VTT voltage must be increased. The best way to check for base clock stability is to lower the multiplier of the CPU so that it is running slow. This is so that you can eliminate it has a factor, get it? Then you stress the CPU with the desired base clock, if it crashes you up the VTT voltage. This is all explained in the link I presented. How about put a bit of effort in, instead of just saying you don't understand it. You could of just said what you don't understand instead of wanting to get spoon fed, then you might have been able to move forward.

I guess I'm in a bad mood. :) 
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October 8, 2010 5:44:27 PM

thanks for the help everyone =]
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