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How to Avoid Giving Users Local Admin Rights for Autocad

Last response: in Windows XP
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Anonymous
May 12, 2004 1:33:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

I have had an ongoing problem with setting up Autocad so
that users can run the program without having to give them
local administrator rights. The newest versions (2004 and
2005) supposedly don't require it, but I find that, in
reality, they do. It works for a few days, without giving
them local admin rights, and then they start getting
errors that don't go away until I put the user in the
local administrator group. Autocad tech support doesn't
seem to want to help.

More about : avoid giving users local admin rights autocad

Anonymous
May 12, 2004 4:51:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

Most applications weren't designed for this type of multi-user environment.
Such applications need to be installed in each specific user's account to
whom you wish to grant access.

First, be sure the account to which you wish to grant access is set to
administrator and not limited. Install the applications to the same folder
in which it was originally installed. This will look the same as one
install on your hard drive but create the pointers necessary for this user
to have access to the application.

Once the installation is complete, you can return the account to its limited
status if that is what you want and the user should still have access.


--
Michael Solomon MS-MVP
Windows Shell/User
Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

"Mike Lemons" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:c17f01c4383e$ed1ee810$a101280a@phx.gbl...
>I have had an ongoing problem with setting up Autocad so
> that users can run the program without having to give them
> local administrator rights. The newest versions (2004 and
> 2005) supposedly don't require it, but I find that, in
> reality, they do. It works for a few days, without giving
> them local admin rights, and then they start getting
> errors that don't go away until I put the user in the
> local administrator group. Autocad tech support doesn't
> seem to want to help.
Anonymous
May 12, 2004 9:06:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

You can export Autocad registry keys from HKCU of Administrator and merge
this .reg to HKCU of regular user. If needed, adjust regular user
permissions to the appropriate keys.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 12, 2004 11:51:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

Mike Lemons wrote:

> I have had an ongoing problem with setting up Autocad so
> that users can run the program without having to give them
> local administrator rights. The newest versions (2004 and
> 2005) supposedly don't require it, but I find that, in
> reality, they do. It works for a few days, without giving
> them local admin rights, and then they start getting
> errors that don't go away until I put the user in the
> local administrator group. Autocad tech support doesn't
> seem to want to help.

Most applications that are not specifically designed for XP require
users to write files or registry keys in areas that limited accounts
cannot write to.

Specifically, the application folder in Program Files is not writeable
by limited users. Registry keys in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE are not writeable
by limited accounts.

Michael Solomon's advice is good if files and keys only need to be
written once, but sometimes that isn't good enough.

My advice is to give users "modify" access to the Program Files
application folder and if that doesn't work, give them "full control"
over the application keys in HKLM.

Really ancient apps will sprinkle user-writeable files all over the
Windows folder. These programs should be tossed, but if you are
persistent, you can find all the files and keys that need user write
permission.

BTW, the XP rules require that applications put user-writeable files in
the profile Application Data or Local Settings folders. This permits
multiple users to maintain custom settings.

--
Kent W. England, Microsoft MVP for Windows Security
Anonymous
May 13, 2004 5:03:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

And using Regmon and filemon from www.sysinternals.com allows one to identify which keys/files need permissions to be changed.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
And the band played ....
http://www.livejournal.com/users/aldon/74121.html
"Kent W. England [MVP]" <kwe@mvps.org> wrote in message news:u10t0UJOEHA.128@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Mike Lemons wrote:
>
> > I have had an ongoing problem with setting up Autocad so
> > that users can run the program without having to give them
> > local administrator rights. The newest versions (2004 and
> > 2005) supposedly don't require it, but I find that, in
> > reality, they do. It works for a few days, without giving
> > them local admin rights, and then they start getting
> > errors that don't go away until I put the user in the
> > local administrator group. Autocad tech support doesn't
> > seem to want to help.
>
> Most applications that are not specifically designed for XP require
> users to write files or registry keys in areas that limited accounts
> cannot write to.
>
> Specifically, the application folder in Program Files is not writeable
> by limited users. Registry keys in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE are not writeable
> by limited accounts.
>
> Michael Solomon's advice is good if files and keys only need to be
> written once, but sometimes that isn't good enough.
>
> My advice is to give users "modify" access to the Program Files
> application folder and if that doesn't work, give them "full control"
> over the application keys in HKLM.
>
> Really ancient apps will sprinkle user-writeable files all over the
> Windows folder. These programs should be tossed, but if you are
> persistent, you can find all the files and keys that need user write
> permission.
>
> BTW, the XP rules require that applications put user-writeable files in
> the profile Application Data or Local Settings folders. This permits
> multiple users to maintain custom settings.
>
> --
> Kent W. England, Microsoft MVP for Windows Security
Anonymous
May 13, 2004 5:03:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

David Candy wrote:

> And using Regmon and filemon from www.sysinternals.com allows one to
> identify which keys/files need permissions to be changed.
>
Yes, good point, if you have the patience to sift through all the chaff
that scrolls by while looking for the good bits. But sometimes these
tools are the only way to find all the things that need changed permissions.

--
Kent W. England, Microsoft MVP for Windows Security
!