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Question about i5-750 overclock limits

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  • CPUs
  • Overclocking
  • Intel i5
Last response: in Overclocking
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October 15, 2010 4:49:23 PM

Hey guys. So I'm getting a system with an i5-750 CPU (I already have it so don't suggest other CPUs >_>)

It comes with a stock heatsink and fan which don't seem too horrible. What do you think would be a safe overclocking limit? It comes at 2.66 GHz

Also, how would I go about overclocking it?

Thanks for your time

More about : question 750 overclock limits

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a b à CPUs
October 15, 2010 7:15:12 PM

You'll definitely want to buy an aftermarket cooler as the stock heat sink wont get you anywhere. Id recommend the hyper 212+ for around $30 on newegg. Make sure you get some decent thermal compound as the one that comes with it is pretty lousy.

Id say on the stock cooler you wont be able to get past 3.0ghz without heat problems.

Depending on your luck you could reach around 4.0 on the hyper 212+. how much did you want to overclock?
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October 15, 2010 7:24:18 PM

Well I'll probably do like 2.8 GHz for now, and then maybe like 3.5 after I get an aftermarket cooler.
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a b à CPUs
October 15, 2010 7:48:51 PM

Heres a quick guide:

First set all of these in bios:

Intel turbo - disabled
PCIE frequency - 100
Intel speedstep - disabled
intell c-state - disabled
load line calibration - enabled
anything with the words "spread spectrum" - disabled
c1e support - disabled

I'm not sure what your ram frequency is but i'll just assume 1600mhz for now. First, you want to set vram to 1.65 unless its low voltage ram, make sure you check. keep all other voltages to auto except vcore. We'll start by increasing the blck frequency to 147 and the cpu multiplier to x19. That'll put you around 2.8ghz. It'll also increase you ram frequency to 1776 to bump the multiplier down to 10x instead to get 1470. Keep your vcore at around 1.17v for now as this will last us a while.

Now boot up the computer and run prime95 and speedfan. If your computer should crash at this point you need more vcore. If it doesnt crash after ~10 minutes its probably stable enough and we can continue. Also make sure your cpu temp is under 75*C.

Basically keep increase blck frequency 5 or so at a time, and make sure your ram frequency stays under 1600. Boot up and test for stability.

Once you've reached your temp limit or once youve reach a frequency your happy with start lowering your vcore until your system becomes unstable and crashes. Than bump it up one or 2 clicks and keep it at that for optimal performance.

Heres my quick and dirty guide to 3.6ghz:

multiplier 18x
frequency 200
mem multiplier 8x
vcore - ~1.1975


If you want 3.8ghz bump your multiplier to 19x and vcore a couple clicks.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 15, 2010 8:17:32 PM

As a rule one can get a mild to moderate overclock with the stock cooler. This is contingent on good case airflow and the quality of the parts. But usually 10% to 15% is perfectly reasonable even a stock cooler. Just don't go crazy with the voltages.
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a b à CPUs
a c 100 K Overclocking
October 15, 2010 10:13:33 PM

That's one way to OC it... there's others.

I don't suggest keeping IMC/VTT on auto. It has as much effect on stability and temps as Vcore.

It's also my experience that speed step, C states, spread spectrum etc are good to keep on. Call me crazy but I love the idea of turbo boost. Hence why I'm OCed to 3.7ghz with turbo on (for 4.25ghz max). If the OP wants to do this, I recommend disabling LLC as well. LLC is good for a "straight" OC like what bavman posted. That sort of OC is nice and clean (the 200 base clock makes 1600mhz RAM easy).

Turbo boost is more efficient tho. I've had my CPU at 4ghz and I found it only faster in benchmarks, but with 3.7ghz and turbo on it's cooler and for those single threaded apps, definitely going to be faster.

To the original question about stock cooler tho, you might get as much as 3ghz out of it. You really just have to test it out. DO NOT exceed 73C (the spec max is 72.7C). But really, an aftermarket cooler represents a small investment when you're already spending over a grand and it gives a lot back in lower temps (ie: less "wear and tear")
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 16, 2010 3:58:08 AM

I managed to push an E7500 fro 2.93 to 4.07 on the Intel stock cooler of a 65nm chip. Thats a 36% OC. The system is just for playing around with though, it hits like 70C fully loaded.
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October 16, 2010 6:36:02 PM

wolfram23 said:
That's one way to OC it... there's others.

I don't suggest keeping IMC/VTT on auto. It has as much effect on stability and temps as Vcore.

It's also my experience that speed step, C states, spread spectrum etc are good to keep on. Call me crazy but I love the idea of turbo boost. Hence why I'm OCed to 3.7ghz with turbo on (for 4.25ghz max). If the OP wants to do this, I recommend disabling LLC as well. LLC is good for a "straight" OC like what bavman posted. That sort of OC is nice and clean (the 200 base clock makes 1600mhz RAM easy).

Turbo boost is more efficient tho. I've had my CPU at 4ghz and I found it only faster in benchmarks, but with 3.7ghz and turbo on it's cooler and for those single threaded apps, definitely going to be faster.

To the original question about stock cooler tho, you might get as much as 3ghz out of it. You really just have to test it out. DO NOT exceed 73C (the spec max is 72.7C). But really, an aftermarket cooler represents a small investment when you're already spending over a grand and it gives a lot back in lower temps (ie: less "wear and tear")



hi man! a have a question, my CPU is Intel I7 930 (Bloomfield) stuck speed is 2.8 ghz i overclock it to 3.8 Ghz and i bios setting i disable turbo mode. if i will enable it now do i need make any changes on my voltages?
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a b à CPUs
a c 100 K Overclocking
October 16, 2010 7:44:03 PM

Yes, turbo will need a little more Vcore but the VTT/IMC shouldn't have to change. That's why I suggest turning LLC off. You'll set the nominal voltage higher, but under load it drops. With 4 cores (slowest speed) it'll have the lowest voltage usage, up to 1 core (highest speed) using the most voltage.

But for 3.8ghz you're either using 180 or 200 base clock right? You can probably get turbo to work at 180 but 200 there's no way, not without going way above spec voltages.
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October 23, 2010 12:08:23 AM

Best answer selected by Reaper2794.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 25, 2010 4:55:35 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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