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New 1000~eur system, need opinions

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March 11, 2009 2:14:28 PM

Hey,

Im thinking of getting these in few weeks, got around 1k eur budget and the parts currently cost 1150eur. Any suggestions that might improve the "general quality" of the setup?

Asus P6T
Intel Core i7 920 2,66GHz
Corsair Intel Core i7 6GB Kit PC3-10666, 1333MHz, 3x240 DIMM 6GB Kit(3x2048MB)
ASUS EAH4870 DK/HTDI/1GD5
Antec Twelve Hundred
Corsair TX750W TX ATX
Got drives and hd's ready.

Cheers, 0SAlim
March 11, 2009 3:59:02 PM

Look into the ocz platinum set( 3x2gb ). 7-7-7-18 timing, cheap.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

heres a case as well as the 1200. Either is fine.

750tx is a good psu for the i7 choice.

Asus p6t: deluxe.?? they've made many of these types. I think the v2 deluxe is at the top??

the EaH4870 should be just fine, would recommend a sapphire toxic 4870 1gb though, they show out of stock in the u.s.
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March 12, 2009 2:45:12 AM

Very good list.

Are you planning to overclock? If yes, add a cooler to the list.
March 12, 2009 6:59:04 AM

If you want to cut price but not sacrifice on performance/cooling, look at the CM 690 Midtower case, its very roomy for a mid tower and has excellent cooling.

Good sticks of ram for a pretty good price:
http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=MY...

That PSU is way overkill unless you are going to xfire later...if you are then its a good choice.

GTX 260 core 216's are much easier on power consumption if they are 55nm models...

At stock speeds, the 920 doesn't do all that well in games, so get a cooler and OC it if for best gaming results...take a look at this:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/socket-am3-phenom,2...
March 12, 2009 10:59:31 AM

that 750tx is just fine. Wont do any harm to his computer. Dont need to throw a 650w psu into it cause the 750tx has a little more power. If anything at a high wattage, you'll want it in split rails.
March 12, 2009 11:38:00 AM

fullmetall said:
that 750tx is just fine. Wont do any harm to his computer. Dont need to throw a 650w psu into it cause the 750tx has a little more power. If anything at a high wattage, you'll want it in split rails.

Its unnecessary money spent if he won't use 2 gpu's. His current configuration won't use much more than 300w if he overclocks. Single rails are better than split rails.
March 12, 2009 12:15:21 PM

so we got 2 people versing off on railing, proximons guide shows multiple railing being better, you think single being better.

I've been reading on single vs multi aswell, multi is just a single split into groups, limits some of the amp to different places that dont need that much. Multiple railing for gaming/computer programming would probably be better for a higher wattage.
He's got an i7 core build coming up and throwing a 650w will i guess be an ok. If he would to stick in the 750w range i would say get split railing.
March 12, 2009 12:26:54 PM

Yes it limits amps to some places, meaning they cannot be used other places. If you have powerhugry cards, then you want as much amps being able to be diverted to those components as possible, which a single rail can do.
March 12, 2009 12:35:39 PM

Safety. It's done for the same reason that there's more than one circuit breaker in your house's distribution panel. The goal is to limit the current through each wire to what that wire can carry without getting dangerously hot.


But some people claim they can overclock better, etc. with a single +12V rail PSU

B.S. It's a placebo effect. The reality is that their previous PSU was defective or just wasn't as good as their current unit. If the old PSU was a cheap-o unit with four +12V rails and the new one is a PCP&C with one +12V rail, the new one isn't overclocking better because it's a single +12V rail unit. It's overclocking better because the old PSU was crap. It's only coincidental if the old PSU had multiple +12V rails and the current one has just one.

The only "problem" the occurs with multiple +12V rails is that when a +12V rail is overloaded (for example: more than 20A is being demanded from a rail set to only deliver up to 20A), the PSU shuts down. Since there are no "limits" on single +12V rail PSU's, you can not overload the rails and cause them to shut down..... unless you're using a "too-small" PSU in the first place. Single +12V rails do not have better voltage regulation, do not have better ripple filtering, etc. unless the PSU is better to begin with
March 12, 2009 12:36:17 PM

would the video card take over 20A's of the psu?
March 12, 2009 12:55:19 PM

Even if it didn't take over 20A, you don't play with fire there. You want a nice big buffer so the PSU isn't maxed out and dies after a months use. I would not be comfortable running 1 4870 on a 20A rail.
March 12, 2009 1:01:41 PM

Well i wouldn't be comfortable oc'ing and having to worry if the single rail would overload one of my components either. Im running on 4 12v rails and this was built over a year in a half ago on 750w. 4870 + e8500 oc'd to 3.6
March 12, 2009 1:17:40 PM

fullmetall said:
Well i wouldn't be comfortable oc'ing and having to worry if the single rail would overload one of my components either. Im running on 4 12v rails and this was built over a year in a half ago on 750w. 4870 + e8500 oc'd to 3.6

OC'ing the CPU does not make the 12v rail send more power to your other components, just draws more from the rails.
March 12, 2009 1:40:15 PM

In the sli'ing matter would a single rail really take effect over split railing
March 12, 2009 1:49:47 PM

It would depend on the setup, I would prefer a single rail again. Having split rails, you need to manually control what device is hooked up to which rail. If you have one massive 12v rail, you do not need to do this. If the 12v rails are not being used to their full potential, then the extra amps on those rails which would be used elsewhere on a single rail PSU, remain unused, and unavailable if another component needs them.
March 12, 2009 2:02:05 PM

Same with a Single rail, it will use as much amperage as the component needs then the left overs just sit there unused, when one components need more, it will add more, but, if adding more to one component does the psu then try to balance out to the others causing a slight overload?

Which a Multiple rail couldn't do because its already limited.
March 12, 2009 2:19:54 PM

Power draw is a top down force, not bottom up. Think of it as the component taking power from the PSU, not the PSU giving power to the component.

At this point we are splitting hairs though. In reality, both styles of PSU will work fine in a system, but I think the single rail is preferable. Some multi-railed PSU's are linked in a way so that they can share/spread their amperage with other components hooked up to a different 12v rail, this however puts more stress on those other rails.
March 12, 2009 2:46:07 PM

Between PC Power & Cooling 610W at $85 and Corsair 650TX at $80 ... The Corsair is the better deal, because it costs $5 less and offers 3A more and its PCI-E connectors are 6+2 pin rather than just 6-pin. Apart from that, both are based on the same Seasonic design and both are excellent quality.

March 12, 2009 3:05:50 PM

@0salim, are you going to try and crossfire later on or keep it at one card?
March 12, 2009 5:45:28 PM

fullmetall said:
@0salim, are you going to try and crossfire later on or keep it at one card?


Thanks for the tips! Yes, im probably getting another card later when I win at lotto. Any recommendations if I am going for Crossfire later?

Thanks again,

0Salim
March 12, 2009 6:06:37 PM

Yeah, get the 750TX. It has 4 PCI-E connectors and each HD 4870 needs two connectors.
March 12, 2009 6:22:27 PM

aevm said:
Yeah, get the 750TX. It has 4 PCI-E connectors and each HD 4870 needs two connectors.


Kay, thanks! Adding it to the list. A small question (offtopic) about the memory timing; if the package says CL 7-7-7-24 which numbers mean what? Which values should I set to what option? I hope im not going too much offtopic ;) 

Cheers,

0Salim
March 12, 2009 6:23:19 PM

Me and the kid fought over the 750tx and didnt even ask if he was going to xfire :( 

it all came out good in the end though hah.
March 12, 2009 6:30:58 PM

7-7-7-24 is your memory timing's tighter they are(lower the number) the faster.
the bigger the number, the more loose the memory will be.
March 12, 2009 6:31:21 PM

Here's more of a review over it:

timing of 3-4-5-6, the 3 is called your CAS Latency, or CL. This is the time it takes between when a command is sent to the memory, and when the memory starts to reply to that command. Basicly, the time between the processor asking for data and the memory giving the data to the processor. Generaly, this is most important timing.

The 4 in our little timing is called RAS to CAS Delay, or abbreviated as tRCD. This is much more complicated to explain, but is simply the time between accesing a row of data, and accesing corrosponding column of data. This has a lesser effect on performance.

The 5 of our timing is the RAS Precharge, or tRP. This is the time it takes for the memory to disable one line of data and start accesing the next. This also has a lesser effect on performance than CL.

Finaly, the fourth part of a timing, our 6, is the Active to Precharge Delay, abbriviated as tRAS. This is how long the memory has to wait to be accesed again after finishing a command. tRAS has a simmilar effect on performance as that of CL.

Hope that helps, you will want a nice tight timing so, the latency for this i7 is a good value, most CL's are 9.
!