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I7 920 help (bought underclocked??)

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June 14, 2009 6:50:45 PM

I recently bought an i7 920, and I think it was bought underclocked. Note that I don't actually know that much about computers, but judging from this screenshot, my processor is only running at 1.6ghz rather than stock speed of 2.6ghz. Is this because I only have a multiplier of x12? Am I right or am I reading the wrong values?

http://img8.imageshack.us/img8/6443/14086749d.jpg

If my clock IS running slower than stock speed, then how would I go about increasing the multiplier? Did my motherboard (ASUS P6T) automatically set the the multiplier at x12 (e.g. maybe inadequate cooling or power)? If that is the case, then is it even safe for me to increase it?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
a c 309 à CPUs
June 14, 2009 7:08:28 PM

Not to worry, the i7 is just loafing. Run some cpu intensive tasks, like prime95 and you should see the multiplier go up to 21.

You can adjust the minimum and maximum cpu usage percentage in vista/ control panel/power options/advanced settings/processor power management.
June 14, 2009 7:08:30 PM

Just did some experimenting in the BIOS, and I decided to disable "Intel Speedstep Tech" and this got me my x20 multiplier. Is it safe for me to do this, and what exactly is the purpose of this setting?
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a c 309 à CPUs
June 14, 2009 7:22:36 PM

The purpose is to conserve energy and heat when the cpu has little to do. There is no problem in disabling the capability. Overclockers might want to do this, but I see no good reason for the average user to disable the feature.
June 14, 2009 7:30:55 PM

It's safe, but it serves no purpose in your case.

With speedstep enabled, the processor will automatically scale down the speed when there is nothing for it to do anyway, to save power and heat when idle. That's why you see the x12 multiplier, it will scale up again if you put load on the processor.

AFAIK, the setting is primarily because some overclockers prefer to turn it off. I think disabling it is supposed to help with stability at heavy overclocks.
June 14, 2009 7:43:51 PM

Thanks to both for your help, I checked the power management setting and it turns out I had the maximum set at only 50%! oops. However, now when I run a video conversion tool, my cpu temp jumped to 90 celcius (according to ASUS PC Probe 2). Is this a safe temp or have I done something seriously wrong with my heatsink/fan?
June 14, 2009 7:51:42 PM

for some reason I couldnt edit me message.

My heatsink is an Akasa Nero. I do remember having a few problems trying to mount it (one of the pins wouldnt go in properly which meant I lifted it from the processor several times....). I think it may need reseating
June 14, 2009 8:55:52 PM

90 C from Asus PC probe sounds very high.
I suggest you download Real Temp ( http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/ ), I think it gives the most accurate readings of the lot.

Real Temp also displays how many degrees margin you have left until the CPU shuts down from overheating, so if your temperatures are too high, you will see it.
June 14, 2009 9:04:53 PM

Stop... dont even use pc at 90c.I hope that temp is under a load not idle.
Somthing is wrong with heat sink or thermal goo.
Try real temp to confirm those temps.
June 14, 2009 9:11:09 PM

j-g-faustus said:
90 C from Asus PC probe sounds very high.
I suggest you download Real Temp ( http://www.techpowerup.com/realtemp/ ), I think it gives the most accurate readings of the lot.

Real Temp also displays how many degrees margin you have left until the CPU shuts down from overheating, so if your temperatures are too high, you will see it.




It does not tell You at what point it will stop working.What are You talking about?
a b à CPUs
June 14, 2009 9:33:05 PM

Reset your bios settings to default *leaving speed step on*
save and exit bios and go back into it and check your temps in the bios

speedstep is a power saving function - best left on

did you build the PC your self?

oh and thats 90ºc or f?
June 14, 2009 9:35:51 PM

lumpy said:
It does not tell You at what point it will stop working.What are You talking about?


Where it says "Distance to TJ Max"?



According to this post (section 6):
Quote:

a few degrees below Tjunction Max, Throttling is activated... If Core temperatures exceed Tjunction Max, then Shutdown occurs.


And there's the "Thermal status" field. According to the Real Temp documentation:
Quote:
This feature reads information directly from the processor which tells you whether the processor has reached its maximum safe temperature...
If your processor has reached its maximum temperature on any core it will display LOG to indicate that a thermal throttling episode has been logged. If it displays HOT in red then that indicates that a thermal throttling is presently occuring.
a b à CPUs
June 14, 2009 9:36:05 PM

ricster said:
for some reason I couldnt edit me message.

My heatsink is an Akasa Nero. I do remember having a few problems trying to mount it (one of the pins wouldnt go in properly which meant I lifted it from the processor several times....). I think it may need reseating


did you attach the HSF to the motherboard outside the case, or after you already mounted the motherboard?
June 14, 2009 10:00:10 PM

I attached it outside of the case, but one of the pins was stuck halfway so I had to do a LOT of rejigging to fix it. I'm going to order some Arcticlean tomorrow so I can redo the heatsink.

Regarding the Arctic Silver, how much should I be using? I followed the online instructions which said to put a straight line down the middle of the processor, but a few vids on youtube suggest spreading it all out yourself before mounting the HSF.
a c 309 à CPUs
June 14, 2009 11:38:33 PM

I think your temps are too high. Most likely, the cooler is not mounted correctly. Don't worry too much because the cpu will throttle itself if it gets too hot.

Push pin coolers can be tricky to install.
A bad installation can lead to higher temperatures, and even cpu throttling.
With the pc powered down, gently rock the cooler to see if it is on solid, or if it wobbles a bit.
Push pin coolers are best installed while the motherboard is outside of the case.
You need to be able to look at the back of the board to verify that
all 4 pins are completely through and locked.
Play with the pins on the cooler first, so you can see exactly how they work.
Read the Intel instructions that came with your retail cpu.
__________________________When pushing down on the pins, do a diagonal pair first.________________________
If you don't, it is hard to get the last pin in.
Don't forget to clean the parts and reapply fresh thermal compound every time.
Don't try to reuse the TIM.
Rubbing alcohol is OK as a cleaner.
I use a paper coffee filter to clean with because it is lint free.
Any name brand TIM should be OK(as-5, Mx-2, etc.)
When applying the TIM, don't use too much, because it can act as an insulator.
Don't apply too little, either, because it won't spread and fill the microscopic
imperfections in the surfaces. For the i7, there is a picture on the arctic silver web site that shows how to apply it. You put down a very thin line along the longer axis of the cpu die.

---good luck---
a b à CPUs
June 15, 2009 1:00:10 AM

Quote:


AFAIK, the setting is primarily because some overclockers prefer to turn it off. I think disabling it is supposed to help with stability at heavy overclocks.

Correct. With some high OCs you can run in to problems with SpeedStep (at least on the C2D/C2Qs).

@OP: If possible, grab a S1283 (or similer/better) cooler and a bolt in kit. Or you can out the Dremel,washers.springs,etc and mod it.
!