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Another Liquid Cooled build

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October 27, 2010 7:32:02 PM

Hey all,

I've been using Tom's for years when it comes to building computers so I figured I'd sign up and get in on the fun. I'm going to be building my first liquid cooling system in the near future and want to absorb as much info as possible before I make my purchase. My objectives with this cooling system are to get as much out of my i7 930 as possible, and to create a unique all internal build. I built my current set up a month ago and am running everything stock, it's killing me! I plan on just running a single loop for my CPU, maybe expanding later, here are some of the considerations I'm taking.


Care About
1. Cooling Power
2. keep the setup internal

Don't Care About
1. Noise (could care less, will use a fan controller)
2. Price (Would like to come in under $400, but no biggie)
3. Having to do case mods (I have a Xclio a380 with lots of room)

Having said this here is what I'm leaning towards

-Swiftech Apogee xt extreme
-5.25" bay drive reservoir
-Swiftech MCP655-B
-3x120mm radiator + shroud (where I need some advice)
-1/2" tubing

I also just bought 3, 120mm scythe fans that each move 135cfm.

Any and all feedback is appreciated, thanks,

Joe







More about : liquid cooled build

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a c 324 K Overclocking
October 27, 2010 7:40:33 PM
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October 27, 2010 8:10:37 PM




Thanks, that's actually the first thing I read when i started looking. I have a pretty good understanding of thermo dynamics and heat transfer, I'm more interested in learning about, and hearing from you guys about your hardware preferences. Selecting the right components to achieve my goals.
a b K Overclocking
October 27, 2010 10:00:03 PM

jrr02005 said:
Thanks, that's actually the first thing I read when i started looking. I have a pretty good understanding of thermo dynamics and heat transfer, I'm more interested in learning about, and hearing from you guys about your hardware preferences. Selecting the right components to achieve my goals.


I was just looking at your case..if you want to have "unique all internal build" you would have to probably move PSU from power supply unit bay+some moding .
bay res.-
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/8584/ex-res-146/EK_Du...
http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/product_info.php?...

your pump,cpu block, is fine and rad.? just wait for the release of TFC Admiral
October 27, 2010 10:07:01 PM

ortoklaz said:
I was just looking at your case..if you want to have "unique all internal build" you would have to probably move PSU from power supply unit bay+some moding .
bay res.-
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/8584/ex-res-146/EK_Du...
http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/product_info.php?...

your pump,cpu block, is fine and rad.? just wait for the release of TFC Admiral




That,s exactly what I'm looking at having to do. Either that or turn it 90 so it exhaust upward and the power switch would be on the top aswell. I have the same power supply I have in my case now except the 700w version as an extra, i might mess around with relocating the power cord hook up, that would look weird coming out of the top of the case.
a b K Overclocking
October 29, 2010 6:38:55 AM

exactly which a380 case do you have? can you post a link or pic?
a b K Overclocking
October 29, 2010 7:47:53 PM

Are you going to cool the GPU? should be possible with your budget. If you dont have to many PCI cards I would do a dual 120 mm on the bottom (unless you can fit the triple rad) and a 120mm rad on the rear exhaust.

Consider this res/pump combo
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/8852/ex-res-149/Koola...

your loop could go pump/res->cpu->120mm Res->GPU->240 or 360mm Res->pump/res.
a c 324 K Overclocking
October 29, 2010 7:55:34 PM

Eh, I'd argue against it. Not many people big on Koolance pumps/bay res combos. Some of their newer blocks are decent, though.

Go with at least an MCP355 and a custom top like this: http://www.frozencpu.com/products/7272/ex-pmp-63/XSPC_Laing_DDC_Reservoir_Pump_Attachment_w_MCP-350355_No_Fittings.html?tl=g30c107s152

There is a new Swiftech pump out, it hasn't really been reviewed, but it's about the size of the MCP355 and supposedly is more powerful than the MCP655: http://www.frozencpu.com/products/11740/ex-pmp-109/Swiftech_MCP35X_12v_PWM_Controlled_Water_Pump.html?tl=g30c107

There are also some custom top/tanks for these as well.

a b K Overclocking
October 30, 2010 1:59:23 PM

Feser Admiral radiator lineup is slated for late october release. So you might want to look into those but they are definitely going to be expensive so maybe not if you don't have the cash for a $200 3x120 rad.

October 30, 2010 2:59:54 PM

PsyKhiqZero said:
Are you going to cool the GPU? should be possible with your budget. If you dont have to many PCI cards I would do a dual 120 mm on the bottom (unless you can fit the triple rad) and a 120mm rad on the rear exhaust.

Consider this res/pump combo
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/8852/ex-res-149/Koola...

your loop could go pump/res->cpu->120mm Res->GPU->240 or 360mm Res->pump/res.



For the first time around I think I'm going to just do a single loop CPU only build. I'm only running one gtx 470 but it's fine for what I'm doing, I'm not looking to OC it right now.
October 30, 2010 3:04:45 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Eh, I'd argue against it. Not many people big on Koolance pumps/bay res combos. Some of their newer blocks are decent, though.

Go with at least an MCP355 and a custom top like this: http://www.frozencpu.com/products/7272/ex-pmp-63/XSPC_Laing_DDC_Reservoir_Pump_Attachment_w_MCP-350355_No_Fittings.html?tl=g30c107s152

There is a new Swiftech pump out, it hasn't really been reviewed, but it's about the size of the MCP355 and supposedly is more powerful than the MCP655: http://www.frozencpu.com/products/11740/ex-pmp-109/Swiftech_MCP35X_12v_PWM_Controlled_Water_Pump.html?tl=g30c107

There are also some custom top/tanks for these as well.



In regards to the new swiftech pump it's moving slightly less gpm, are you saying it can move water against a given resistance better, sort of a hp vs torque kinda thing? I can see how that would be beneficial when running a big rad or more than one.
October 30, 2010 3:10:27 PM

rofl_my_waffle said:
Feser Admiral radiator lineup is slated for late october release. So you might want to look into those but they are definitely going to be expensive so maybe not if you don't have the cash for a $200 3x120 rad.



yeah I looked at the admiral 3x120 but I didn't know it was going to go for $200, thats a little salty. I could justify that if I saw some good reviews, but not if it's only going to drop your temps by another .5C, not worth the extra $100 imho.

I'm looking for a thick rad, I figure since I have penty of room in the case and some high volume fans I could get away with it.
a b K Overclocking
October 30, 2010 3:41:28 PM

From what I understand pump speed isn't all that important. the faster the water moves through a system, the less heat the molecules pull from the blocks, and the less heat they have to disperse going through the rads. Slower systems will absorb more heat from components, but have more time to disperse the heat going through the rads. So everything sorta balances out. I recently finished my first cpu and gpu loop. as slow as my pump is i'm surprised by how low my temps stay.

Pumps do have a rating called "head" which i guess could be compared to torque. It's how many feet of water a pump could push straight up. this is prolly the more important as I'm sure it relates to the resistance a pump can handle.

As for the custom swifttech top. My concern would be with pump placement. it seems with that top the pump would have to be mounted to the bottom where it could stand straight up. I could be wrong as i'm still a little noobish myself.
October 30, 2010 4:54:13 PM

PsyKhiqZero said:
From what I understand pump speed isn't all that important. the faster the water moves through a system, the less heat the molecules pull from the blocks, and the less heat they have to disperse going through the rads. Slower systems will absorb more heat from components, but have more time to disperse the heat going through the rads. So everything sorta balances out. I recently finished my first cpu and gpu loop. as slow as my pump is i'm surprised by how low my temps stay.

Pumps do have a rating called "head" which i guess could be compared to torque. It's how many feet of water a pump could push straight up. this is prolly the more important as I'm sure it relates to the resistance a pump can handle.

As for the custom swifttech top. My concern would be with pump placement. it seems with that top the pump would have to be mounted to the bottom where it could stand straight up. I could be wrong as i'm still a little noobish myself.



Thats a good point about slower water flow. If you think about it, the bigger the temperature difference between ambient and water temps the more effective your radiator will be at dispercing it. btw I'm leaning towarfds the black ice gtx extreme 360 with a shroud
a b K Overclocking
October 30, 2010 6:39:36 PM

@ OP..sorry to tell you but your case is not the best one for wc, specially if you plan on heaving internal build ,it's still doable but you will be limited to only one triple RAD , remember flow rates and the cold fresh air blowing through the RAD are essential to good setup .The type of rad you want to use is up to you ,do some research on how much heat you want to dissipate/noise
there are better rad's then the one you mention
a b K Overclocking
October 31, 2010 2:25:54 AM

PsyKhiqZero said:
From what I understand pump speed isn't all that important. the faster the water moves through a system, the less heat the molecules pull from the blocks, and the less heat they have to disperse going through the rads. Slower systems will absorb more heat from components, but have more time to disperse the heat going through the rads. So everything sorta balances out. I recently finished my first cpu and gpu loop. as slow as my pump is i'm surprised by how low my temps stay.

Pumps do have a rating called "head" which i guess could be compared to torque. It's how many feet of water a pump could push straight up. this is prolly the more important as I'm sure it relates to the resistance a pump can handle.

As for the custom swifttech top. My concern would be with pump placement. it seems with that top the pump would have to be mounted to the bottom where it could stand straight up. I could be wrong as i'm still a little noobish myself.

Wow.... talk about misinformation. Please verify your info before posting.
a b K Overclocking
October 31, 2010 4:16:26 AM

Actually I don't know if the Feser Admirals is going to be priced $200 for a 360, thats just my guess. But a tiny 120 is definitely $99. Most people agree that is WTF expensive.
a b K Overclocking
October 31, 2010 5:41:02 AM

you learn something new everyday, I stand corrected and apologize for my mistake.
a c 324 K Overclocking
November 1, 2010 1:11:07 PM

Pump head is just as important in a loop as flow rate. Head is the ability for a pump to push a column of water straight up, vertical to it's given maximum; or head. This would be somewhat similar to torque, but flow is also very important. If you are any at all familiar with the MCP355 and 655, you'll know that the 355 actually has more head capability than the 655, but the 655 has more sheer power and ability to maintain higher flows in more restrictive loops.

Think high-torque, inline-6 cyl vs high-revving small block V8.

MCP355: Head (@ 12 V): 20.2 ft (6.1 m)
MCP655: Head: 10 ft (3.1 m)
a b K Overclocking
November 1, 2010 1:31:30 PM

^ Well said. Yes, head is important, but if you don't have have a tall loop (as in pump significantly below block) the head doesn't matter as much as flow rates. Most of these pumps have enough head for a WCing loop.
a c 324 K Overclocking
November 1, 2010 1:41:35 PM

Right, which was mainly my point. For most big, single loops, an MCP655 is the best choice. For dual loops or small cases, MCP355's are a good bet. I'd recommend the 355's with a custom top+res piece like the XSPC ones or similar, they actually benefit the pump more and incorporate a res so you don't need an additional one in the loop.

Plus, easier to prime a pump with a res feeding directly into it.
a b K Overclocking
November 1, 2010 1:47:22 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Right, which was mainly my point. For most big, single loops, an MCP655 is the best choice. For dual loops or small cases, MCP355's are a good bet. I'd recommend the 355's with a custom top+res piece like the XSPC ones or similar, they actually benefit the pump more and incorporate a res so you don't need an additional one in the loop.

Plus, easier to prime a pump with a res feeding directly into it.


Primes easier, but getting the bubble's out was a pita
a c 324 K Overclocking
November 1, 2010 1:51:11 PM

Never used one, but heard a lot of good things about them. What made it more difficult to purge air bubbles vs. other reservoirs? Being so close to the impeller and causing turbulence?
a b K Overclocking
November 1, 2010 1:55:34 PM

Feed tube directly over the inlet didn't allow the bubbles to escape very easily, took more time pinching the tube than I was used to.
November 10, 2010 11:15:42 PM

Best answer selected by jrr02005.
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