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DX 11 on GTX 200 series

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  • Graphics Cards
  • Gtx
  • Directx
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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April 7, 2009 1:19:46 PM

Obviously this year is going to be the transition to Directx 11. Been doing a lot of research and haven't found much right now if this is going to happen. I recently bought a Evga GTX 285 and have been wondering if I made a mistake in buying it as the new Directx 11 comes out. However read somewhere it will support the new DX 11 but have been unable to verify this. Anyone know if these new GTX 200 series are going to be left in the shadows or will they be experiencing the new direct x?

More about : gtx 200 series

a b U Graphics card
April 7, 2009 1:27:24 PM

...we've barely had the transition to DX10. Its not even worth worrying about.
a b U Graphics card
April 7, 2009 3:16:08 PM

No, itll only play the entry level of DX10, nothting higher, except thru emulation, which can cost fps
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April 7, 2009 3:39:21 PM

IMO DX11 games won't start to show up for another 3 years so don't worry !
April 7, 2009 4:10:16 PM

There was an article on DX 11 and it mainly stated that even the DX10 / DX10.1 cards will see benefit from switching to DX11 due to the use of the new API.
So no you did not make a mistake by purchasing your card.

DX11 API will continue with DX10 hardware, and DX10 hardware will support most of the DX11 features. This is the beauty and flexibility fully programmable shaders bring to the table. In fact, with nVidia and ATI embracing unified shaders and transforming most all GPU functions away from fixed-function, we will soon lose the concept that HW must mate up with any particlarly revision of the DirectX API.
Quote from: http://forum.****/software/15388-commentary-dx11.html

and one more article: http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/157/1040157/microsoft-announces-dx11


a b U Graphics card
April 7, 2009 4:44:31 PM

Currently, the difference seen between DX10 and 10.1 shows having the HW compatable shows nice improvements in fps. As having real DX11 will also show these improvements.
As far as one of the biggest "new" things, tesselation, if your card doesnt have it, it wont do it. Maybe can be done with emulation, but I suspect a huge cost would occur trying it
a b U Graphics card
April 7, 2009 7:42:29 PM

It can't be done jaydee. Microsoft, according to its own driver model, requires every DX card to be able to run all DX features, or none at all. A DX10 card can do any DX up to 10, and no higher, period.

That also means that even though ATI's 4000 series has a tesslation unit, they will NOT be able to do any form of DX11.
a b U Graphics card
April 7, 2009 8:07:41 PM

It can be emulated, as we see in a few hacks here n there, tho itd be done on the older model, its a compromise. Maybe the word is immolate? Not the same, but close to it. Like the god rays etc. As for the tessalation, yea it could be emulated, but at a high cost. Itd require one helluva hack tho, unlike the godrays etc, tho itd only be done on ATI HW in only certain games, tho maybe not at all. Cant make something from nothing, this I know
April 7, 2009 8:16:33 PM

gamerk316 said:
It can't be done jaydee. Microsoft, according to its own driver model, requires every DX card to be able to run all DX features, or none at all. A DX10 card can do any DX up to 10, and no higher, period.

That also means that even though ATI's 4000 series has a tesslation unit, they will NOT be able to do any form of DX11.


The bottom line is does anyone really care? DX11 games wont be really out for another two three years min, and by than there will be much more powerful CPUs and GPUs. So, yeah you can wait for another three years, or you can just get yourself a card now and enjoy the current games....

We are already in the, what? Third year of DX10 development? and we are just starting to see some games that use DX10. Most of the games on the market are DX9. The same will happen with the DX11 games.
I doubt that any of the first DX10 cards that showed up on the market can run Crysis at 1920x1080 in its full glory, so will be the same with the first DX11 cards that come out. Yes you can shell out another $300 - $400 dollars and get them, but by the time a DX 11 game comes out you might as well upgrade that card or get another one to run it in SLI or Crossfire.

Edit: Also with introduction of Programmable GPUs soon there wont be such thing as DX11, DX12 hard coded GPUs. You should be able to re program the GPU to do the specific API instructions by means of only new BIOS and Driver update.
a b U Graphics card
April 7, 2009 8:16:42 PM

I need more coffee today. Ughhhhhh
Youre most likely right about the tesselation thing, but as for lighting and shading things, older models can "emulate" them, with hacks that is
a b U Graphics card
April 7, 2009 8:19:57 PM

I dont think you can apply the implementation of DX10 to DX11. Too many things changed just for DX10 that held up its adaptation. Those things already exist for DX11, and wil be implemented much quicker, tho not right away. Itll be more like the DX8 to DX9 time frame, or possibly even quicker
a b U Graphics card
April 7, 2009 8:30:57 PM

Quote:
The complexity of the upgrade, however, is mitigated by the fact that this is nothing like the wholesale changes made in the move from DX9 to DX10: DX11 is really just a superset of DX10 in terms of features. This enables the ability for DX11 to run on down-level hardware (where DX11 specific features are not used), which when combined with the enhancements to HLSL with OOP and dynamic shader linking mean that developers should really have fewer qualms about moving from DX10 to DX11 than we saw with the transition from DX9. (Of course, that's nothing new: the first DX8 games shipped when DX9 was out, and it wasn't until DX10 that we saw a reasonable number of DX9 titles.)



http://www.anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=3507&p=8
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