Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

The more I read about overclocking the sandy bridge, the less I like

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
November 10, 2010 2:58:12 PM

Just throwing something out there for discussion.

I'm not sure what to trust out there on the internet. I've seen "Intel gets 4.9 ghz on air" mentioned in one article, and another article speculating that only one core was active and operating during that product demonstration. Other articles mention that the multiplier rate is way up, over 40 even to 45 with the FSB dropped to 100 MHz. It just seems too foreign to me and I guess I just can't get used to seeing those numbers in the specs that are published online.

Even more articles are suggesting that "getting to speed X" on air does not mean that you can get to "X + Y" on water or other deeper cooling methods. That implies there is a plateau that you hit and then that's it, you can't overclock being that, even if you had an absolute zero cooling system.

Have I just been reading some bad internet press? What are some of your expert opinions on the matter?
a b å Intel
a c 197 K Overclocking
November 12, 2010 9:08:56 PM

What I have been reading indicates that the basic CPU's have sort of a unified clock that prevents the chip from being overclocked. And the "K" models have unlocked multipliers.

I am not too worried about it. My C2Q gaming machine still has plenty of life in it. I can afford to wait and see what will happen.
m
0
l

Best solution

a b å Intel
a c 125 K Overclocking
November 13, 2010 3:06:16 AM

I think sandy bridge will be a blockbuster.

Overclocking as we know it is gone, but the "K" models actually make it simpler. Just raise the multiplier until you hit the thermal wall. That wall will be higher with 32nm chips.

If your app is momentarily not using all cores, the remaining active cores get increased power.

On a clock for clock basis, you will see a 15% improvement.

A good prefiew article from a knowledgeable source:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/3871/the-sandy-bridge-pre...
Share
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
a c 242 K Overclocking
November 13, 2010 4:29:36 AM

demontration OC extreme use hardware sample engineering in fact we use waste product for OC :pfff: 
m
0
l
November 13, 2010 1:34:38 PM

henydiah said:
demontration OC extreme use hardware sample engineering in fact we use waste product for OC :pfff: 


What the?! What language is this?
m
0
l
November 13, 2010 1:37:23 PM

geofelt said:
I think sandy bridge will be a blockbuster.

Overclocking as we know it is gone, but the "K" models actually make it simpler. Just raise the multiplier until you hit the thermal wall. That wall will be higher with 32nm chips.


And I wonder how much moreso when the 22 nm chips come out?


geofelt said:

On a clock for clock basis, you will see a 15% improvement.


Compared to what though? Not the gulftown, or is that what you mean?

geofelt said:

A good prefiew article from a knowledgeable source:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/3871/the-sandy-bridge-pre...


Yeah I read that one already, thanks. Good information.
m
0
l
a b å Intel
a c 125 K Overclocking
November 13, 2010 4:56:53 PM

The sandy bridge architecture changes will improve performance, compared to today's i3/i5/i7 processors. It is not the 32nm process.
m
0
l
November 21, 2010 4:11:50 AM

Best answer selected by AllanCameron.
m
0
l
!