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I7 975 vesus 920

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June 23, 2009 12:59:46 PM

All,

Will a I7 975 overclock higher than a 920? What I am getting at is what is the best I7 to get to go for the highest stable and usable overclock?

Thanks,

John

More about : 975 vesus 920

June 23, 2009 1:32:55 PM

a good 920 will hit 4.65ghz, a good 975 will hit 5.1ghz, 5.2 if you're lucky.

these are on air, but if you're on a good water cooling setup then expect an extra 200-500mhz extra providing you have a good CPU.
June 23, 2009 5:19:11 PM

Thanks,
Are these OC's stable and reliable to be used on a system that will stay running nearly all the time and won't be attended all the time?

Also is a chipset cooler important to use when OCing like this? Ram ccoler?

Thanks,
John
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June 23, 2009 7:18:06 PM

Helloworld_98 said:
a good 920 will hit 4.65ghz, a good 975 will hit 5.1ghz, 5.2 if you're lucky.

these are on air, but if you're on a good water cooling setup then expect an extra 200-500mhz extra providing you have a good CPU.

Those are pretty unlikely numbers. I'd say a good 920 will hit 4.2-4.3, while a good 975 might get into the high 4s.
June 24, 2009 3:18:33 AM

John_R said:
Thanks,
Are these OC's stable and reliable to be used on a system that will stay running nearly all the time and won't be attended all the time?

Also is a chipset cooler important to use when OCing like this? Ram ccoler?

Thanks,
John


Anything above 5.2 i wouldn't consider as very stable because of how much stress it puts on many different elements of the machine.There is an article which points out the benefits and down sides to OC'ing that much. I would not recommend as the article also says to overclock over 3.6 as the practical benefits go down.

Core i7 overclocking practicality article

3.6 is easily achievable on a 920, i personally wouldn't waste the money unless you're very serious about OC'ing
Anonymous
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February 16, 2010 11:23:20 PM

I like the idea of people buying i7 920 (2.66 stock) and over clocking to mid 3.s and low 4.s.
People tend to forget that you are over clocking.. even though you can get the 920s to be the same speed if not faster then the stock 975, you are still over clocking... Take the 920 for example, stock speed 2.66 lets turn them into two different cars. 55mph for stock 2.66 is the set cruise speed. take the 975, 3.33 lets just say with out ratio or anything the set cruise speed on 975 is somewhere around 75-80mph. Sure the 920 can step on the gas and reach the speed of the 975 and maintain that speed. It can even step on the gas even more and pass the 975 in speed. It can reach a stable 100mph sure with the correct cooling why not... but we all know, both cars have different engine under the hood. Just remember with over clocking, its great fun and get the most out of the chip/engine, but it will also wear it down and burn it out faster.
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February 16, 2010 11:31:05 PM

but remember, even if we do OC it, it only takes off a few years and these chips,if taken care of , can last ten years or so. And as we all know, with the hdw advancing so rapidly these days, itll become obsolete in 4-5 years and relegated to second line work.

I know for sure, my i7 is going to be a backup computer in 4 years when i get an 6-8 core cpu.
Anyways

The practical OC is somewhere between 3.6-4.0. Any higher is just for the e-peen. You dont get any major increases except in your electrical bills, An 920-975 is the same chip, its just their quality wise with the best being the xeons and the average best the 920s...

In the end, id take a 920 to OC... seriously though, if your running 24/7, leave it in the mid 3's to high 3's. Yeppers
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February 17, 2010 12:26:31 AM

lilotimz said:
but remember, even if we do OC it, it only takes off a few years and these chips,if taken care of , can last ten years or so. And as we all know, with the hdw advancing so rapidly these days, itll become obsolete in 4-5 years and relegated to second line work.

I know for sure, my i7 is going to be a backup computer in 4 years when i get an 6-8 core cpu.
Anyways

The practical OC is somewhere between 3.6-4.0. Any higher is just for the e-peen. You dont get any major increases except in your electrical bills, An 920-975 is the same chip, its just their quality wise with the best being the xeons and the average best the 920s...

In the end, id take a 920 to OC... seriously though, if your running 24/7, leave it in the mid 3's to high 3's. Yeppers


I am starting to get pissed at noobs coming on these forums and talking about 'chips last this long' and 'overclocking takes x amount of years off a chips life' and blah blah BLAH FRIGGIN BLAH.

Let me point something out to you lilotimz so you can stop spewing the same garbage.

1) Processors do not have a 'shelf life' - they are not food products. You, nor Intel, nor AMD, nor IBM knows how long their chips will last. It could be 1 year, it could be 500. Chances are, however, that if a chip passes an Intel/AMD/IBM/whatever hardware stress test then it is going to perform well beyond 10 years like you stated. I still have an Intel 450 mgh celeron running for Christs sake. Do not go back to the safety of 'oh well it will be obsolete haha so don't worry about overclocking!' and right before it talk about the dangers of overclocking.

2) The only danger when overclocking is VOLTAGES. That is IT. If you overvolt = immediate death to your cpu

3) The only other thing (and this is ULTRA ULTRA ULTRA ULTRA ULTRA rare) is when a CPU needs more vcore to run at its stock speed. That is a sign of a 'cpu' slowly dieing but in this case you can pretty much guarantee that you will have a dead chip soon.

You know what is funny, though? I have overclocked ALL of my computers and not one of them has friggin died. To this date I still have an overclocked AMD Barton running and IT has still not died. Please explain to me where you get your so called numbers and data from because I have seen a fresh wave of imbeciles come on here talking about how overclocking kills your computer faster. Well IT DOES NOT. It is only speculation on your end. I am a SAFE overclocker and my chips LAST.
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February 17, 2010 3:08:31 AM

werxen - your statement isn't quite accurate. Temperatures can also be bad. Electromigration (what kills modern CPUs over time) is dependent on both voltage and temps, so you want to keep your temperatures reasonable (<75C or so) as well. Other than that, I agree with everything you said.
Anonymous
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a b K Overclocking
February 17, 2010 4:46:37 AM

werxen said:
I am starting to get pissed at noobs coming on these forums and talking about 'chips last this long' and 'overclocking takes x amount of years off a chips life' and blah blah BLAH FRIGGIN BLAH.

Let me point something out to you lilotimz so you can stop spewing the same garbage.

1) Processors do not have a 'shelf life' - they are not food products. You, nor Intel, nor AMD, nor IBM knows how long their chips will last. It could be 1 year, it could be 500. Chances are, however, that if a chip passes an Intel/AMD/IBM/whatever hardware stress test then it is going to perform well beyond 10 years like you stated. I still have an Intel 450 mgh celeron running for Christs sake. Do not go back to the safety of 'oh well it will be obsolete haha so don't worry about overclocking!' and right before it talk about the dangers of overclocking.

2) The only danger when overclocking is VOLTAGES. That is IT. If you overvolt = immediate death to your cpu

3) The only other thing (and this is ULTRA ULTRA ULTRA ULTRA ULTRA rare) is when a CPU needs more vcore to run at its stock speed. That is a sign of a 'cpu' slowly dieing but in this case you can pretty much guarantee that you will have a dead chip soon.

You know what is funny, though? I have overclocked ALL of my computers and not one of them has friggin died. To this date I still have an overclocked AMD Barton running and IT has still not died. Please explain to me where you get your so called numbers and data from because I have seen a fresh wave of imbeciles come on here talking about how overclocking kills your computer faster. Well IT DOES NOT. It is only speculation on your end. I am a SAFE overclocker and my chips LAST.




Not really speculation, you just happen to be the few that is fortunate. It's like saying I won the lottery and I'm wealthy.. why isn't everyone else rich? type statement. Just because you have been successful in your past endeavor does not make it a true generalization on the subject. Lets say you bought two of the same cpu and built two of the same machine, one you over clocked and pushed to the limits and ran if just as much as the one that is not over clocked. Basic phyics and wear and tear will show that you are putting more stressed on the cpu that you have over clocked and probably would have taken greater care in noticing if it is over heating, if you need to add some sort of additional support for it to last longer. Take two Honda Civics one cruising at 55mph and the other cruising at 100mph... same law of wear and tear applies.
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a b K Overclocking
February 17, 2010 6:45:12 AM

Your continuation of using a auto analogy with processors is fail. You are comparing mechanical friction to electronics is totally inaccurate !!

Quote:
Take two Honda Civics one cruising at 55mph and the other cruising at 100mph... same law of wear and tear applies.

No , it most surely does not. And I challenge you to find a link anywhere stating anything close to that. Your engine has piston rings, crank and connecting rod bearings. Valve springs and seals. You lose compression and power after extended use. Your cpu will most certainly outlive all the electronic components in your pc as long as it might be useful to you.
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