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SATA to IDE adapter

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October 15, 2010 7:48:20 AM

The IDE hard drive in my older laptop failed. I want to replace it with a SATA drive because I'll get more gigs per dollar than with an IDE drive, and because I'll be able to use it, at some point, with my newer laptop. I have found an adapter that will fit into the hard drive bay, but of course there is no room for the hard drive. Assuming all the proper connections--ribbon cable, power cable, etc.,--is it feasible to operate a properly connected hard drive outside of the hard drive bay?

More about : sata ide adapter

a b D Laptop
a c 104 G Storage
October 15, 2010 4:48:47 PM

Hello,

If your commercial laptop HDD failed, you need to replace it with the same type of drive as per the manufacturer's specs. The size and rotational speed can be different, but you can't replace a PATA with a Serial HDD, or a PATA to SATA adapter and SATA HDD in the fixed space.

You will then have to use the restore disks to install the OS and application programs that came with your laptop originally, to this new HDD.
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a b D Laptop
a c 415 G Storage
October 15, 2010 6:14:25 PM

mchlgn said:
Assuming all the proper connections--ribbon cable, power cable, etc.,--is it feasible to operate a properly connected hard drive outside of the hard drive bay?
Yes, if you can snake all of the connections past the circuit boards and through the case somehow, the drive will certainly work externally. Of course this really compromises portability, and you'd want to be extra careful that you don't cause any shocks to the drive while it's operating. Watch out for exceeding the maximum IDE cable length (18").

If your laptop has something like a DVD drive bay and you don't need the DVD drive, you could try removing it and duct-taping the drive in the remaining space. But you'd have to be careful - the airflow through the case may not provide adequate cooling for the drive if it's not where it was designed to be.
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October 16, 2010 8:38:15 AM

John_VanKirk said:
Hello,

If your commercial laptop HDD failed, you need to replace it with the same type of drive as per the manufacturer's specs. The size and rotational speed can be different, but you can't replace a PATA with a Serial HDD, or a PATA to SATA adapter and SATA HDD in the fixed space.

You will then have to use the restore disks to install the OS and application programs that came with your laptop originally, to this new HDD.


John,

First of all, thanks for your response. I'm not arguing with you because I truly don't know, but if this were a desktop would this space problem be an issue? And but for the space problem, isn't replacing a PATA with a SATA and vice versa the reason for the existence of such adapters? What I'm asking is, space restrictions notwithstanding, is there something unique about laptops that make this kind of adaptation unworkable?
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October 16, 2010 8:54:08 AM

sminlal said:
Yes, if you can snake all of the connections past the circuit boards and through the case somehow, the drive will certainly work externally. Of course this really compromises portability, and you'd want to be extra careful that you don't cause any shocks to the drive while it's operating. Watch out for exceeding the maximum IDE cable length (18").

If your laptop has something like a DVD drive bay and you don't need the DVD drive, you could try removing it and duct-taping the drive in the remaining space. But you'd have to be careful - the airflow through the case may not provide adequate cooling for the drive if it's not where it was designed to be.


sminlal,

I understood those would be the issues to deal with, assuming it would work at all. As far as portability is concerned, it has seldom moved from one spot since I bought it, so it won't be an added inconvenience for it not to be moved in the future. I was also thinking about giving it a dedicated laptop cooler to deal with the air flow issue.
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a b D Laptop
a c 415 G Storage
October 16, 2010 6:27:57 PM

If you find some space inside the laptop case to stow the drive with it's adapter, the laptop cooler may or may not help the drive. It's not just how much air is being sucked through the case, it's about about where the air goes. In fact, cooler aside, removing the drive from it's normal spot could conceivably cause something else to run hotter because the drive itself may have funnelled air along a certain path.

I'm not saying the cooler is a bad idea, just that you have to exercise some caution. The guts of a laptop are pretty tightly packed and the designers have to go to a fair bit of trouble to make sure the airflow keeps everything from overheating. Moving stuff around in the case is something that needs to be done carefully.
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October 18, 2010 10:05:35 PM

I wasn't considering installing it inside the case, but securing it freestanding outside the case with a separate laptop cooler/fan . The adapter itself would occupy most of the space inside the drive bay, so I wouldn't be moving anything around per se, rather substituting one thing, the adapter, for another, the hard drive. The way the laptop in question is built, the hard drive bay is a separate compartment with a separate lid. The IDE port is the only part of motherboard visible from inside the bay.
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a b D Laptop
a c 415 G Storage
October 19, 2010 4:31:42 PM

You're probably good to go, then!
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