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DDR3 24GB ram

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September 7, 2009 10:53:54 PM

Hello, I just started doing research into the next system im going to build and ran into a cunundrum. Just like when DDR2 came out there seems to be a shortage of large capacity ram kits (for home computing anyway). Now I am planing on buying some ECC registered server memory in 6 4GB sticks to max out my MB's ram. howeaver i cant find a single post where anyone has used registered ram in these X58 chipsets. My question is since ALL of the 4-8GB kits of DDR2 and DDR3 are non-regestered, non ecc ram IS the X58 designed to properly read registered memory. Given how registered ram has its own addressing and the NB will just see the solid sticks as opposed to individual registers that i needs to manage and refresh.

I do alot of video gaming and 3d rendering wich is why i like having the ram. also I use a ramdisk program to load my rediculasly large games and projects into for faster transfer rates and fetch times.

More about : ddr3 24gb ram

a c 81 } Memory
September 8, 2009 12:03:47 AM

Don't you need a 5500 chipset which requires Xeon CPUs to use registered memory?
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September 8, 2009 12:35:32 AM

damn, well that sucks... anyone know when they will come out with a kit for DDR3 tri channel larger thain 6GB? im at 8GB now and I run out all the time... i could never live on 6..
a c 81 } Memory
September 8, 2009 1:01:16 AM

They are available from Crucial and probably others, but most seem to be Registered ECC.
September 8, 2009 1:20:10 AM

i did not see that 3X4 kit from kingston last time i checked.. that is what i was looking for. alliteratively I haven't looked into Xeon for a gaming machine since 04. Anyone got some good links or opinions on that?
September 8, 2009 1:25:13 AM

The Nehalem based Xeons support ECC. You could get a 3500 series CPU if you really want ECC.
September 8, 2009 1:26:26 AM

ncc74656 said:
i did not see that 3X4 kit from kingston last time i checked.. that is what i was looking for. alliteratively I haven't looked into Xeon for a gaming machine since 04. Anyone got some good links or opinions on that?


I'm fairly certain you can use a 3500 series Xeon in an X58 mobo.
September 8, 2009 1:35:46 AM

the Intel Xeon W3550 Bloomfield is a 1366 socket as are some 5XXX series, has anyone seen any benchmarks comparing these to a standard I7?
September 8, 2009 1:46:00 AM

Hexus.net headline reads:

Kingston teases 4GB DDR3 modules, slaps 24GB into a Core i7 system


There is a video here also, with RAM specifics:

http://www.hexus.net/content/item.php?item=17187

The 4GB of DDR2 memory in my personal system continues to serve me well, but if you're the kind of user that eats RAM for breakfast, you're gonna enjoy watching Kingston Technology's latest tech demo.

Using GIGABYTE's GA-EX58 UD5 motherboard, Intel's Core i7 920 processor, NVIDIA graphics and half-a-dozen 4GB ValueRAM DDR3 engineering samples, it's showing off the 24GB DDR3 desktop. If you're inclined to simultaneously run numerous virtual machines, take a look:

It's a fun little teaser for a Friday morning, but don't expect 4GB DDR3 modules until later in the year. Worth noting, too, that Kingston claims its pre-production 24GB kit (6x4GB) cost over $2,000 to produce. Ouch.

[end quote]


MRFS
a c 81 } Memory
September 8, 2009 1:46:52 AM

You can compare them at Intel. The W3550 is an i7-950 with ECC memory support.
September 8, 2009 1:53:05 AM

ECC Registered 3 x 4GB DDR3:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...

At "Customer Reviews" see:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Other Thoughts: Used with Supermicro X8DAH+ with 6 modules and Xeon L5520.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Pros: I am using this memory in a Supermicro dual-socket Nehalem server; the SYS-6016T-NTRF. I ran Memtest overnight and there were no errors, as expected.




Unbuffered non-ECC 3 x 4GB DDR3:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


MRFS
September 8, 2009 2:00:49 AM

> I use a ramdisk program

Which ramdisk software are you using?


> has anyone seen any benchmarks comparing these to a standard I7?

I don't remember that specific comparison, but
Google "Nehalem +Xeon +server +review"
and I'll bet you'll find plenty of benchmarks
(45,200 "hits" as of today :) 

I do remember reading quite a few glowing reviews
of the Nehalem Xeons, when they were first released.


MRFS
September 8, 2009 2:14:34 AM

Given the price of 4GB modules, ECC or not, wouldn't it be easier to drop the ramdisk, get only 12GB RAM and get a SSD instead???
September 8, 2009 2:41:26 AM

Do the math:

Nehalem EP triple-channel memory bandwidth
starts at 25,000 Megabytes per second, and
goes up from there with overclocked RAM.

The bandwidth of SSD interfaces is still 300 Megabytes per second,
soon to increase to 600 MB/second (SATA/6G / 10 bits per byte).

We have a 4-year-old ramdisk that consistently READs
3 GB/second, measured by PerformanceTest version 4.0.

We're waiting for SSDs with SATA/6G interfaces,
e.g. to wire to Intel's RS2BL080 SAS/6G RAID controller.

Even with 4 such SSDs in RAID0, however, the maximum
raw bandwidth is still only 600 x 4 = 2,400 MB/second
and that assumes no controller overhead at either
end of the data cable.


MRFS
September 8, 2009 3:22:52 AM

ncc74656 said:
the Intel Xeon W3550 Bloomfield is a 1366 socket as are some 5XXX series, has anyone seen any benchmarks comparing these to a standard I7?


The 5xxx series is for dual processor servers. If you want an X58 board to run SLI or CrossFire, you'll need an i7 or 35xx series. Make sure the Xeon is on the CPU support list for the mobo you want though. I just did a quick check on Gigabyte's site, and their boards support Xeons.

It'd be interesting to Triple channel memory with ECC. You most likely won't take a performance hit from ECC because the triple channel memory already offers more than enough bandwidth.
a c 81 } Memory
September 8, 2009 3:45:23 AM

While the X58 chipset supports the Xeon W3550, it doesn't support registered ECC memory. Getting 24 GB of unbuffered memory to run stable can be challenging and very expensive. Using a 5500 chipset based motherboard with a single Xeon 55xx CPU and 24 GB of registered RAM would not be more expensive and probably more stable.
September 8, 2009 4:58:32 AM

i currently use Qsoft 64 enterprise. I started using it on my old comp because i had a 9600GT 512MB video card and i wanted to play farcry2 maxed out. while the GPU, shaders, and memory could all process the frames the 512MB on the card was an issue as the system was constiantly trying to swap out textures and i had hella lag. so i loaded the whole game into a 3.5GB ram drive i made since i had 8GB of ram and with alittle overclocking got the card to run the game maxed out with about 32fps average. playable to me

I run windows 7 64
a b } Memory
September 8, 2009 12:04:50 PM

Wouldn't it be a hell of a lot cheaper to get a 2GB GTX 285 and be done with it? That seems like a tremendous expense for a "problem" with a vastly simpler solution.
September 8, 2009 6:06:13 PM

i was unemployed at the time and had no money, thus why i had to figure out a work around. and the ram disk solution was free, just took some time is all.
!