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Northbridge cooling - GA-MA770-UD3

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  • Gigabyte
  • Cooling
  • Compatibility
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Motherboards
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September 13, 2009 6:13:03 PM

I have a GA-MA770-UD3 and want to get an aftermarket Northbridge cooler but figuring out compatibility is proving to be difficult to say the least. Any recommendations? I haven't decided passive vs active, just know I need to get some cooling on there, any help from someone with experience with the board or knowledge of Northbridge cooling would be greatly appreciated

More about : northbridge cooling ma770 ud3

September 13, 2009 6:30:29 PM

At one point I bought an Tt Extreme Spirit II northbridge cooler and put it on a very hot running intel 945p chipset. My board was actually very much like yours in layout and dimensions. In my experience, the $20-30 you'll spend on a good one is really not that necessary. If you have deemed that you really do need to get better cooling on the chipset (they usually run pretty hot anyways) then,

What I'd do instead is get a fan and aim it straight at the heatsink. Looking at the heatsink it doesnt look like you could stick a 40mm fan on it so you might want to check out the antec spotcool fan. It clips on to your case somewhere and then you can bend the arm to point at anything in the case. It'll probably lower temps by a bunch.
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September 13, 2009 6:39:20 PM

interestingly enough at one point I mounted a 60mm fan to the hard drive cages pointed directly at the Northbridge and what I found was the direct cooling my have helped slightly however because of the volume of air coming from the two 120mm fans up front the fan just chopped along, running extremely slowly trying to grip the air that was already coming in at high speed, essentially overwhelmed in the end it just proved to be an obstruction for the air already entering the case. I do however very much appreciate the idea
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September 14, 2009 12:59:48 AM

I just double checked on mine and found that right now with my computer coding a DVD and doing some web surfing the NB is running at 78°c, from my research it appears that most if not all of this model run that hot though not because they are designed to but because the NB heatsink just isnt up to the task of cooling it.
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September 19, 2009 11:34:25 PM

Hi
I've got the same MB and temp of 78'c is from the mosfet and not the NB only found that out after a lot of research and contract with gigabyte.
All temp monitoring software I tried report it as the NB but its reported wrong, it seems to be a peculiarity with some gigabyte MB and the way temperature sensors configuration is set-up.
Hope this helps
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a c 177 V Motherboard
September 19, 2009 11:50:28 PM

Could you please quote GB's message here? This is a matter of long-standing curiosity and debate - every scrap of info helps...
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September 20, 2009 12:30:31 PM

Hi
Don't have the email any more (had to reinstall after hdd failure) but has to do with the temperature sensors chip and the way its set-up on some of there MB.
Just wish I still had the email to show you all.
After they told me that I put some ram heatsinks on the mosfet and it dropped temps by 3-4'c if that helps.
This was over 3months ago and it took about 2months to get a answer sending the 2-3 emails a week there email support is bad in english.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
September 20, 2009 1:21:03 PM

This is the only official GB statement I have regarding fan headers:

"CPU_FAN connector needs a CPU cooler with four wires were the PWM modulator is included in the cooler. The mobo senses the CPU temperature and managing the pin 4 signal, the cooler's fan will automatically be increased or decreased, following the CPU temp. Fan's rotation feedback returns via pin 3 for BIOS alarm feature.

SYS_FAN2 connector needs any fan, with three or four wires (don't care) since the speed is controlled via on-board PWM controller that supply pulse-width-modulated 12v for the fan via pin 2. So, if using a four wire fan, its internal PWM is locked to full speed (this explain that fixed 5v on pin 4). This time, the mobo senses the North Bridge (in my case the P35) temperature and will increase or decrease the speed of the fan connected in this socket. Feedback is sent to pin 3 for BIOS alarm purposes.

SYS_FAN1 and PWR_FAN are three pin socket with fixed full speed fan. No controlled rotation at all from the mobo. Rotation feedback also monitored via pin 3 only for BIOS alarm purpose."

Quote:
their email support is bad in english

That's an understatement, if ever I saw one! On the other hand, I've been trying to learn Mandarin, and I frankly don't know how the Chinese ever leard to read and write before they're fifty! There are, I believe, over twenty-thousand characters/symbols, of which they regularly use some six-thousand or so; they come in singlets and pairs (many 'words' are two characters, so you have to know if you're looking at one character or a pair); every syllable has four intonations: falling, rising, falling/rising, or flat, and each of the intonations is a different word (or half a word...), with a different character! I figure, in five years or so, I might be able to ask 'where is the bathroom', if I'm lucky, and work hard! On the syntactic side, the language is very 'sparse', and direct, and makes their poetry particularly, and hauntingly, beautiful...
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