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Is 1:1 the best ratio between FSB and RAM?

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a b à CPUs
July 1, 2009 5:44:27 PM

What's the best ratio between FSB and RAM? Thank you!

More about : ratio fsb ram

a b à CPUs
July 1, 2009 11:13:45 PM

Also, which one is better, E8200 or E6850? Thanks.
a c 172 à CPUs
July 2, 2009 10:55:34 AM

I run 1:1 which for DDR2 means a memory clock twice as fast as the FSB.

E8200.
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a b à CPUs
July 2, 2009 11:32:20 AM

jsc said:
twice as fast as the FSB

1333MHz x2? Can it be done?
July 2, 2009 11:46:48 AM

The FSB is quad pumped, so 1333 MHz is actually 333 MHz, so double that is 666 MHz, it's perfectly possible.
a b à CPUs
July 2, 2009 1:10:55 PM

SirCrono said:
The FSB is quad pumped, so 1333 MHz is actually 333 MHz, so double that is 666 MHz, it's perfectly possible.

What about duo core one? 1200MHz? Thanks
July 2, 2009 4:01:44 PM

1200mhz base?, yeah, you aren't getting that.


1200mhz FSB then yeah you can do it, just put your FSB up or down to 300Mhz.
a c 110 à CPUs
July 2, 2009 4:46:33 PM

andy5174 said:
Also, which one is better, E8200 or E6850? Thanks.


Whichever is least expensive - they are effectively equal from the benchies I've seen with a slight nod to the e6850.
July 2, 2009 5:47:12 PM

In my P.C it is 1:2
July 2, 2009 6:22:34 PM

1:1 with a 333fsb (1333MHz quadpumped) CPU is DDR 667 ram running at rated speed, which is close to the slowest ram you can get anymore.
a b à CPUs
July 3, 2009 9:26:07 AM

Helloworld_98 said:
1200mhz base?, yeah, you aren't getting that.


1200mhz FSB then yeah you can do it, just put your FSB up or down to 300Mhz.

So all the C2D/C2Q CPUs are quad pumped? I thought C2D is duo pumped and therefore the 666MHz mentioned by me. Thanks for correcting my misunderstanding.
a c 172 à CPUs
July 3, 2009 1:48:18 PM

No. All the Core2's are quad pumped. It's basically a 1:2:4 ratio of FSB: memory clock: bus clock.

Running the memory clock at less than 1:2 forces the CPU to wait for memory, and therefore costs performance. Running the memory clock faster than 1:2 seems to yield little, if any, real world performance.
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