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50 inch panasonic plasma ( video ram)

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  • Tuner Cards
  • Panasonic
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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April 21, 2009 10:38:55 PM

I am getting my 4890 tomorrow and am running a dual monitor set-up one to my 22 inch lcd computer monitor and one to my 50 inch panasonic plasma tv.
Is 1gb of memory for the 4890 gonna cut it when I play games on the 50 inch big screen?
Or do I need a video card with 2 gb or possibly a crossfire set-up?

More about : inch panasonic plasma video ram

April 21, 2009 10:47:29 PM

What is is the resolution on the plasma? 1080P?
If so it has the same number of pixels to drive as a 22" 1080P LCD (1920x1080 pixels),
The best way to know for sure if you need a CF setup is to test with one video card.
April 21, 2009 10:52:53 PM

Basically the TV's resolution will probably be 1920x1080, which would be no bigger than a 24" Computer monitor running at 1920x1200. (Unless its an outdated HD with 720p, in which case the res will be even smaller)

By personal experience, I have a 1080p LCD 52" plugged with HDMI to my GTX280 video card which is also 1gb of video memory and its good enough. I'm pretty sure your card will be sufficient as well. I also used to do a dual monitor with a 22" monitor and a 19" square monitor on a Geforce 8800 Ultra and about 700mb of ram, that was also gravy.

Do keep in mind that it will take more out of other applications and games to run dual monitors, and you might want to consider either using the Plasma or the monitor only to improve gaming performances, especially if you want to save money and run on that single video card.

My biggest recommendation is that you find a DVI to HDMI converter and use a high quality Monster Cables HDMI compatible with the Plasma TV in question, and use it as your one and only monitor. I did it with my giant LCD and I have no regrets, besides a smaller work space for Photoshop and Premiere compared to the dual screen. Luckily today's video cards either have a HDMI output built in or they provide the said converter in the box, like I got with my GTX280.
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April 21, 2009 11:16:45 PM

HDTV are limited to 1080P... The 4890 should work fine for Single Display. I'm using a 70 HDTV as display and it works great. I tried it for display below:

3870 512
8800GT 512
GTX 280 OC (This is what i have today) it works great.

For DUAL display refer to Senvae input.

For DUAL display for regular application (2D) it should not be an issue. For gaming you have to choose one as your primary display for games.

April 22, 2009 1:52:15 AM

Thanks for the responses. I will test my video card out when I get it tomorrow and let you guys know how it does on the 50 inch.
It is a 720p monitor the 2009 version Panasonic Viera so it should work just fine.

1080p Will be my next buy later this year and the 720 will migrate to the bedroom.
I'm also in the process of getting a receiver and speakers to hook directly up to my computer and tv. I've been panning through newegg for the last week deciding on tons of stuff. Having alot of fun doing it.
Upgrading from my q6600 to q9650
adding 640 gb hard drive
upgrading to a corsair 750 watt psu
Yamaha receiver
Polk audio speakers

Everbody says I'm spending too much money on this setup but I think it's gonna be a blast especially when it's all done.


April 22, 2009 2:04:31 AM

Do not buy a high quality monster cable! It is a total rip off, and like most digital cables you won't see any difference in quality between it and a similar $5 cable. I used to have my own PC plugged in to my Samsung TV and I noticed absolutely no difference from using a $5 hdmi cable and the overpriced monster one. Unless you want to protect your equipment from some electromagnetic bomb or something I suggest just buying a cable of monoprice.com.
April 22, 2009 12:29:53 PM

trbsht said:
Thanks for the responses. I will test my video card out when I get it tomorrow and let you guys know how it does on the 50 inch.
It is a 720p monitor the 2009 version Panasonic Viera so it should work just fine.

1080p Will be my next buy later this year and the 720 will migrate to the bedroom.
I'm also in the process of getting a receiver and speakers to hook directly up to my computer and tv. I've been panning through newegg for the last week deciding on tons of stuff. Having alot of fun doing it.
Upgrading from my q6600 to q9650
adding 640 gb hard drive
upgrading to a corsair 750 watt psu
Yamaha receiver
Polk audio speakers

Everbody says I'm spending too much money on this setup but I think it's gonna be a blast especially when it's all done.


In a way I own a system very similar to the one you're preparing to buy, and I strongly encourage you to tell everyone who disagrees with your spendings to fornicate themselves with sharp objects because they will be the first ones to invite themselves over to your house for crazy gaming and movies. Do make sure to buy a Blu-Ray drive (at least a reader) so you can drool on the magnificence that your system will become. Also if you're going to plug the PC to the home theatre receiver, do consider spending some money on a soundcard. I bought the Auzentech Prelude soundcard which I plugged to my Yamaha HTR 6160 via SPDIF, the X-FI chip on the soundcard makes all my MP3s sound like CD quality, and the sound is so clear I can turn up the volume loud enough to blow the decorations off my walls. Of course at this point it might be worth it to wait for Auzentech's next X-Fi card made for HDMI sound system and supporting Dolby Tue HD and DTS HD in 7.1 uncompressed channels.

I've been going through the steps for a year or wo now, and I've also done a lot of research. If you have any questions, just message me.
April 22, 2009 2:47:20 PM

Infiniteaqua said:
Do not buy a high quality monster cable! It is a total rip off, and like most digital cables you won't see any difference in quality between it and a similar $5 cable. I used to have my own PC plugged in to my Samsung TV and I noticed absolutely no difference from using a $5 hdmi cable and the overpriced monster one. Unless you want to protect your equipment from some electromagnetic bomb or something I suggest just buying a cable of monoprice.com.



This is very true, some people swear by quality cables and to some extent they are better than a cheaper cable.
What you get with a better quality dearer cable is better physical connection and greater static etc interferance sheilding.
If you dont have that to worry about, and most of it is down to poor cable management a lot of the time then it really dosent matter what the cable costs.
When you get right down to it the cable has two choices 1 work or 2 dont. Its job is to send 1's and 0's along its length between the PC and the Display. It cant half send one it either works or it dosent.

Mactronix
April 22, 2009 10:37:06 PM

Don't bother taking someone's assumptions to heart without doing some research. Here is some reading material on HDMI wires: http://www.bluejeanscable.co.uk/articles/hdmi-cable-inf...

You can also view this PDF file from Digital Wave Wire which strongly suggests you buy quality at least to a certain level. No need to buy the most expensive one, but its probably not a good idea to buy them for 2$ when everyone else is selling them 40-60$ for the same length.

http://digitalwavewire.com/media/pdf/quality.pdf

On a personal note, I remember buying a cheap radioshack Toslink/optical cable for my 5.1 surround sound 8 years ago. When I bought the digital surround sound box for the Xbox (the original one) I could hardly hear any sound from the device, while other friends could. A few years later I bought a THX certified optical cable from Monster (which was 100$ versus the 70$ at Radioshack), and all of a sudden I heard a very noticeable difference in the sound quality from devices like the xbox and the DVD player.

Keep in mind that no one was able to tell you in this forum that higher quality cables don't offer additional shielding, which is a tool used to stop signal interferences from various sources. This can in turn disrupt the quality of the image.

True, you do not need to spend 100$ on a cable like I did, but make your research to ensure you get a cable that will get the job done to the very least. Especially if you will connect audio to it as well.

Getting a 2$ wire for you 3000$ investment would be comparable to firing up the BBQ for a juicy steak, only to douse it in ketchup once its done, instead of a nice recipe sauce like Bullseye or the likes. You might like ketchup, but you'll be missing out. ;) 
April 23, 2009 8:10:42 AM

If that first statement was aimed at me then i think you need to re read your own link.
Taken from the article.
in the vast majority of circumstances, all non-defective HDMI cables will perform equally well (and no, it doesn't matter what spec version it is); the signal is digital and the devices don't know whether they're hooked up with a four-dollar cable or something better or pricier.

Thats pretty much what i said isnt it ?

I also covered this point of yours as well.
Keep in mind that no one was able to tell you in this forum that higher quality cables don't offer additional shielding, which is a tool used to stop signal interferences from various sources. This can in turn disrupt the quality of the image.

So you dont think that better shielding would cost more then ? Im talking generally here and am quite aware that different shielding is better or worse depending on the application its being used for.
However generally speaking for the home user a dearer cable would include better shielding than a cheap one.

I do agree with your last point, buying the very cheapest cable would be a bad move as its more likely to fail or give issues with fit and noise etc.

Mactronix

April 23, 2009 12:20:15 PM

Its simple, Mactronix tells you to save money, I tell you the quality is a good investment even if the difference is barely noticeable.

The last thing you want to do though is buy a HDMI wire for 5$ when everyone else is selling them for at least 50$, maybe its a good deal BUT maybe its a cheap chinese knock-off. The Blue Jeans article I linked does warn you about that.

But the point I was trying to make was: read up on the quality issues, and make your decision based on it.

In any case, that's all fluff, because the issue at hand is solved. The video card in question will be sufficient for you Viera, and even any future 1080p you will purchase.
!