Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Overclocking a Q6600 and stock bottleneck?

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
December 9, 2010 6:31:38 AM

Hey

So I have Win7 64bit, a Q6600 currently at stock 2.4GHz, 4GB 800MHz DDR2 RAM and a Radeon5870 running at stock speeds 850GPU/1200Memory.

I wanted to ask you guys if first the Q6600 at stock speeds is bottlenecking the 5870 and if so then about what speed would I need to overclock it to in order for it to not bottleneck anymore.

Also what would the difference be if lets say I overclock the Q6600 to 2.8GHz in games like Empire:Total War, Fallout 3 and GTA IV.

Oh and one last thing. I tried just now to overclock the Q6600 (though I set it back to stock for the time being). It was clocked to 2.88 (320x9) with stock voltage. I only ran a couple benchmarks like Unigine Heaven and Furmark. My temps were high 2 cores around 60C and 2 around 70C and all idle at 45-50 though this is still acceptable for me. When I ran Prime 95 most of my temps shot up to 90-95 which of course is way too high. I know Prime is supposed to do that and that its not really a good indicator of normal temps so I am wondering what you guys think, if lets say my system remains overclocked and stable is it okay for me to run it with max load temps in the 70-75 range. Its prolly not a good idea for me to run Prime for 24 hours because that will burn out my CPU I'd imagine.

Thank you all in advance for your answers :) 
Req
December 9, 2010 10:33:59 AM

It depends. Some games need more graphics power, others cpu, and some a bit of both. I believe Total War and Fallout 3 are more GPU intensive, but if you're going to play GTA IV you'll want to squeeze whatever you can from your CPU.

Also your cpu's cores having that much of a difference is not good. Judging from the temps it looks like you've got the stock cooler which might be a getting a little wobbly.

Also I'd advise you to never let your CPU go above 60C. 90C in Prime is definitely not good. You should leave it in stock for now and you can overclock when you get a better cooler.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 9, 2010 12:24:25 PM

Are you using stock cpu cooler? If yes then get a new cooler (aftermarket cooler), a stock cooler generally can't stand the heat from overclocking.
Agree, if you ask me, never get your CPU to above 65'C.
About your way of overclocking, are you manually set the Vcore or you let BIOS set to auto? Better manually adjust it, because if you set it to auto then the VCore will increase by itself when you raising the FSB.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 9, 2010 12:36:24 PM

Yes if you can adjust the voltage manually to the lowest stable value for the frequency your going to run. A lot of motherboards raise the voltage linearly as the frequency is increased. At 2.8ghz on that Q you shouldn't see a huge difference in temps if you adjust the voltage manually.

You will benefit from a mild to moderate overclock in games, as they generally love high frequency with two cores or more. In my experience most Core 2's can overclock 10 to 20 percent without having to set a voltage value above your cpu's VID. You can find your chips VID in CoreTemp. At 2.8 you shouldn't have to go over that, and should help keep the temps under control.
m
0
l
December 9, 2010 4:55:29 PM

wa1 said:
Are you using stock cpu cooler? If yes then get a new cooler (aftermarket cooler), a stock cooler generally can't stand the heat from overclocking.
Agree, if you ask me, never get your CPU to above 65'C.
About your way of overclocking, are you manually set the Vcore or you let BIOS set to auto? Better manually adjust it, because if you set it to auto then the VCore will increase by itself when you raising the FSB.



Hello, I am actually using this cooler at the moment

ARCTIC COOLING Freezer 7 Pro Rev.2 92mm Fluid Dynamic CPU Cooler.

When I overclocked it I did not change the Vcore as it seems to be stable. Would increasing the Vcore by .05-.1 help reduce the temperature?
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 9, 2010 4:57:49 PM

Noooo reduce the vcore, more voltage=more heat. Your looking for the lowest possible voltage setting while maintaining stability.
m
0
l
!