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Dell XPS 710 Motherboard and Video Card Compatable?

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September 18, 2009 5:07:30 AM

New to the forums, so please bear with a novice!

I just bought the following GTX 275 card to upgrade my rig. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It should be coming in the mail in a few days, but I'm freaking myself out worrying that it will not be compatible with my rig. Particularly, my motherboard. Here are my specs:

Dell XPS 710
Windows XP 32 BIT
Processor: 2.40 gigahertz Intel Core 2 Duo
Motherboard: Dell Inc. 0UY253 A00 Serial Number: ..CN13740733014D Bus Clock: 1066 megahertz BIOS: Dell Inc. 1.4.0 03/09/2007
2046 Megabytes Usable Installed Memory
Power Supply: 750W with 2 6-Pin Connectors

Will the GTX run on that board?

Also, if I wanted to upgrade my CPU....any advise on what I could get?
a c 136 V Motherboard
September 18, 2009 5:20:13 AM

If your motherboard has a PCI-E 16x slot your VGA will work fine.
About CPU,if 1066 is the max FSB that your motherboard supports then Q6600 is a good option
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a b V Motherboard
September 18, 2009 6:25:48 AM

Unless yours is far different than mine . . . well, anyhow, the 275 will run for sure.

Download CPU-Z (32-bit) from here:

http://forums.tweaktown.com/f69/latest-overclocking-pro...

On its Motherboard tab, what Chipset and Southbridge are shown?

Mine are nForce SLI Intel Edition, nForce 570 SLI, and the board is actually an EVGA board (though the Manufacturer is shown as blank).

As for what cpu, the problem is this: AFAIK, Dell's last update of the BIOS was a lonnng time ago. And processors made after that date may not be recognized properly. For reference, my CPU is a QX6700 2.66GHz quad.
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September 18, 2009 4:53:18 PM

Cool, Thanks so much for the fast response. Dont know the Chipset/Southbridge (or even what that really means), so I'll post tonight after I download CPU-Z.

i'm trying to stretch out the life of this rig for decent gaming. The XPS 710 has been decent considering my lack of tech knowledge. So frustrating you know people are building their own rigs at less than half the price. I figure I can gut pieces out one by one and keep this beast going for a bit. My Processor is 3yr old tech...but its been a rock solid CPU. The only thing that wont come out of this box is the PSU, which sucks.

Stupid question, but after I supply the Chipset/Southbridge info from CPU-Z, and it turns out I cannot upgrade my CPU without a Mobo upgrade, a new Mobo upgrades the BIOS correct?

And if you do upgrade a mobo, do you have to check compatibility with any other component? I dont want to up a Mobo to get a higher end Processor only to find out that some other component - OS, PSU...even a friggin sound card, gums up my plans.
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September 18, 2009 11:15:41 PM

Chipset - NVIDIA nForce4 SLI Intel Edition
Southbridge - NVIDIA nForce 570 SLI
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a b V Motherboard
September 19, 2009 2:41:01 AM

Your mobo will support any single video card as well as SLI/crossfire if it has two PCIe slots. Your 750W psu will power almost all 2xvidcard setups, though you will have to check your power cables. Adapters are available to convert, eg, 4pin molex to 6pin PCIe.

I can't help you on what cpus your mobo will support. Perhaps Dell will answer the questions "What is the latest BIOS version available, and what CPUs does it support?" Dell BIOS will support the QX6700, but I don't think it's a wise (ebay) buy for anyone (slow (2.66GHz), but an unlocked multiplier).

Absent an answer from Dell or from the Dell User forum, your best bet to upgrade is an original Core 2 Duo quad with as high a clock rate as you can find. You will need that, because BIOS is locked to Dell's concepts of OCing - you will likely not be able to OC it yourself.

My mobo is not a standard ATX motherboard, and it is noticable from outside the case. Look at the rear of the case while the case is on its side, motherboard on the floor. The (daughterboard) slots are to the *left* of the mobo's back panel, an ATX or mATX board is opposite.

And so my case is also not ATX standard.

So, if you want a new mobo and yours is like mine, you will be buying a new case, mobo, cpu, and OS (because all you have is a Dell recovery disk). You can *most likely* use the PSU (it is probably ATX standard), vid card, any sound card (although it will likely not connect to your new case's front panel; however, your new mobo will include adequate sound), perhaps your modem (if equipped and if you can find drivers for it), HDs (for a fresh OS install), and optical drive(s).

Dell does not want you to upgrade, they want you to buy new.

The good news - lol - is that when it is time to upgrade, you can take your new vid card (and other parts) and put it in a brand new i5 system for $700 or less (depending on psu, etc). And never go through this again.
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November 6, 2009 8:04:28 AM

Twoboxer said:
Your mobo will support any single video card as well as SLI/crossfire if it has two PCIe slots. Your 750W psu will power almost all 2xvidcard setups, though you will have to check your power cables. Adapters are available to convert, eg, 4pin molex to 6pin PCIe.

I can't help you on what cpus your mobo will support. Perhaps Dell will answer the questions "What is the latest BIOS version available, and what CPUs does it support?" Dell BIOS will support the QX6700, but I don't think it's a wise (ebay) buy for anyone (slow (2.66GHz), but an unlocked multiplier).

Absent an answer from Dell or from the Dell User forum, your best bet to upgrade is an original Core 2 Duo quad with as high a clock rate as you can find. You will need that, because BIOS is locked to Dell's concepts of OCing - you will likely not be able to OC it yourself.

My mobo is not a standard ATX motherboard, and it is noticable from outside the case. Look at the rear of the case while the case is on its side, motherboard on the floor. The (daughterboard) slots are to the *left* of the mobo's back panel, an ATX or mATX board is opposite.

And so my case is also not ATX standard.

So, if you want a new mobo and yours is like mine, you will be buying a new case, mobo, cpu, and OS (because all you have is a Dell recovery disk). You can *most likely* use the PSU (it is probably ATX standard), vid card, any sound card (although it will likely not connect to your new case's front panel; however, your new mobo will include adequate sound), perhaps your modem (if equipped and if you can find drivers for it), HDs (for a fresh OS install), and optical drive(s).

Dell does not want you to upgrade, they want you to buy new.

The good news - lol - is that when it is time to upgrade, you can take your new vid card (and other parts) and put it in a brand new i5 system for $700 or less (depending on psu, etc). And never go through this again.


Hi chaps, first posting in a forum so please forgive if there are any anomalies in what I am saying. I have an interest in gaming technology and all I have learnt I have learnt from good research.

The answer to the CPU is that you can run any LGA775 CPU as long as it has a max FSB of 1066MHz; hence why I am rocking with a QX6800.

The format for the motherboard is a BTX unlike the other common factor ATX and was made with belief that gamers would get better benchmarks all round with a new layout that see the RAM and PCI-e slots are better aligned with the processor. As with all new concepts I think this was ditched in favour of much improved ATX technology which in turn has helped keep the cost of our kit low. You can still get some BTX motherboards although you can spend less on a much better and more common form factor.

In response to everettcronin's question, yes you will be able to run the card although if you wanted to add a second I would recommend getting the 1000w PSU which is Dell ready with 4 power connectors for PCI-e cards. http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=12...

Now for my question! Is there absolutely no way of overclocking these machines? I alter the CPU clock in BIOS to 3.49GHz and after rebooting find there is no over clock to be seen. It is still selected in BIOS just hasn't extended into the rest of the machine.
2nd question, I have been having problems using EPP/SLI where after selecting the machine will boot to black screen before desktop and stay loading for around 5-10 minutes before appearing and not giving me the new better frequencies. This is the RAM, http://oc.adata.com.tw/1_product_detail.asp?pid=AD21066....

Thanks chaps!
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a b V Motherboard
November 6, 2009 6:52:11 PM

The BIOS in Dell's machines is scripted by Dell. As far as I know, these do not permit overclocking - or access to selected other features - except (eg) if the PC was purchased as factory overclocked from Dell.

Even on such a PC, the overclocking settings are different than standard BIOS. When a lock up on my machine clears/resets BIOS, it reverts to stock timing. To regain the factory overclock, I simply change a BIOS setting to "3.2GHz". There is no access to voltages, timings, etc.

Historically, overclocking programs run from Windows will fail or just lock up the PC. Even temperature monitoring programs such as CPU-Z have locked up my PC (and forced a BIOS reset) until a special .ini was created.

Dell doesn't want you in BIOS in their machines.
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November 7, 2009 4:10:37 AM

Thanks Twoboxer; I guess my machine would have to been originally overclocked to enable it to work and it would have to be with the original CPU it was overclocked with?
In that case I am at a dead end. My XPS 710 is finished!


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a b V Motherboard
November 8, 2009 4:05:06 AM

If your XPS 710 wasn't factory OC'd . . . if you do not have access to the BIOS . . . yup, you're stuck at stock speeds.

The mobo *may* work with other LGA775 socket cpus. But personally I would not bother to go down that path. If you had a standard mobo/BIOS, the manufacturer would provide BIOS revisions to support other cpus consistent with th the mobo's limits on front side bus, etc.

Only Dell knows whether their latest BIOS will support any other cpu. You could *try* calling them, but . . . they don't want you screwing with their system so they can support it easily, and so you buy a new one when its time to upgrade.

My factory OC'd XPS 710 H2C is the last name brand PC I will ever buy. I build my own now, and I would recommend you do the same or buy from an assembler that uses specific, name brand, standard parts.
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