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Gigabyte GA-P55-UD4P Problem

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September 18, 2009 6:18:52 AM

Decided it was time for an upgrade so I bought an i7 860, some RAM and a Gigabyte GA-P55-UD4P. I have had the machine setup for a few days and all has been well. Got everything installed happily.

Today, I come back after lunch and the machine is running and there is no video. I reboot, nothing.

I removed every plug and connector except power and video. Nothing. No video, no beeps, nothing.

I tried switching and reseating RAM, nothing.

Can anyone give me some insight into what might be wrong or what I can try next?

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a b V Motherboard
September 18, 2009 12:45:15 PM

Try building outside the case with cpu, beeper and power. Listen for beeps.
Keep adding components and listening for beeps. When you get no beeps there is the problem.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
September 18, 2009 1:22:27 PM

Are you getting 'phase LEDs' on the MOBO when you try to power up? Do you have a case speaker installed? (I've run into lots of people who expect the 'bootup beeps' to come through their Log1 5.1 speakers on the audio plugs - don' work that way!) Does the CPU fan spin at all?
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September 18, 2009 6:35:44 PM

bilbat said:
Are you getting 'phase LEDs' on the MOBO when you try to power up? Do you have a case speaker installed? (I've run into lots of people who expect the 'bootup beeps' to come through their Log1 5.1 speakers on the audio plugs - don' work that way!) Does the CPU fan spin at all?

No LED's are lighting up. The manual says that they have to be turned on in the BIOS. I do have a case speaker hooked up. I pulled it out of another case. The CPU fan spins briefly then stops, the rest of the case fans stay on.

evongugg said:
Try building outside the case with cpu, beeper and power. Listen for beeps.
Keep adding components and listening for beeps. When you get no beeps there is the problem.

OK, I will try this next.

Maybe I will pull the HSF off too and see if there is anything interesting going under there.

I also think it is strange that it ran for two days without issue.
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September 18, 2009 10:21:02 PM

OK, so I pulled the MB out and hooked it up with a different power supply and it worked.

Then I pulled the case over and hooked it up that way and it worked.

Then I put the board back in the case and it worked.

Then I hooked the components up one at a time and it worked every time.

Right now it is setup and working but I am still concerned because I haven't really changed anything and it is working.

Is there anything I should be checking?
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September 19, 2009 2:46:36 AM

I have a GA-EP45, and i had a similar problem...my conclusion: something was making a short-circuit, because, with all components outside the case it worked. I believe that the boards with 2 oz cooper are more likelly to have this kind of problem, because the extra cooper conducts more eletricity...

What i have done to solve the problem: i have used a non-conductive material to isolate the case from the motherboard( i put only on the mounting holes)...

Sorry my bad english...

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a c 177 V Motherboard
September 19, 2009 11:53:07 PM

Quote:
I believe that the boards with 2 oz copper are more likely to have this kind of problem, because the extra copper conducts more electricity...


:lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 
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July 10, 2010 2:41:55 AM

I am very late with a response, however, this may help someone else.

bilbat may have been a little abrasive laugh gifs, however, he is correct in that is not extra copper. The problem is a ground however, and ricbst was wise in trying to eliminate that threat.

Some motherboards induced a ground at various locations, one of which was along the back of the case. Although recently manufactured motherboards should not have a closed circuit problem, recently there was a danger.

Years ago ground protectors [for screws] used to be supplied with the motherboard, however, that is no longer done. I go to the extreme of making extra non-conductive standoffs to support motherboards.
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