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Suggestions amd athlon 2 3x

Last response: in Overclocking
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December 13, 2010 11:35:00 PM

i'm using a amd Athlon II tri-core on a biostar TA880GB+

currently running standard settings 3X 3.2Ghz

occt http://i52.tinypic.com/14uyfxy.png
top temp at 100% is 122F

i was wondering if i have room to up it and what would happen
my motherboard allows unlock 4th core , and/or overclock by 2%-4%-6%-8%-10%-12%

what would be the best decision if any ?

More about : suggestions amd athlon

a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 14, 2010 7:29:14 AM

If you're happy to do some testing, unlocking the 4th core would give you a bigger increase on multitasking than overclocking. Remember though, only 50-odd percent of tri-cores are quads that have been disabled, the rest are quads that have something wrong with them which is why they were disabled.

If you unlock the forth core, you may need to increase voltage a little to keep it stable, and then do a crap load of benchmarks and stress tests to see if it's stable.

If you're not after multitasking but would like a boost in gaming, I would suggest overclocking (either with or without the 4th core) but I don't like the options of percentage and would prefer options to change FSB and multiplier. An 8% overclock would get you to around 3.45GHz I believe. Maybe try that first, as you might not need to touch the voltage.
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December 14, 2010 9:16:01 PM

acer0169 said:
If you're happy to do some testing, unlocking the 4th core would give you a bigger increase on multitasking than overclocking. Remember though, only 50-odd percent of tri-cores are quads that have been disabled, the rest are quads that have something wrong with them which is why they were disabled.

If you unlock the forth core, you may need to increase voltage a little to keep it stable, and then do a crap load of benchmarks and stress tests to see if it's stable.

If you're not after multitasking but would like a boost in gaming, I would suggest overclocking (either with or without the 4th core) but I don't like the options of percentage and would prefer options to change FSB and multiplier. An 8% overclock would get you to around 3.45GHz I believe. Maybe try that first, as you might not need to touch the voltage.


i dont like the idea of doin alot of test with a good chance of 4th not working ,, i gues 3x sounds better but you said the % thing doesent sound good that FSB or multiplier would be better ,, how could i change my FSB or multiplier then ? and how do i cheak about voltage , you said it might need changing
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 15, 2010 9:34:53 AM

A lot of people have good success rate with the 4th core unlocked, but the original X3s were ALL broken X4s. Over a few weeks (and with them selling as fast as the latest x-factor album) AMD started disabling perfectly fine quad cores to fill the market with X3s. Now (thinking about it) there are probably a lot more disabled X4s then there are dodgy X3s so worth a try.

If you did want to try it - I would unlock the core with the options in your bios, increase your vcore just a tad (a single increment, normally around 0.05v) and then run a 3+ hour test on Prime95. There is an option in Prime95 called "round off checking" that needs to be ticked, and then just start a torture test.

FSB (front side bus) and Multiplier settings are normally quite easy to find. Sometimes under an "advanced settings" heading, and sometimes you'll see an option like "CPU clock: Auto" and if you change that to manual, it'll show the FSB, Multiplier, vcore etc etc. If you're having issues finding these settings then let me know and I'll do a little research.

Your FSB overclocks several things on your motherboard, so if you can I would suggest chaning your mutiplier first. If you're already at your max mutiplier (probably 16) then the only way to overclock is via the FSB. Now if you're FSB is set to 200MHz, and your CPU Multiplier is at 16, that's 16x200= 3200 (3.2GHz). If you overclock your FSB to 210 say, then that's 16x210= 3360 (3.36GHz) and so on.

Small overclocks (such as the one above) will probably be stable with the stock voltage, meaning you wont need to increase your vcore. But all chips are different.. and some can't overclock at all with increasing voltage.

To overclock properly you need to invest a little time doing it, by increasing your FSB (or multiplier) by small amounts, then running a stress test such as Prime95 and seeing if it's stable. If you are stable you can stop there, or push your FSB or Multiplier up some more. Eventually you'll get errors in your stress test program or will get BSOD. At this point you can either add more volts (increase vcore) or dial back to the last speed you were stable at.

That's pretty much it.
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December 15, 2010 11:02:14 PM

acer0169 said:
A lot of people have good success rate with the 4th core unlocked, but the original X3s were ALL broken X4s. Over a few weeks (and with them selling as fast as the latest x-factor album) AMD started disabling perfectly fine quad cores to fill the market with X3s. Now (thinking about it) there are probably a lot more disabled X4s then there are dodgy X3s so worth a try.

If you did want to try it - I would unlock the core with the options in your bios, increase your vcore just a tad (a single increment, normally around 0.05v) and then run a 3+ hour test on Prime95. There is an option in Prime95 called "round off checking" that needs to be ticked, and then just start a torture test.

FSB (front side bus) and Multiplier settings are normally quite easy to find. Sometimes under an "advanced settings" heading, and sometimes you'll see an option like "CPU clock: Auto" and if you change that to manual, it'll show the FSB, Multiplier, vcore etc etc. If you're having issues finding these settings then let me know and I'll do a little research.

Your FSB overclocks several things on your motherboard, so if you can I would suggest chaning your mutiplier first. If you're already at your max mutiplier (probably 16) then the only way to overclock is via the FSB. Now if you're FSB is set to 200MHz, and your CPU Multiplier is at 16, that's 16x200= 3200 (3.2GHz). If you overclock your FSB to 210 say, then that's 16x210= 3360 (3.36GHz) and so on.

Small overclocks (such as the one above) will probably be stable with the stock voltage, meaning you wont need to increase your vcore. But all chips are different.. and some can't overclock at all with increasing voltage.

To overclock properly you need to invest a little time doing it, by increasing your FSB (or multiplier) by small amounts, then running a stress test such as Prime95 and seeing if it's stable. If you are stable you can stop there, or push your FSB or Multiplier up some more. Eventually you'll get errors in your stress test program or will get BSOD. At this point you can either add more volts (increase vcore) or dial back to the last speed you were stable at.

That's pretty much it.



i chose to try and use the biostar's T-series auto overclock and use the v6 engine , it from what i see practly just uped the bus to 220 , what increased cpu to 3.52ghz , tho when stressing it i got a crash after 1-3 minutes ,so i set it manually and i was thinking about the increase to volt up by 0.05 but the volt is already at 1.44 and my friend said 1.49 seems to high , what do you think i should do ?
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 16, 2010 3:38:23 PM

Hmm, well as it's a Athlon and not a Phenom 1.49 is a little high. Instead of using the auto overclock settings, try manually setting the FSB to 210 which will give you a speed of 3.36GHz. See if that can run at 1.44v.
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