OCZ RevoDrive or Crucial RealSSD?

Hey, I have a bit of a doubt regarding these two SSDs.
I was pretty sure of buying a Crucial RealSSD 128gb as boot drive but then I bumped in this:

http://www.vibuonline.de/product_info.php?products_id=680174&pid=geizhals

OCZ RevoDrive 120GB, PCIe x4, read at 540mbps, write at 450mbps. I must admit it, that's bad ass. And it doesn't cost MUCH more than the Crucial (250€ instead of 225€). There's also the 80gb version, which is 195€, could be a better alternative since 128gb for a boot drive could be pretty much overkill. It's also stated that they are boot capable. What do you think, should I get a 128gb Real SSD or a 80/120gb RevoDrive?


I will use this motherboard:

http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?Model=X58%20Extreme6&cat=Specifications

Which has these slots:

Quote:
- 3 x PCI Express 2.0 x16 slots (PCIE1: x16 mode; PCIE4/PCIE5: single at x16 or dual at x8/x8 mode) (Double-wide slot spacing between each PCI-E slot)
- 2 x PCI Express x1 slots
- 2 x PCI slots


Since I'm planning to do a GTX460 SLI, at first I was worried about not doing a x16/x16 config, but then I found out that no graphics card at the moment can saturate a PCIe 2.0 x8 - let alone a x16. Can someone confirm this?
16 answers Last reply
More about revodrive crucial realssd
  1. 120GB Revo................... Anyday..
    And even having the Revo in the PCIe will not effect your x16 SLi config....
    Actually the cards can saturate the X16 config, it's the processors that give way.....
    Plus a little of the HDD times effects the whole thing.
    But your Revo is going to max out nearly every bit of the machine... :)
  2. alyoshka said:
    120GB Revo................... Anyday..
    And even having the Revo in the PCIe will not effect your x16 SLi config....
    Actually the cards can saturate the X16 config, it's the processors that give way.....
    Plus a little of the HDD times effects the whole thing.
    But your Revo is going to max out nearly every bit of the machine... :)


    There is stated that the first can do x16 alone, and the second/third PCIe 2.0 can do either x16 or x8/x8, but that means that I can still make a x16/x16/x4 config?
    Anyway, I'll have 2 MSI Cyclone 460's. Are these SSDs very sensible to heat, since they don't have an enclosure?
  3. Don't use the RevoDrive under Windows; so use a normal SSD if you run Windows. You don't want to lose TRIM support, which is unavoidable on Windows platforms.
  4. Why should it lose TRIM support? I thought that problem was only for "external" raid controllers, and the RevoDrives ones are integrated with the SSD.
  5. SHNS0 said:
    Why should it lose TRIM support? I thought that problem was only for "external" raid controllers, and the RevoDrives ones are integrated with the SSD.


    it uses the Marvel contoler and Marvel does not support TRIM.
  6. ^+1. Exactly. However, IIRC the *new* Revo X2 uses a Sand Force controller which supports TRIM.

    Also, IF you plan to boot off of your PCIe SSD be aware that there may be compatibility issues,etc depending on your board.

    Unless you know what issues you may run in to and can deal with them, I say go for the C300 Or a Vertex 2 as the problems are not worth the time (due to RMA).

    But seriously, *WHY* do you need all this extra speed? Unless you are running a DB,etc the speed differences/IOPS are quite negligible in real world performance.
  7. Take a look of this before buy: http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1453/1/

    I own the C300 64GB and hit the 375MB/s so i will go for the C300, Vertex 2 or G.Skill the RevoDrive is only and option when SATA II or SATA III bottleneck the system something that is almost impossible for now :lol:
  8. I still go for RevoDrive - It's not really noticeable for a RevoDrive without the TRIM.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/3788/oczs-revodrive-pcie-ssd-preview-an-affordable-pcie-ssd/1
  9. Shadow703793 said:
    ^+1. Exactly. However, IIRC the *new* Revo X2 uses a Sand Force controller which supports TRIM.

    Also, IF you plan to boot off of your PCIe SSD be aware that there may be compatibility issues,etc depending on your board.

    Unless you know what issues you may run in to and can deal with them, I say go for the C300 Or a Vertex 2 as the problems are not worth the time (due to RMA).

    But seriously, *WHY* do you need all this extra speed? Unless you are running a DB,etc the speed differences/IOPS are quite negligible in real world performance.


    You can only buy it from OCZ at this point.
    Only comes in 100GB to 960GB.
    I dont know what the price is?

    It has 4 not 2 Sand Force Controllers!
    speed up to 740MB/s and up to 120,000 IOPS
  10. As far as i know, RevoDrive does not use a Marvell controller but is a Silicon Image SiI-3124 PCI-X 4-port SATA controller connected to a bridge chip, connected to PCI-express 1.0 x4.

    Silicon Image offers 4 SATA/300 ports, on each port is a Sandforce controller. The Revodrive X2 has 2 sandforce controllers and the X4 has 4.

    But neither solution should have TRIM capability on Windows. TRIM does not only depend on hardware (of course sandforce supports TRIM; all SATA controllers support TRIM also), but it depends on SOFTWARE instead, or rather the I/O storage driver. And when you use Silicon Image under Windows, you will not be using a TRIM-enabled Microsoft IDE/AHCI driver, but Silicon Image's driver which does not support TRIM.

    So this isn't a hardware issue, but rather a software issue. Under FreeBSD and Linux you can get TRIM on the Revodrive, but not under other OS.

    750MB/s write scores are nice, but only achievable if you write zeroes or other data that is easily compressible. Consider the real speed 100MB/s per sandforce controller, so 200-400MB/s real write speed. You can test this: ATTO benchmark writes zeroes so you get max writes, CrystalDiskMark tests with incompressible data so you get the real/raw write speed instead.

    On Windows this product works kind of bad due to the Silicon Image drivers ruining your performance. But it should make a great ZFS SSD; but no safe writes so not suitable as SLOG device.

    Perhaps OCZ should wait until Silicon Image releases a native PCI-express 2.0 controller, so the bridge chip won't be necessary. But due to it's design, you would have to use the FakeRAID drivers from Silicon Image under Windows, to make it a single SSD. On other OS like FreeBSD, you would see 4 SSDs instead; one for each sandforce controller. Because that is what it is: a 4-port SATA FakeRAID controller with on each port a small Sandforce SSD.
  11. Much of the increased performance comes courtesy of the four SandForce-1200 SSD controllers included in the design, which are internally connected in RAID 0 to increase capacity and throughput. While the original RevoDrive offered the same technology, it only had a pair of SandForce controllers.

    The RevoDrive X2 will be manufactured in the company's shiny new Taiwan SSD plant, enabling the company to churn out up to 140,000 of the new devices each month in capacities ranging from the 100GB base model to the 960GB top-end version.

    The design of the RevoDrive X2 is similar to that of the Wings PCIe SSD from the UK-based Angelbird, which manages to beat OCZ's latest creation in the speed stakes with claims of 1.02GB/s read speeds on the four-module model.

    UK pricing and availability for the RevoDrive X2 has not yet been confirmed.

    http://www.bit-tech.net/news/hardware/2010/10/29/ocz-revodrive-x2-uses-4-ssds-in-raid/1
  12. Well, I'm running no database, but I thought that having a much faster SSD would make everything even MORE faster than with a normal SSD. But if I don't get TRIM, use a spare PCIe slot and even may have a few compatibility problems... Well, I don't think this is really worth it.
    Ok so, in few words, the RevoDrive is pretty much not the right thing for me. That means, a 128gb C300 should be the best thing, right?

    Oh, and a little P.S. question: Will I see the difference between a SATA3 SSD-to-SATA3 HDD configuration and a SATA2 SSD-to-SATA2 HDD one? I remember reading somewhere that mechanical hard disks aren't powerful enough to saturate a SATA2 connection, but afaik things could change when a SSD comes in the way..
  13. SSD are much faster that HDD on SATA II or SATA III but even that both HDD or SSD can't saturate the connection.
  14. (1) Concur with sub mesa and shadow. The extra performance increase in sequential read/writes will not normally translate to a big boost in day-to-day experience. The high seq throughput benifits working with LARGE data files such as Video files (from 1 gig, and upto 30 Gigs for Blu-ray video), large databases, and large jepg/bit map Pictures which would normally be on a HDD anyway.

    (2) Your last question, If you are talking about Sata 6 HDDs (Have WD on a sata 6 controller), Not worth the extra cash as only the burst speed is improved. As for hybrid drives (HDDs with a small SSD), A lot depends on the algorthim. I think I would stay with the discrete SSD paired with a HDD as being more cost effective.
  15. I'm talking about a SATA3 caviar black/velociraptor paired with a SATA3 SSD. Since I will store games, movies and everything on (a) separate drive(s), I'm interested to know if there will be benefits over a normal SATA2 hard disk paired with a SATA2/3 SSD, like "you'll move a 30gb bluray rip a little/quite/a lot faster".
  16. A lot faster :) But then again, if you're copying from the Normal SATAII HDD to a SATA III HDD the bottleneck is going to be the speed factor of the read on the first drive since it's slower,.

    So basically what everybody is suggesting is you have your Main OS and Programs on SSDs an have the rest on Normal HDDs, but, if you have Pics and Movies that are really big in size then they ought to be on a SSD too.....
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