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Dual Socket LGA1366 Motherboard?

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September 20, 2009 3:18:53 AM

Hello all :) 

Ok, I was just wondering, is there any disadvantages to having a dual cpu computer? I know that they are mainly for servers and all, and I know it wouldn't make a big difference for gaming, but wouldn't one have a big advantage over a single CPU for things like rendering and stuff?

I don't hear about many people using dual socket mobos so was just wondering :) 

Thanks!
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September 20, 2009 3:22:22 AM

Disadvantages: you need to use the more expensive Xeon CPUs rather than the i7, and you can't overclock

Advantages: Huge performance gain in multi-threaded and memory dependent apps.
September 20, 2009 3:30:56 AM

Oh ok, that sorta stinks, was thinking it would be cool to run dual i7 920s ;) 

But yea, how do Xeon processors compare to the i7s for different uses? (ex. Rendering, Gaming, etc.)
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September 20, 2009 5:31:36 AM

They should perform the same. The Xeons cost more than double, and should be much more reliable.

As of late, even an i7 doesn't hamper a CrossFire or Tri-Fire setup so a Xeon setup wouldn't give you much more.

Dual socket would be much more cost-effective for workstations wherein rendering or some computationally intensive "stuff" needs to get done. (Gaming isn't one of them)
September 20, 2009 9:05:16 PM

Ok, thx :) 

Seeing as how I use my computers for gaming as well as 3D rendering I think that, unless the prices come way down for the xeon processors that have clock speeds of around 2.66ghz, I'll just stick with a single core setup with an i7 920 :) 

Now I am just curious, why exactly do the dual socket 1366 mobos not support the 1366 i7s?
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September 20, 2009 9:41:46 PM

Quote:


Now I am just curious, why exactly do the dual socket 1366 mobos not support the 1366 i7s?

It's got to do with more or less with demand. After all Xeons have quite a bit of a profit margin. Intel/AMD doesn't want people to use the cheaper desktop ones. HOWEVER, there are a few cases where you can use a Xeon/Opterons on normal PCs but not the other way around.

Quote:
single core setup with an i7 920

Single socket. Not single core :lol:  The i7 has 4 cores with 8 threads.
September 21, 2009 12:56:19 AM

Shadow703793 said:
Quote:


Now I am just curious, why exactly do the dual socket 1366 mobos not support the 1366 i7s?

It's got to do with more or less with demand. After all Xeons have quite a bit of a profit margin. Intel/AMD doesn't want people to use the cheaper desktop ones. HOWEVER, there are a few cases where you can use a Xeon/Opterons on normal PCs but not the other way around.


Not really sure that answers my question completely.... what I was meaning was, what does the Xeon processor have that the i7 doesn't? :) 

Shadow703793 said:
Quote:
single core setup with an i7 920

Single socket. Not single core :lol:  The i7 has 4 cores with 8 threads.


Oops, you type funny things when you are in a hurry, lol [:lectrocrew:7]

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September 21, 2009 1:48:25 AM
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ElectroGoofy said:

Now I am just curious, why exactly do the dual socket 1366 mobos not support the 1366 i7s?

The i7s only have a single QPI link. You need 2 for a dual socket setup - one link from each processor goes to the main northbridge, and one link connects the two CPUs with each other. The Xeon 5500 series (the one you would need) has a pair of QPI links, rather than a single one.
September 21, 2009 4:35:43 PM

1. There aren't any Dual Socket Motherboards that will support overclocking that's worth the investment.
2. If you want to use a XEON CPU, the Intel Xeon W3550 is $600. You can overclock this to over 5.0GHz with water cooling. Thus, against the i7 975 that's $1000, you save $400.
3. One of the main reasons to have a Dual Socket Motherboard is for Database servers or anything that doesn't have hyperthreading optimization (i.e. SQL Server). A Quad Core hyperthreading with 8 threads is not as efficient as two Quad Cores without hyperthreading and 8 threads. However, once optimized, an Intel Dual Socket Quad Core system can opt to have 16 threads.
4. While the Intel Xeon W3550 can get to 5.0GHz when overclocked, it will need to have hypthreading disabled. Though at around 4.5GHz, with hyperthreading, I'm not sure which generally performs better... that, or 2 Quad Core X5520's at 2.26GHz with hyperthreading.
September 22, 2009 11:19:20 AM

Ok, that answers my question, thanks! :D 
May 17, 2010 10:54:47 AM

Dual 1366 sockets does not mean it supports dual Core-i7's... You will need to have Intel Xenon X5000 series processors for those sockets in order for them to work properly.
!