Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Just bought my first gaming rig, can I upgrad to RAID 0?

Last response: in Storage
Share
November 3, 2010 9:41:53 AM

I just had my first gaming PC built for me, theHDD is 1TB SATA-III 6.0Gb/s 64MB Cache 7200RPM. My question is this: If in the future I decide I want more performance can I buy another drive and upgrade to RAID 0 without alot of speacial equipment?
a b 4 Gaming
a c 356 G Storage
November 3, 2010 10:47:19 AM

If your motherboards supports RAID, then yes you can, although you will need to do a clean install of the OS if you plan on making the RAID the boot device.

There is no special equipment you will need.
November 3, 2010 11:32:02 AM

Hawkeye22 said:
If your motherboards supports RAID, then yes you can, although you will need to do a clean install of the OS if you plan on making the RAID the boot device.

There is no special equipment you will need.


I apologize for my ignorance... I have only been using computers for 2 years (My hillbilly high school had no such classes to teach us the ins and outs of them to prepare us for college and the modern day workforce demands that require those of us to use them to use them.) so I have only just begun learning about The more technical aspects of computer hardware and setup configurations.

My question is, and again forgive me for my ignorance, is what to you mean by a clean intall of the OS? Would this wipeout my Windows 7 and require me to order a new set of software or would the computer some with a system repair disk?

Allso would I lose all my previouse HDD saves by adding another system to raid? Honestly I can deal with that

Related resources
a b 4 Gaming
a c 356 G Storage
November 3, 2010 12:09:13 PM

Your computer should have come with a copy of Windows7 or at the very least a recovery CD. If you plan on running Windows off the RAID array, then you will need to do clean install, i.e. erase your current version of Windows7 and install from scractch. Any windows updates you have installed will need to be reinstalled along with all your programs.

It sounds like you currently only have one hard drive and your intention was to make this part of the RAID. If this is the case, then a clean install is the only way to do this.

As stated before, your motherboard has to support RAID to do this otherwise you will need to purchase a separate RAID controller. The person that built this computer for you should have this information.
November 3, 2010 4:38:57 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
Your computer should have come with a copy of Windows7 or at the very least a recovery CD. If you plan on running Windows off the RAID array, then you will need to do clean install, i.e. erase your current version of Windows7 and install from scractch. Any windows updates you have installed will need to be reinstalled along with all your programs.

It sounds like you currently only have one hard drive and your intention was to make this part of the RAID. If this is the case, then a clean install is the only way to do this.

As stated before, your motherboard has to support RAID to do this otherwise you will need to purchase a separate RAID controller. The person that built this computer for you should have this information.


My motherboard does indeed support RAID. I only have a few questions left

First: When Raid is implemented, do both hard drives come up under the C\ directory or will there be two separate C\ and D\ directories for example?

Secondly, yes it is Windows 7 premium, I haven't received the PC yet but my Laptop is also windows 7 and did not come with a recovery cd. Does Windows 7 automatically restore itself?
a b 4 Gaming
a c 356 G Storage
November 3, 2010 5:17:43 PM

The RAID controller will present the array as a single volume to the OS, so as long as you only create one partition on the array then it will show up as C:\

No, windows does not automatically restore itself. Your laptop most likely has a recovery partition that you can access at boot time. This won't help you with your new computer.

Also, you have to ask yourself if RAID 0 is even worth it. The performance gains probably won't be much and RAID 0 isn't even a true RAID. RAID is meant for redundancy so that if one drive fails the computer can continue to run normally. In RAID 0, if one drive fails, all data on the array is lost.
November 3, 2010 5:52:56 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
The RAID controller will present the array as a single volume to the OS, so as long as you only create one partition on the array then it will show up as C:\

No, windows does not automatically restore itself. Your laptop most likely has a recovery partition that you can access at boot time. This won't help you with your new computer.

Also, you have to ask yourself if RAID 0 is even worth it. The performance gains probably won't be much and RAID 0 isn't even a true RAID. RAID is meant for redundancy so that if one drive fails the computer can continue to run normally. In RAID 0, if one drive fails, all data on the array is lost.


That is great information. I was reading up on the failure rate on RAID 0 and that is what made me hesistant from ordering my setup that way. I did not know, however, that if one drive fails on RAID 0 then all data will be lost. That is wonderful information. Thank you

I will be using this computer for 85%gaming, 10% downloading mods, and 5% visiting FAQS (for when I get stuck, i suck at games!). Is there a RAID setup that would be advisable to use without sacrificing data security and dramatically decreasing load times and such in games or should i stick to my 1TB SATA-III 6.0Gb/s 64MB Cache 7200RPM HDD?

These are the rest of my specs:

CARE1: Ultra Enhanced Packaging Solution - Protect Your Dream System During Transit [+19]

CARE2: CoolerMaster Thermal Fusion 400 Extreme Performance CPU - Thermal Compound Optimized for Thermal Dissipation [+10]

CAS: * Azza Solano 1000 Full-Tower Advance Cooling Case w/ Dual 230mm Fan + Extra 3 Fans [+53]

CASUPGRADE: 12in Cold Cathode Neon Light [+10] (Blue Color)

CD: Sony 24X Double Layer Dual Format DVD+-R/+-RW + CD-R/RW Drive [+3] (BLACK COLOR)

CPU: [Special] Intel® Core™ i7-950 3.06 GHz 8M Intel Smart Cache LGA1366

CS_FAN: Maximum 120MM Color Case Cooling Fans for your selected case [+15] (Blue Color)

FA_HDD: Vigor iSURF II Hard Disk Drive Cooling System [+21] (1 x System)

FAN: CyberPower Xtreme Hydro Liquid Cooling Kit 240MM w/ Dual Fan(CPU & GPU Liquid Cool Capable,

Extreme Overclcking Performance + Extreme Slient at 18dBA) [+63]

FREEBIE_CU1: Star Trek Online Digital Deluxe Game

FREEBIE_VC1: FREE Blacklight: Tango Down Coupon with purchase of ATI Radeon HD5670 video card or above

HDD: 1TB SATA-III 6.0Gb/s 64MB Cache 7200RPM HDD [+28] (Single Hard Drive)

LANSURGE: GigaByte Lightning Guardian Angel LAN Surge Protector [+18]

MEMORY: 12GB (2GBx6) DDR3/1600MHz Triple Channel Memory Module [+144] (Corsair Dominator [+108])

MONITOR: * 24" Widescreen 1920x1080 Sceptre E246W-1080P (23.6" Viewable)(Black Color) LED Backlight, Built-in Speaker, DVI, HDMI Input [+248]

MOTHERBOARD: * (3-Way SLI Support) GigaByte GA-X58A-UD3R Intel X58 Chipset SLI/CrossFireX Ultra Durable™3 Triple-Channel DDR3/1600 ATX Mainboard w/ 7.1 Dolby Audio, eSATA, GbLAN, USB3.0, 2 x SATA-III RAID, IEEE1394a, 4 Gen2 PCIe, 2 PCIe X1 & 1 PCI [+42]

MULTIVIEW: Xtreme Performance in SLI/CrossFireX Gaming Mode Supports Single Monitor

NETWORK: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network

OS: Microsoft® Windows® 7 Professional [+135] (64-bit Edition)

OVERCLOCK: Extreme OC (Extreme Overclock 20% or more) [+49]

POWERSUPPLY: * 950 Watts - Corsair CMPSU-950TX 80 Plus Power Supply - Quad SLI Ready [+157]


SOFT1: Free Microsoft® Office® 2010 STARTER EDITION (Reduced-Functionality versions of Word and Excel that include advertising)

SOFT2: McAfee AntiVirus Plus 2011 [+15]

SOUND: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO

SURGE1: Ultra U12-40629 7 Outlet Surge Protector Black 6 Individual On/Off Switch [+20]

TEMP: NZXT Sentry-2 Fan Touch Screen Fan Control & Temperature Display [+29]

USB: Built-in USB 2.0 Ports

VIDEO: AMD Radeon HD 6870 1GB GDDR5 16X PCIe Video Card [+185] (Major Brand Powered by AMD)

VIDEO2: AMD Radeon HD 6870 1GB GDDR5 16X PCIe Video Card [+270] (Major Brand Powered by AMD)



Did I make a good choice??? Like I said it's my first gaaming PC after years of console gaming and I wanted something that I would be able to get the best performance out of for the money. Now I am just second guessing myself on the HDD. THANKS ALL!!!!
a b 4 Gaming
a c 356 G Storage
November 3, 2010 6:06:26 PM

RAID is meant for redundancy, i.e. less down time. This is why most businesses use it and not desktop owners. There is no RAID solution that can protect your data. It is only meant to protect you from a hard drive failure. If a drive in the array fails, your computer can remain running on the remaining drives, unless it's RAID 0. RAID will not protect you from accidental file deletion or viruses. This is why you still need a good backup policy in place.

Your computer specs look good. I'm sure you'll enjoy it. Instead of RAID, I'd recommend a second, larger storage drive and some good backup software. Then you can make backups to the storage drive and not worry about losing your data.
November 3, 2010 6:13:37 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
RAID is meant for redundancy, i.e. less down time. This is why most businesses use it and not desktop owners. There is no RAID solution that can protect your data. It is only meant to protect you from a hard drive failure. If a drive in the array fails, your computer can remain running on the remaining drives, unless it's RAID 0. RAID will not protect you from accidental file deletion or viruses. This is why you still need a good backup policy in place.

Your computer specs look good. I'm sure you'll enjoy it. Instead of RAID, I'd recommend a second, larger storage drive and some good backup software. Then you can make backups to the storage drive and not worry about losing your data.


Again... I am a complete newbie, but I have Learned A LOT over the past year. (I only stared learning the keyboard a year ago and the internet a few months after that.) But luckily I am a quick learner when it comes to techy stuff. I get the idead behing a backup drive, just dont know how to implemant it. Do I just copy all my files to the second drive periodically? And what kind of software would you suggest? Again thank you for your help.
a b G Storage
November 3, 2010 6:32:51 PM

jakebaker13 said:
Again... I am a complete newbie, but I have Learned A LOT over the past year. (I only stared learning the keyboard a year ago and the internet a few months after that.) But luckily I am a quick learner when it comes to techy stuff. I get the idead behing a backup drive, just dont know how to implemant it. Do I just copy all my files to the second drive periodically? And what kind of software would you suggest? Again thank you for your help.


EVerything hawkeye22 said is completely accurate, great explaination. Many external hard drives include some backup software with them. If you are using Windows 7 you can use the backup and restore manager to backup on a schedule to an external hard drive. For a more complete piece of software I use Acronis Trume Image home, allows me to do a full disc backup.

Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
a c 356 G Storage
November 3, 2010 6:49:35 PM
Share

You can get an external drive like Snipergod87 suggested or an internal. It doesn't matter as long as you have somewhere safe to backup your files.

Copying files is the most basic way of backing up. Windows 7 includes backup software. At least the pro version and up does - not sure about the home version. I too use Acronis True Image software for backing up, but there are other popular backup software out there, just google for it. One of the big advantages to backup software over a straight file copy is that backup software knows where to put the files back to on restore. For example, if you were to copy a file from your windows folder, you would then have to remember to copy it back to that folder during a restore. Backup software not only knows which folder the file belongs in, but will recreate the folder if it doesn't exist. Anyhow, I'd recommend backup software over just a straight file copy.
November 3, 2010 6:56:57 PM

Snipergod87 said:
EVerything hawkeye22 said is completely accurate, great explaination. Many external hard drives include some backup software with them. If you are using Windows 7 you can use the backup and restore manager to backup on a schedule to an external hard drive. For a more complete piece of software I use Acronis Trume Image home, allows me to do a full disc backup.


OKay I will have to mess around and find the Backup and restore manager. I truly am sorry for asking for so much help but trust me... everything you have all told me makes complete sense to me. I completley understand it, I just don't know how to go about doing it. For example: How do I find the backup and restore manager? and as far as using Acronis Trume Image home... You said you did full dick backup. Do you mean backing it up to a DVD? and is Acronis Trume Image Home a free program?

Again guys, I am really, really sorry for such basic entry level questions. I have searched all over the web for the information I need but I just can't seem to find it anywhere. I can't tell you how much I appreciate the time you have all taken to answer my question.

P.S. How exactly does "backup" work? I mean the word "backup" seems to imply what it means butWhat exactly does it back up to?

Again thank you all so much! :) 
a b 4 Gaming
a c 356 G Storage
November 3, 2010 7:28:10 PM

In wndows 7, when you click start (the ball on the lower left), just type "backup" without the quotes and it should show the backup manager. It should be fairly straight forward. If not, access it's help files.

When I backup via Acronis, I have it backup to a 1Tb drive. That's enough space for me to put multiple backups on it if needed. Acronis has a free trial version I do believe. It lasts 15 days. You need to purchase it after that.

You can backup to most any storage device provided it has enough space. You can even split a backup if needed, but it's less convenient. Even a small 80 gig drive would require 18 DVD's to backup to. A single layer DVD holds ~4.7 gig.

Acronis:
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage...
November 3, 2010 9:04:46 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
In wndows 7, when you click start (the ball on the lower left), just type "backup" without the quotes and it should show the backup manager. It should be fairly straight forward. If not, access it's help files.

When I backup via Acronis, I have it backup to a 1Tb drive. That's enough space for me to put multiple backups on it if needed. Acronis has a free trial version I do believe. It lasts 15 days. You need to purchase it after that.

You can backup to most any storage device provided it has enough space. You can even split a backup if needed, but it's less convenient. Even a small 80 gig drive would require 18 DVD's to backup to. A single layer DVD holds ~4.7 gig.

Acronis:
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage...


That was why I was confused. I would have to go through an ungodlly about of cd's to backup my files.
November 5, 2010 9:10:17 PM

Best answer selected by jakebaker13.
!