Origin of these errors?

I am having alot of anomalies and errors with a system I built recently. here's a list of what happened(and these all happened on different windows sessions):

1) upon booting up I got a error:
BCCode : 7f BCP1 : 00000000 BCP2 : 00000000 BCP3 : 00000000
BCP4 : 00000000 OSVer : 5_1_2600 SP : 3_0 Product : 256_1

2) Here's the strangest one: I was surfing the internet and all of the sudden the graphics got glitched and unreadable. There was this loud whining from my video card I never heard before ever...it seems it's own fan was running at top speed. I had to do a hard reset.

3) Upon booting up, when detecting the harddrives, the motherboard did not detect any and just hang. I had to do a hard reset.

4) Error code 0000007f, parameter1 00000000, parameter2 00000000, parameter3 00000000, parameter4 00000000.

Please remember that these were not in a row, but each happened at different times of use in different windows sessions.


So, it's obvious it's hard ware related. This system is a brand new system I just built about a month ago(with the exception of the 500 watt power supply, cd rom, and pci express video card which are old but seem to be working with no problems). To try and save money and not replace everything at once, what should I buy first to replace?
6 answers Last reply
More about origin errors
  1. You might want to check this out. http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm List of stop errors, and what can cause them. The site has more ind depth articles they link to.

    Quoted from the site

    0x0000007F: UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP
    One of three types of problems occurred in kernel-mode: (1) Hardware failures. (2) Software problems. (3) A bound trap (i.e., a condition that the kernel is not allowed to have or intercept). Hardware failures are the most common cause (many dozen KB articles exist for this error referencing specific hardware failures) and, of these, memory hardware failures are the most common.

    General Troubleshooting of STOP Messages

    If you can’t find a specific reference to your problem, running through the following checklist stands a good chance of resolving the problem for you. This checklist is also usually the best approach to troubleshooting some specific Stop messages, such as 0x0A and 0x50.

    1. Examine the “System” and “Application” logs in Event Viewer for other recent errors that might give further clues. To do this, launch EventVwr.msc from a Run box; or open “Administrative Tools” in the Control Panel then launch Event Viewer.
    2. If you’ve recently added new hardware, remove it and retest.
    3. Run hardware diagnostics supplied by the manufacturer.
    4. Make sure device drivers and system BIOS are up-to-date.
    5. However, if you’ve installed new drivers just before the problem appeared, try rolling them back to the older ones.
    6. Open the box and make sure all hardware is correctly installed, well seated, and solidly connected.
    7. Confirm that all of your hardware is on the Hardware Compatibility List. If some of it isn’t, then pay particular attention to the non-HCL hardware in your troubleshooting.
    8. Check for viruses.
    9. Investigate recently added software.
    10. Examine (and try disabling) BIOS memory options such as caching or shadowing.

    NOTE: When a STOP message occurs, Windows can create a debug file for very detailed analysis. To do this, it needs a workspace equal to the amount of physical RAM you have installed. If you resize your Win XP pagefile minimum to less than the size of your physical RAM, you will get an advisory message that your system may not be able to create a debugging information file if a STOP error occurs. My advice is to go ahead with this change if you want, but simply remember the limitation so that you can change it back if you need to troubleshoot STOP messages. Some general troubleshooting principles are suggested in the Resource Kit for approaching STOP messages overall.
  2. If you get a stop error, Memtest. Should be standard procedure by now...
  3. i did a memtest for 6 passes with no errors. what about:


    2) Here's the strangest one: I was surfing the internet and all of the sudden the graphics got glitched and unreadable. There was this loud whining from my video card I never heard before ever...it seems it's own fan was running at top speed. I had to do a hard reset.

    3) Upon booting up, when detecting the harddrives, the motherboard did not detect any and just hang. I had to do a hard reset.

    would this be from bad ram or bad ram settings?
  4. Ok so RAM is good, let's eliminate them from the equation.

    Generally when the Graphics Card screeches at you it's because the 6-8p in power connector/s aren't plugged in. So if you're getting that it could indicate a failing PSU. I'm thinking the only other option would be the motherboard.

    Other symptoms of a failing PSU is random restarts, failing to turn on some of the time, usb ports randomly stop working.

    Other symptoms of a faulty motherboard. Freezing, crashes, etc.

    I doubt it's your RAM at this point.
  5. no random restarts. doesn't the motherboard regulate the voltages? if so, would it of been responsible for the surge to the video card?

    what about after the system posts and detects hard drives, is ram being used?
  6. As far as i know RAM is being used as soon as you hit the power button. And yes the Motherboard is responsible for regulating power. And it could very well be responsible for the whole mess.
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