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Vcore Fluctuation

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December 26, 2010 2:19:12 AM

I am in the process of my first overclock. I am overclocking my 965BE on a Asus Crosshair IV Formula by way of increasing multipliers. Currently I am sitting at 4.2ghz with a multiplier of 21 and Vcore set to Auto. I goofed off for a bit, rand 3dMark06 and 15 minutes of Prime95 without issue. Even after the 15 minutes of Prime95 my Core temp was bouncing between 53 and 55C.

Since I feel the system is stable, I decided to attempt to reduce my Vcore in hopes to decrease core temps even further (hopefully this is not a bad idea). My question is this: I set my Vcore to 1.425 in the bios but after running 3DMark06 with HWMonitor in the background, it shows my max Vcore at 1.44. Does my system continue to vary my Vcore depending on load even after I set a specific value?

Thanks for your input.

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December 26, 2010 4:48:40 PM

I guess that makes my next newb question:

"If the bios allows the Vcore to fluctuate depending on load, what good does it do to set a specific value?"
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December 28, 2010 2:26:10 AM

It is adjusting the power for load etc. As I am sure you have experienced a vcore too low it will bsod. While overclocking I start with the lowest value and try to boot, if it boots I run prime that will tell you if stable (will bsod if not enough vcore) then I up it by .01 each try. I reboot test repeat.. That way I can apply the absolute lowest vcore i can have
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December 28, 2010 6:30:57 PM

fobnicat said:
I guess that makes my next newb question:

"If the bios allows the Vcore to fluctuate depending on load, what good does it do to set a specific value?"


You think it's bad now ... just wait :o 

You're running jussssst a bit out of spec and your bump ain't nuthin'

Your BIOS setting establishes a base line. Your processor will raise and lower voltage above and below the baseline to each single core, much less the entire die, dependent upon load.
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January 4, 2011 12:33:09 AM

Best answer selected by fobnicat.
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