Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Cpu overheating

Tags:
  • CPUs
  • Temperature
  • Processors
Last response: in CPUs
Share
July 15, 2009 4:23:51 PM

I have an Intel Pentium 4 processor and I'm running Windows XP Pro. The processor is overheating. I downloaded ASUS PC Probe (

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/265-asus-pc-probe.htm... ) and it shows the CPU temperature to be around 95C. It shows warnings for +3.3 (1.58V) and

+5.0 (1.70V). I also get messages from PC Probe about Power Temperature (the temperature seems to surge up to around 240C but then drops back to

around 9C).

One of the fans in my case had stopped running, which I'm guessing contributed to the processor overheating. However, I replaced this fan and I believe that

there is now adequate cooling in the case (though I could be wrong). After replacing the fan, I had reinstalled the processor and heat sink according to the

following instructions:

http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/appinstruct/as5/ins_as5...

At first, my reinstall of the processor/heatsink must have been wrong (too much thermal paste ?) because my machine would shut off after running for about ten

minutes (the processor temperature would go up to about 113C). I cleaned off the thermal paste from the processor and heatsink and reapplied it (correctly, I

believe).

My system now runs but it is slow and if I restart I get a "CPU Over Temperature Error". I haven't made any changes in the BIOS as far as overclocking. My

system is about 4 years old.

I'm trying to figure out how to determine the cause of the overheating -- whether I need to replace the processor itself or the heatsink or if possibly the

motherboard is the problem (or something else). I'm looking at replacing the entire system, but first I'd like to see if it's possible to fix what I have.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks in advance.


Brad

More about : cpu overheating

a b à CPUs
July 15, 2009 6:56:49 PM

try a new fan
July 15, 2009 7:11:06 PM

Upendra09 said:
try a new fan


Wow, that was helpful!

What are your current temps? Make sure you HS is properly connected to the mobo. One loose pin can cause heat issues.
Related resources
a b à CPUs
July 15, 2009 7:26:14 PM

Take the side panel off and check the fan is actually working, as AMDThunder said; One loose pin can cause heat issues.
Is this a later P4 with the pushpin type heatsink? If so it may be the pins have deformed and are not holding it properly, this is a known issue with this type of mechanism.
July 15, 2009 7:39:49 PM

AMDThunder said:
Wow, that was helpful!

What are your current temps? Make sure you HS is properly connected to the mobo. One loose pin can cause heat issues.



You mean the current temps according to ASUS PC Probe ? If so, it's showing the CPU at around 90C today (a little better than yesterday -- the Arctic Silver instructions mentioned a breaking-in period). Motherboard temp is 37C, Power is 7C. CPU also is showing ~4500 rpm.

I believe I connected the heatsink correctly, but maybe I'll recheck it.

The machine is definitely running better today, but since the CPU temp is still high, I'm figuring I need to make some sort of change. Yesterday and earlier today I was having problems even getting Windows to load -- disk read errors on start-up, for instance. I booted via my Windows XP CD and ran chkdsk. After that, I was able to boot.

By the way, what CPU temp would be acceptable ? 50C ?

Thanks again.


Brad
a c 380 à CPUs
July 15, 2009 7:42:42 PM

Are you using the stock heat sink?
If so, a oem heat sink can help.

Is the heat sink installed properly?
Push pin coolers can be tricky to install.
A bad installation can lead to higher temperatures, and even cpu throttling.
With the pc powered down, gently rock the cooler to see if it is on solid, or if it wobbles a bit.
Push pin coolers are best installed while the motherboard is outside of the case.
You need to be able to look at the back of the board to verify that
all 4 pins are completely through and locked.
Play with the pins on the cooler first, so you can see exactly how they work.
Read the instructions that came with your retail cpu.
When pushing down on the pins, do a diagonal pair first.
If you don't, it is hard to get the last pin in.
Don't forget to clean the parts and reapply fresh thermal compound every time.
Don't try to reuse the TIM.
Rubbing alcohol is OK as a cleaner.
I use a paper coffee filter to clean with because it is lint free.
Any name brand TIM should be OK(as-5, Mx-2, etc.)
When applying the TIM, don't use too much, because it can act as an insulator.
Don't apply too little, either, because it won't spread and fill the microscopic
imperfections in the surfaces. A dollop about the size of a grain
of rice should be about right.

How is your case cooling? What case do you have?
Take the side panel off, and direct a house fan at the innards. If the problem goes away, you have a case cooling issue.

What vga card do you have? What kind of a cooler does it have? A good double slot cooler for the vga card can have big benefits to cpu cooling.
July 15, 2009 7:48:15 PM

coozie7 said:
Take the side panel off and check the fan is actually working, as AMDThunder said; One loose pin can cause heat issues.
Is this a later P4 with the pushpin type heatsink? If so it may be the pins have deformed and are not holding it properly, this is a known issue with this type of mechanism.


The case has a clear view into the computer, so I can tell that the fans are running. Even so, I've opened the case and made sure that all fans (including the one on the heatsink) are running.

The processor has "fasteners" (that's the word used in the installation instructions). That may be the same thing you're referring to when you say pushpin. I think one of them may have gotten bent when I was reinstalling it; I think I sort of "straightened" it out. I'll double-check that the pins/fasteners are inserting correctly into the motherboard.

Thanks again.


Brad
July 15, 2009 8:11:09 PM

Wow, 90C is way too hot. Don't run it any more than you have to.
!