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Dillema

Last response: in Work & Education
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January 30, 2011 5:03:03 AM

Okay, so here is the issue.

The town I live in has a good computer store. The local techs there are friendly, and I poke my head in there once in a while and maybe purchase a CPU or something. I have also been looking for a job, so I went in and asked them questions:

Me:"Hey, do you guys need any help around here?"

Tech:"Well, ask the Boss!"

(I walk over to tech 2)

Me:"So you're the Boss?"

Tech2:"Well, I wouldn't say that, but I guess at the moment! :D  "

(Everyone laughs)

* I asked him the same question*

tech2:"Well, not at the moment, but if we need any extra help we could contact you?"

Me:'Okay. Do you want my contact?"

tech2:"Sure, just write it down here."

(I write down the contact info)

Me:"Is this legible?"

(tech2 looks at it. Looks at third tech)

tech2:' Hey,(looking at tech3), he spells better than you :D "

(Everyone laughs again)

tech2:"He may even take your job :D  "

(Again, laughter)

We all say thanks and have a good day.

My issues is what do they expect form me. To be a great IT tech or some ameture who just wants to fiddle with computers? I really want to be serious about this, but I am afraid they will laugh at me for just being a kid who works around computer. Do I tell them I would like training for more advanced work, or do they know I can do the menial while they handle the serious stuff? What will they do with me? Will I do basic cleaning of computers and replacing hardware while they are soldering and reconfiguring?

More about : dillema

January 30, 2011 5:38:44 AM

Can you even do the soldering? If you can't (and if they even do that kind of work there) you expect them to train you? You said kid in your post, and from prior posts of yours I'm pretty sure you're under 18yo, they might not hire you at all. I and everyone else here has no idea what skills they want you to have or what tasks they might let you do. I would imagine that a shop that takes peoples money would want you to be A+ certified at least. If their workers are insured against damage or theft, they might even need you to be older then 21 or 25.

I know you like to worry so here is what I'd do. Wait a few days after you left your info and go back. Talk to the guy in charge and talk to him about your concerns. Let him know you really want to work there, and see if there is anything you can do to improve your chances. Realize however that with the economy the way it is, they aren't likely to spend a bunch of money on you to improve your skills. If you want to learn soldering or PCB diagnostics, this isn't likely to happen.
January 30, 2011 5:43:30 AM

dogman_1234 said:
My issues is what do they expect form me. To be a great IT tech or some ameture who just wants to fiddle with computers? I really want to be serious about this, but I am afraid they will laugh at me for just being a kid who works around computer. Do I tell them I would like training for more advanced work, or do they know I can do the menial while they handle the serious stuff? What will they do with me? Will I do basic cleaning of computers and replacing hardware while they are soldering and reconfiguring?



Aren't these questions best answered by the shop you're seeking employment with? These are questions you might bring up when they actually let you know if they actually have an opening first. I probably wouldn't go "hey guys, i need training", as that's a huge red flag. It really depends on the shop I suppose as to what they'll be doing with you if they do hire you. It depends on how big the shop is, and what kind of shop they are. If they're a "ma and pa" shop, it will differ from a *good* shop. Some shops have guys that have been doing it for years and years, and don't have the time / need to train someone that's a shadetree technician. Some shops are full of people that are learning themselves, so you might fit right in (Best Buy? :-P )
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January 30, 2011 2:04:08 PM

I never said anything about employment. If I wanted employment, I would have given them a resume. I was just wanting to help around the shop for things they don't really have time to do, like clean the back room or something; even clean computer.
January 30, 2011 3:57:20 PM

I don't remember if you live in the USA. There are laws about working under the table. Not saying they wouldn't do it, but most legit business's don't.
January 30, 2011 5:26:00 PM

dogman_1234 said:
I have also been looking for a job, so I went in and asked them questions:




dogman_1234 said:
I never said anything about employment. If I wanted employment, I would have given them a resume.



Um, your first message said you were looking for a job. Am I missing something?
January 30, 2011 6:11:12 PM

I HAVE been looking for a job. I also want to help out somewhere. Really, I just want to do something productive.
January 30, 2011 6:30:26 PM

So you want to intern at a shop......? Or why not just get a job at the shop. I guess i'm missing why you want to work for free at a shop when you could get paid.
January 30, 2011 6:47:39 PM

Intern maybe, just to get the hands on in the shop. Make an impression. I am also in the act of investigating a A+ certificate. While I wait, I will study. Do you know a shop whee I can get the material to study for the A+ test?
January 31, 2011 12:05:22 AM

The A+ test is pretty much basic knowledge for anyone with some background in computer repair. There are free study guides all over the web for it, it's nothing hard though.
January 31, 2011 4:27:31 AM

Can you recommend a complete study guide that will allow me to have the materials needed, the experience, and the necessity to get the Certificate and have the needed skills to perform the basic.
February 1, 2011 2:43:47 AM

dogman_1234, I think you most likely caught the laughing guys on a "bad day" and they were just in one of those moods where being helpful to a younger person was the last thing on their minds! That being said, you *might* want to consider going back another day and speaking with someone else, OR calling the store first and seeing if you can arrange to speak with the manager responsible for hiring BEFORE wasting the time to go there.

WARNING:
I have been in "big" computer stores employing a dozen in-house technicians that only had an interest in parting a customer from their money as quickly as possible! This is not to say they didn't "fix" the customer's issue, but what sort of fix is switching a customer from Outlook Express and downloading e-mail from their ISP to using some other web-based e-mail account? -- This is a "fix" I watched a (so-called) experienced computer technician do for a paying customer one time! I did not say anything because I was the "ride-along Trainee" that day and did not feel as if it was my place to tell a host how to do their job (at $99 dollars an hour; with a one hour minimum).

So, yes the customer was "fixed" and had e-mail working again, but they were left with the task of notifying all their contacts of the change in e-mail addresses and picking up the pieces of misplaced work in their inaccessible Outlook Express account. It is almost pointless to say I did not go to work for this family owned, computer repair franchise with around sixty stores nationwide, but I suppose they are still in business today.

Business is all about providing a legitimate service or product to people at a price that allows YOU to obtain it, store it, deliver it and back it with some type of warranty (if possible). So interviewing with a business owner is going to hinge on YOU demonstrating a basic knowledge of business principals and an ability (or at least willingness) to support those principals. It does not matter if the job is sweeping the shop floor and emptying the trash, if you get hired and somebody comes along with a way to do it better, faster or less expensively, be ready to BE REPLACED! -- This is a fundamental concept in the Employeer-Employee Relationship that makes going to work for yourself more attractive every day!

Simply because a business is larger or appears "well established" in a community, does not mean they follow Best Practices or adhere to ethical standards in the conduct of that business.

National statistics are often quoted as ninety-seven percent of all business conducted in the U.S. is done by small businesses (with something like twenty of fewer employees). So keep in mind that each employee is (essentially) responsible for one-twentieth of the expenses and a similar amount of the revenue (or income). So when you go into a business it is important to understand where the money comes from, where it goes, and how reliable the business model being used to generate it is in each case.

I hope some of this is helpful in your seach for employment.

~
February 1, 2011 2:56:39 AM

@ Echo,

In the context of *might*, that means...
February 1, 2011 5:10:28 AM

Might means you dont want to waste your time going down there to have some worker taking the rip and making you feel like crap just because they are having a bad day themselves (imo),
Second option means,

Prepare before the phonecall,
Think about what it is you actually want from them, a paid job, unpaid experience and learning the trade,or just a shop to hang out in?
You need to present clearly what you would like from this arrangement, this will also help give a good impression of you to the potential boss.

Think about the questions you want to know the answers to and write them down so you dont forget to ask them, being organised will help you stay calmer and focussed too.
Ask about your duties and responsibilities, what they will want from you, that kind of thing, and what you can expect from them in return, whether its money, knowledge or old systems to practice on,
one thing I would strongly advise when you do contact them, be honest, if you have little/no experience in something tell them upfront.
Moto
!