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New HDD

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November 25, 2010 12:12:11 PM

I am looking to add a new HHD to my system and i am looking at a 1 TB Samsung spinpoint F3. The price seems good and i need more storage.

My system is as follows
Processor Manufacturer: AMD
Processor Type: Athlon II 2 X 250
Motherboard : Gigabyte GA-MA770-UD3
Operating System Windows XP Pro SP3
SATA HDD 500GB C (windows) and D (data) partitions
System RAM: 2Gb
Video Card Manufacturer: Nvidea
Video Card Model: Zantac 8600 GT
Video Card RAM: 1GB
Video Card Driver Version: Latest Driver
Sound Realtek onboard Latest Driver

No real problem about installing the HDD but after i install the new HDD i want to copy the windows partition (C) to the new HDD and then remove the partition on the old HHD and use that for data storage downloads documents ect. Is there a good free programme that will let me make an image of the windows partition and copy that to the new HDD and remove the partition on the old HDD without destroying the data on it.

Dose the new HDD need to be on SATA 1 or does it not really matter.

More about : hdd

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a b U Graphics card
a c 357 G Storage
November 26, 2010 2:19:23 AM

What you really need is called cloning software. I don't know if Samsung has a free one you can download from their website. Other HDD makers do, BUT they only work for their drives. If not from Samsung, you can buy good ones - Acronis True Image is widely used and works well, and it does a LOT more than just cloning.

With a cloning utility you install it on your existing HDD. Then you install the new HDD in your machine (no, it does NOT have to be on a particular SATA port) and run the cloning software. You MUST be VERY sure to specify which HDD is the Source, and which is the Destination, so that you don't wipe clean the Source (older drive) by mistake! The utility will make a complete copy of absolutely everything on your old HDD to the new one, putting all the critical files in the right places, so that the new one can completely replace your old one. In your case, you want the new HDD to become the C: drive that you boot from, and that is easy by cloning.

Any new HDD needs to have two preparation steps done on it before an OS can use it. You must Create on it one (or more) Partitions to be used as "drives", and then Format each of these. A Cloning software utility actually does these things for you before making the copy. But when it does, you CAN take some control and manage HOW it does that. For example, although some will default to making the copied clone the same size as the original drive, you may want it to be much bigger and you would need to set that manually.

In your case your existing HDD unit has two Partitions on it, C: and D:. With the cloning software you could merely clone the C: drive only and make any size adjustment you want. OR, you could clone ALL of your Partitions (there are only 2) to the new HDD unit, and here the size options get a little different. Often the default action in this case is called "Proportional" Partitions. That means the sizes created on the new HDD would be in the same proportions as the (2) Partitions on the old HDD, and the TOTAL of both would be the entire new HDD. For example, suppose your 500 GB unit now has a C: drive of 100 GB and a D: drive of 365 GB for a total of 465 GB of space. The 1 TB new unit has about 930 GB available. A Proportional creation of Partitions on the 1 TB unit would make a new C: Partition of about 200 GB, and a D: of about 730 GB. Again, if that is not how you want it done, you can manually change the sizes at the beginning of using the cloning tool, BEFORE these Partitions are created and filled up with the copies.

Once you have made your clone(s) on the new HDD, I recommend you disconnect the old HDD and plug the new HDD into the same mobo port the old one was using. When you boot up the BIOS will look to that same port it always used for booting and boot from the HDD it finds there. Your system will look the same as before, except that your drives will be bigger!

AFTER you have run this way for a while and are satisfied it's all working and all your data really was cloned properly, you can reconnect the old HDD to a new mobo port and decide what to do with it. Up to this point, it has been a safe perfect backup of your system before the cloning took place. But now, with ALL your old data safe on the new HDD, you can afford to Delete both old Partitions on the old HDD and re-Partition and Format it as you like.
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November 26, 2010 9:07:03 AM

Best answer selected by albion221.nnThanks Paperdoc good answer it makes things very clear.
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