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I7 920 NEHALEM, BLOOMFIELD, XEON...

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July 22, 2009 11:46:20 PM

ok.. im a little confused on all these.. i get that getting a do over a co is better but what's the deal with the bloomfield- nehalem-xeon stuff.....?? thanks guys
July 22, 2009 11:48:20 PM

Xeon is the server CPU if I'm not mistaken.
July 22, 2009 11:53:57 PM

ya.. i think so but, iv'e heard it might a better chip to use in a gaming rig...???
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July 22, 2009 11:57:37 PM

They probably are different sockets and you can't overclock on server motherboards
July 23, 2009 12:14:44 AM

maybe.. seen some people saying on the help me build my rig forums get the 920 bloomfield.. what the heck is that? is it the xeon? argh.. i only see that and i7 920 nehalem's on newegg..
July 23, 2009 12:25:03 AM

ballbuster said:
maybe.. seen some people saying on the help me build my rig forums get the 920 bloomfield.. what the heck is that? is it the xeon? argh.. i only see that and i7 920 nehalem's on newegg..


Bloomfield is a Xeon chip, but it is built for regular X58 motherboards with the LGA1366 socket. What they are telling you to get might be this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... which is the i7 920 equivalent. There is a $20-30 price difference between the two, which is probably not worth it.

edit: The i7 950 and the i7 975 Extreme are also Bloomfield chips.
July 23, 2009 12:29:27 AM

Bloomfield is the way to go if you want the latest, greatest and fastest. IMO there is nothing better than the best you can get.
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July 23, 2009 6:45:43 AM

From this Wikipedia article I take the following:

- Nehalim is the name of the microarchitecture. This microarchitecture could (and will) appear in a lot of chips.

- Bloomfield is the project that created the first family of processors using the Nehalim microarchitecture: the "Core i7 9xx" series as well as the Xeon "W35xx" series.


The Core i7 processors are intended for use in desktop systems, while the equivalent Xeons are intended for workstations. For example, the Xeon W3520 is essentially identical to a Core i7 920 except that it supports ECC memory.
July 23, 2009 8:53:02 AM

^ except the W35xx series.

also server chips generally have better silicon, allowing a higher overclock, hence why W3540's are used over 920's by extreme overclockers.
July 23, 2009 2:55:51 PM

ok..think i get it.. although i have seen most non xeon 920's labeled as a nehalem and a few labeled as bloomfield. are they the same?
July 23, 2009 2:59:01 PM

ballbuster said:
ok..think i get it.. although i have seen most non xeon 920's labeled as a nehalem and a few labeled as bloomfield. are they the same?


I don't believe any of the 920's should be Bloomfield. The older i7 920, 940 and 965 were Nehalem based while the newer i7 930, 950 and 975 are Bloomfield chips
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July 23, 2009 3:04:38 PM

Quote:
Current Xeon's will work in X58 mobo's. Big difference is that they have a 2nd QPI to communicate with a 2nd processor


1958273,10,389157 said:
^ except the W35xx series.

Exactly - the Xeon W35xx series chips are uniprocessor systems that really are clones of the Core i7 9xx chips, except for the added ECC capability. They will not work in dual-socket systems.

The Xeon E55xx and X55xx series processors are dual-processor capable and designed for use in motherboards with 2 sockets. This means you can have up to 8 "real" cores in a system, and 16 hyperthreaded cores. But you pay a lot extra to get the dual-processor capability...
[/quote]
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July 23, 2009 3:11:44 PM

ballbuster said:
ok..think i get it.. although i have seen most non xeon 920's labeled as a nehalem and a few labeled as bloomfield. are they the same?


Sort of. There are many processors that use the Nehalim microarchitecture. The first family of processor types produced this microarchitecture were from the "Bloomfield" project. The Core i7 9xx and Xeon W35xx processors are the names of the processors that were produced by that project.

See: Wikipedia - Intel Nehalem (microarchitecture)
July 23, 2009 3:38:00 PM

lostandwandering said:
I don't believe any of the 920's should be Bloomfield. The older i7 920, 940 and 965 were Nehalem based while the newer i7 930, 950 and 975 are Bloomfield chips


You have no clue, Nehalem is the General Architecture and Die size, in Nehalem's case it refers to Core iX 45nm.

Bloomfield is features and number of cores, 'Bloom' referring to the processor having a triple channel IMC, and 'field' referring to the fact that it is a Quad core processor.

so you have, Nehalem -> Bloomfield, Lynnfield and Gainestown.

In Lynnfield, 'Lynn' refers to the processor using the 45nm die size, having onboard controllers and having a dual channel IMC.

Then in Gainestown, 'Gaines' refers to having the same features as Bloomfield, except it can use ECC memory. and 'Town' refers to it being a Server CPU and that it can be either a dual or quad core processor.
July 23, 2009 5:25:45 PM

HMMMMMMM .................... Getting a little upset are we?
July 23, 2009 7:59:37 PM

xtc28 said:
HMMMMMMM .................... Getting a little upset are we?


Seriously. If I'm wrong, tell me I'm wrong. Don't be an a$$ about it. :pfff: 
July 23, 2009 8:12:13 PM

^ Nah, I think he thought I was angry because most people on this forum never make such a long post unless they're annoyed about something.

Anyway, hopefully that summary will help some people in understanding Intel.
July 23, 2009 9:38:57 PM

Helloworld is right on the money! And was right in the above post. I wasnt insinuating anything else about you lostandwandering. thinking about it now...... i get why you thought that. Ill quote next time.
!