High i7 stock temps

Hi,

I recently built a new rig with an i7 920 in a Antec 902 case. All the cooling is stock, just the stock HSF and case fans. I am just worried that the temps are unusually high. Idle with all the fans on high is about 38 and load after about 45 min of prime95 hits 90. I stopped the test there but it did appear to be leveling off.

Is there a chance that the heat sink just didn't seat right? Or is the stock cooler really that bad?

Thanks,
Alex
17 answers Last reply
More about high stock temps
  1. which stepping CPU do you have?

    because I think the C0's would reach those kind of temps with the stock cooler.
  2. I tried reseating it and the CPU still hits 90C very quickly in prime95. The cores are even higher, up to 7C hotter if that means anything. The processor is also a D0 so i guess that's not it.
  3. You might have just gotten a really bad batch CPU, or you keep moving the heatsink slightly.
  4. I dont think its bad batch..its just that stock HSF aren't that good..get a new cooler -megahalems,zalman or whatever brand it is, definitely way better than stock HSF.
  5. Ive tried reseating it twice now with arctic silver and it seems even worse than before. Within a couple of minutes i stop the test because the temperatures are just climbing without any sign of stopping.

    Every online test of heatsinks i find lists the stock HSF of having load temps in the 60s. Are those accurate for my case or is it expected they be this high in a smaller case?
  6. Have you tried doing these tests with the case cover off? I'm wondering if the heatsink fins are hot to the touch. It seems to me that the fins are cool or not too hot, then it would point to poor contact between the heatsink and the CPU. If the fins are hot then it would point to a fan or air circulation problem...
  7. redkachina said:
    I dont think its bad batch..its just that stock HSF aren't that good..get a new cooler -megahalems,zalman or whatever brand it is, definitely way better than stock HSF.


    They aren't that bad, on some i7 920 D0's you can hit 3.8GHz with the stock cooler.
  8. I tried reseating it for a 3rd time. This one seems to be better with the core temps maxing about 90. The CPUTIN at 82 whatever that means. I never realized there was such an art to thermal paste.

    Are these temps passable or should i just go for an aftermarket HSF? I would be interested in overclocking if possible but probably only to like 3ghz so the cheaper the better.
  9. Also, the heat sink is definitely warm but i dont have any problem holding my finger on there. I would guess that means i get to try again?
  10. Okay well i think i solved part of the problem. I am running this on an ASUS P6T and using the AI Suite software. This software automatically manages the voltage for the processor, sometimes bumping it up to 1.3V at stock speeds. I manually set it to 1.2 in the bios and this has kept the temps down to the 80s at load.

    The only thing is it no longer drops the multiplier back down to 12 to save power. Does anyone know if there's a way to restore this?

    Also, if it is going to be at a constant voltage for stock speeds, what should it be roughly? I have heard of people doing 4ghz with 1.25 so I would guess 1.2V is even a bit high?
  11. sma11s101 said:
    ...if it is going to be at a constant voltage for stock speeds, what should it be roughly? I have heard of people doing 4ghz with 1.25 so I would guess 1.2V is even a bit high?
    I'm running a Xeon W3520 (workstation version of the i7 920, identical except it also supports ECC DRAM) using an ASUS P6T6 WS Revolution motherboard at stock speed (2.66GHz) with all the speeds and voltages set to AUTO in the BIOS, and in the CPUID Hardware Monitor window my CPU VCore is showing as 0.94 (min) to 0.99 (max) volts...
  12. Well I have the exact same problem, I'm starting to wonder whether it is not the Asus P6T motherboard...because I have the same.

    The processor used to be in a UD3R and I had no problem, since I transferred it to the P6T it keeps overheating.
  13. @Crasa
    Well as I had posted before, turning down the voltage in the BIOS has helped me. the AI Suite automatically bumps the voltage between .9 and 1.3. So its fairly cool at idle but load is very hot. So far i have got it down to 1.1V in the BIOS and its 70s at load but a bit hotter at idle since it doesnt drop the voltage down so far. Probably could go lower too.
  14. still way too high, when in the UD3R I never got over 60°C
  15. sminlal said:
    I'm running a Xeon W3520 ... my CPU VCore is showing as 0.94 (min) to 0.99 (max) volts...

    ...so I just spent some time running Prime95 to stress the CPU and it's looking like my ASUS motherboard does the same thing - under load it boosts the voltage to about 1.25V and pushes the CPU to 2.8GHz.

    The temperatures I'm seeing don't really concern me too much though - the CPU core temps are in the mid 30s at idle and seem to top out in the low 70s under full load. The CPU heat spreader temperature stays under 70, which seems to be the max spec for this CPU.
  16. The only thing is, even with my 1.05 volts it still goes to 2.8Ghz with speed step. So whats the point of running all that voltage? Cinebench score is still the same and its still stable, so i dont get it.
  17. sma11s101 said:
    The only thing is, even with my 1.05 volts it still goes to 2.8Ghz with speed step. So whats the point of running all that voltage? Cinebench score is still the same and its still stable, so i dont get it.
    I'm new to these latest processors and motherboards so I'm still learning. But I downloaded the Intel Core i7 Processor Specification Sheet and picked up on two things from it:

    - The i7 920 processor automatically increases the clock multiplier to 21 to yield a 2.8GHz clock speed as long as the heatspreader temperature remains below 70 degrees C.

    - The processor has signal lines that requests specific voltages from the motherboard. So it seems to be the the CPU that's sending the voltage up to 1.25V, not the motherboard.

    I assume that this is done to maintain stability. Intel tests these chips and has programmed into them the thermal and performance envelopes which they feel will guarantee correct operation of the CPU. It's kind of like the max clock speed - you can exceed it, but you're intruding into the safety margin when you do. There's a substantial safety margin there, to be sure, but the further you stray beyond Intel's "line in the sand" the closer you get to grief.

    It really depends on what you use your machine for and what your risk tolerance is as to whether you're willing to override the defaults (up OR down) and to what extent...
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