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Reliable site to purchase Athlon 64 X2 4800+

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July 25, 2009 3:28:45 AM

Hello. I want to upgrade a old Compaq Presario SR1913WM computer and it is only compatible with Athlon 64 X2 Processors up to the 4800+ model. However, the two major Internet retailers I would trust to buy from do not have the processor. I found it at OutletPC, but I can't find any word on their reliability. I was wondering if anyone could confirm that site or direct me to a reputable Internet retailer that still had this processor in stock please? Thank you.
July 25, 2009 3:43:55 AM

Good luck. A socket 939 X2 4800+ is a rare chip and used people are asking ridiculous premiums for them. ($250-400)
http://cgi.ebay.com/AMD-Athlon-64X2-Dual-Core-4800+-2.4...
http://cgi.ebay.com/AMD-Athlon-64X2--Dual-Core-4800+-To...

hate to say this, but it is extremely unlikely you would even find that CPU at a reasonable price. More than likely you could do an AM2+ mobo, faster dual core CPU, and 4GB of DDR2 for FAR cheaper than a used S939 4800+.

edit: BTW, outletpc has the AM2 version. You need the rare/expensive S939 version like this one: ;) 
http://www.alvio.com/product_view.aspx?product_ID=1588&...
July 25, 2009 3:47:47 AM

Right. I've seen that, and there is no way in hell I'd pay 250 for it. Like you suggested, I'd try some other alternative. However, this seems like a good/decent deal on such a rare item, but I just don't know the site.

Edit: Didn't catch the difference between the socket types. Thanks for pointing that out.
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July 25, 2009 3:49:47 AM

I would agree with pauldh in recommending a MB replacement.... The 939 CPU your looking for just isn't an economical route to go.
July 25, 2009 3:53:03 AM

Yeah, be very careful as the socket AM2 4800+ isn't worth didly in comparison. I wouldn't be surprised if scammers try to sell Am2 ones by either not listing the socket, or attempting to trick people into thinking it may be S939.

Just so you know, almost all S939 dual cores have been rare / expensive for the past year anyway. So at least you don't need to feel you just recently missed out on snatching one up.
July 25, 2009 4:16:00 AM

At this point a new mobo replacement means getting a cpu from a more recent line of processors too. I'm upgrading pretty much every essential component (memory, gpu, hard disk, and psu). I'm looking for something economical (<= 550 USD for all components including shipping). What would you recommend please?

I have my eye on a hard disk, so maybe that will help narrow down the price range. I'm eyeing the Western Digital VelociRaptor 150GB 10000 RPM 16MB Cache. The 10000 RPM would probably smoke and it has a twenty dollar mail-in rebate making it 159.99 and free shipping. However, the Western Digital Caviar Black 500GB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache is only 69.99 and has free shipping. Oh well. I guess I'll have to take need (cheap 69.99) over want (10000 RPM). Will it really make too big a difference?

Edit: I've just read about a technique called quarter stroking that may localize disk reads and writes to result in faster performance - perhaps even faster than a performance drive. If this technique is real, the 7200 RPM drive will be more than sufficient for my needs.

If I do get the cheap hard drive, that will leave approximately 480 dollars to spend on the mobo, cpu, memory, gpu, and psu. Whereas the more expensive drive would leave 390 dollars to spend.

P.S. Thanks for steering me away from trying to find a socket 939 processor. Should I start a new thread for this?
July 25, 2009 5:15:29 AM

I'll probably go with the AMD Phenom II X2 550 Black Edition Callisto 3.1GHz as my processor for 99.99 w/ free shipping. It is a moderately priced dual-core processor which has two disabled cores that have the potential to be unlocked when fitted on the right motherboard. Now I just have to select a motherboard that still has a BIOS capable of unlocking said cores. (Of course, I realize one or both might actually be defective or nonfunctional.)

380 dollars remaining for motherboard, memory, gpu, and psu, as well as cpu cooler.
July 25, 2009 5:47:06 AM

According to this article, there is only one motherboard that still has - and intended to keep - a BIOS supporting ACC unlocking of the locked cores. The ASRock M3A790GXH. It has a pretty decent price of 114.99 USD, but no free shipping. (I was beginning to think I might have one of those no shipping costs builds you see every so often.)

It comes in a combo deal with the processor though that saves ten dollars off of the total. However, I wonder if that eliminates the free shipping on the processor?

Less than 275 dollars to 265 dollars remaining for the memory, gpu, psu, and cooling system.

Edit: Crap. I can't tell if my case is a ATX case or a micro-ATX case. I forgot about that. I know my mobo is micro-ATX. However, you can fit a micro-ATX mobo in an ATX case but not vice versa. Time for me to do some research/measuring.
July 25, 2009 6:09:02 AM

My board has no room between its sides and the psu/drive bays. My case must be a micro-atx right?
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July 25, 2009 6:36:59 AM

Micros are generally 9.6" x 9.6 or 9.6 x 7.5. If your board is 12.0 x 9.6 or larger is an ATX mobo. If you determine you definitely have a micro board and its against the case on both sides then its a micro case. There should be 2-4 inches extra from top to bottom if an atx mobo will fit.
July 25, 2009 6:38:40 AM

Thank you for responding. I measured my board and it is about 9.6" square. I was hoping my case would be a little bigger than it though. However, my there's no room between my board and my case, so my case must be micro-atx too right?
July 25, 2009 6:40:41 AM

Thank you addressing the case size too. The board is flush even with the sides of the case and the PSU and internal bays. So the case is micro-atx. Damn. That means I'll have to buy a new case or go back to the drawing board of cpu/mobo selection.
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July 25, 2009 6:48:05 AM

Not a problem. Get this case:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Its cheap, sleek and great quality. I keep suggesting this one to people as I have used it in 2 of my systems, 1 for my wife and the other in my media center setup.

I have seen it for 44.99 and 49.99 so check for other sites or go into a local computer store if you have one nearby.
July 25, 2009 6:53:57 AM

Thank you for the suggestion. I'll keep it in mind if I ever need to build an ATX computer. However, seeing as I have less than 550 dollars to spend, and I'm more into gaming, I feel it would be better to buy a dual core processor other than the Phenom II X2. I can get the Athlon II X2 250 Regor 3.0 GHz for 19 dollars cheaper at the moment, and the mATX motherboard I'm thinking of getting will be 50 dollars cheaper. Plus I won't have to pay 30 to 60 dollars for a new case. That will leave at least 100 more dollars for the GPU. Which I think will be a better investment for gaming than the 0.1 GHz difference between the processors and possibility of two more cores which would probably not help very much even if they did work, because they might not.
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July 25, 2009 7:07:16 AM

A good dual core for now coupled with a mobo that is upgradable to a quad and the best video card you can afford is the best way to go for your budget so it sounds.

2-3 years later you can probably find a quad pretty cheap and give you a decent performance boost.

Sounds like you are going in the right direction...
July 25, 2009 7:11:21 AM

This might be a stupid question, but does a motherboard's north bridge limit what gpus it is compatible with? The motherboard I'm looking at has a north bridge named NVIDIA GeForce 8100. Does that mean I will only be able to use NVIDIA cards? Does that mean that I will only be able to use up to a "GeForce 8100"? Thank you for helping out a noob.
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July 25, 2009 7:20:14 AM

The Gforce 8100 is the built in onboard graphics processor that comes on the motherboard. You can install any video card and disable the onboard video. Some AMD boards have the option to do a hybrid crossfire with the onboard graphics and the video card of your choice.

I prefer getting a really good video card and disabling the onboard, but that's me...
July 25, 2009 7:29:45 AM

Do you think I will need to get a low-profile card, or can I buy one of the full-sized ones? I've read that some computers require low-profile cards, but I haven't found anywhere how to tell if you'll need one. Does mATX automatically limit you to low-profile cards, or can you get a regular card for a mATX case? I know that the width of my case will determine how tall the card can be, because the mobo is vertical inside of mine. However, how tall is a normal graphics card? Thank you.

Edit: I just read a post in the forums that states that the typical graphics card is about 9" long and 4.36" tall. That means it will fit in my case. (It's about 6.5" wide.)
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July 25, 2009 7:39:40 AM

4.5 inches is the normal height. That could be a concern, you will also need to take note about length. The higher end cards are about 10-11 inches long. that will likely be the problem but look at the clearance for both to be sure...
July 25, 2009 7:49:24 AM

The length might be a concern. I'll have to look at the mobo and determine where the pci express 2.0 x16 slot is. If it is at the bottom and the height from top to bottom is 9.6", then it will be good. (The board is 9.6" by 7.5") I checked it. The slot is in the right place and there is enough clearance in my case. Normal size should be fine.

When I'm choosing my card, what factors do I look at? (I promise the questions will stop soon. Thanks for sticking with me this far.)

Right now I'm thinking the main things that will be important to me are the memory size, stream processors, memory interface, and memory type. Bigger is probably better, but even though I'm willing to break the bank, I don't want to. I'll be looking into what each one means, but it's all Greek to me at the moment.
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July 25, 2009 7:59:37 AM

No problem at all although its past my bedtime and my time is over for the night.

You need to look at what you budget for the card and go from there. If you can only do 100.00, 125.00 or 200.00 there are selections to choose from. Decide what you can spend and also what games, resolutions you intend to play. also state the size of your monitor.

There are a lot of video gurus here that can help find the best deal on the best cards at the price you elect to spend. So give that info and you will get help on that soon.
July 25, 2009 8:13:29 AM

Thank you so much. I have less than 178 dollars to buy the GPU, thermal compound, and any other cooling systems I want. (I went ahead and found a good PSU.)
July 25, 2009 8:54:12 AM

Components selected so far:

Edit: Change in component selection. FINAL due to low cost.

Processor:

AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+ Brisbane 3.1GHz 2 x 512KB L2 Cache Socket AM2 89W Dual-Core

Motherboard:

Foxconn A76ML-K AM3 Ready / AM2+ / AM2 AMD 760G Micro ATX

Memory:

G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066 (PC2 8500) Dual Channel Kit

PSU:

Athena Power 550W MicroATX 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC

Miscellaneous:

Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound


Needed components:

GPU.
CPU Fan/Heatsink.
Additional fans/coolers if needed.

By the way, what do you think about open-box items? Any personal experience?
July 25, 2009 9:34:17 AM

I really like the Open Box: ASUS Radeon HD 4850 512MB 256-bit GDDR3. I've heard that the products work, but they may just be missing accessories/manuals/driver cds like an OEM product. How do you install a graphics card without the CD?

I'm guessing you would just build the system using the onboard video, then download the necessary drivers and install them?
July 25, 2009 10:14:19 AM

Oh. And if I get a DVI card, I'll need one of these little adapters because I have a VGA monitor. I wasn't even aware that VGA was getting replaced. :o 
July 25, 2009 4:20:48 PM

Reading some of the clocks reviewers claim, I'm sorely tempted to take your suggestion. However, this opens up the issue of cooling. Because all though you can convince me that the E5200 will obtain better clocks than the Regor (Independent research will quickly verify or refute this.), you will have a tougher time convincing me that the stock fan is capable of effectively displacing heat from the CPU, especially at such a high overclock.
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July 25, 2009 4:33:46 PM

How about this instead a AM3 3.0 Ghz AMD Quad Core CPU and motherboard for around $204.The CPU has been discounted by $46 and another $65 off with the motherboard.
It looks like the best deal since the 3.2 Phenom II X4 955 BE CPU and motherboard combo deals sold out yesterday.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...
July 25, 2009 4:41:25 PM

You're right. It is a good deal. Thank you. However, I really think I'd be better off spending as much as a hundred dollars less getting a dual-core cpu and supporting mobo and spending the money on the GPU instead.
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August 4, 2009 10:42:30 AM

Hey congratulations on your new build.That's quite a substantial improvement.
!