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Quad Core = How Many GHz?

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July 25, 2009 4:45:57 PM

I'm sorry if it's a stupid question, but how many GHz does a quad core deliver? Like the Phenom II X4 940 3.0 GHz, Does that mean it can deliver 12.0 GHz?

More about : quad core ghz

July 25, 2009 4:49:39 PM

no, it delivers 4 lots of 3GHz, and no it isn't the same as 12GHz.
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July 25, 2009 4:51:05 PM

About how many GHz would it be equivilent to then?
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July 25, 2009 5:02:09 PM

its equivalent to 4 cores @ 3GHz
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July 25, 2009 5:10:11 PM

lol
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a b à CPUs
July 25, 2009 5:27:58 PM

Mecha King said:
About how many GHz would it be equivilent to then?
When people ask about GHz what they're really asking about is "how quickly can the CPU do something". The faster the GHz, the faster the CPU can do a given task.

The thing about multiple-core CPUs is that they're really no faster at any one task than a single-core processor (clock speeds being equal). The benefit isn't from being able to do a task faster, it's from being able to do lots of tasks at once.

Think of it like baking a cake. A cake takes, say, 30 minutes to bake. If you have four ovens, it still takes 30 minutes to bake a cake, but now you can bake four of them at once.

So a multiple-core processor really only gives you a benefit if you can somehow arrange to do multiple tasks at the same time. Some programs can do this, some can't. In the cake example, you could cook an entire meal more quickly with 4 ovens because you could roast the turkey in one oven at the same time you're baking the cake in another oven and doing the vegetables in yet another oven, etc. So 4 ovens would really increase your meal-preparation performance.

But it still takes 30 minutes to bake a cake.
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July 25, 2009 5:31:23 PM

Thanks sminlal, the concept of quad cores was eluding me 'til now.
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a b à CPUs
July 25, 2009 7:12:20 PM

smin, unless the recipe is super clever and splits the cake into 4 layers for cooking.

then ull have a cake super fast.
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July 25, 2009 7:27:28 PM

The thing is.. If you get a cake that can be split into 4 parts and put each of them into different ovens, and at the end you put them all together to form 1 cake, then you can bake that cake faster...
Some programs support multi CPU configurations. Lets say you want to play WoW.. When you play it, it uses two cores inside of one at the same time, meaning more FPS(though you can make it only use one). So sometimes it's not just multi-tasking, it's 1 program using many different cores at the same time to double performance.
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July 25, 2009 7:30:20 PM

neon neophyte said:
smin, unless the recipe is super clever and splits the cake into 4 layers for cooking.

then ull have a cake super fast.


No, it would still take just as long. What you'd need would be an oven that could alter the laws of thermodynamics, I think its called i7 ;) 
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July 25, 2009 8:10:52 PM

The cake is a lie.
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a b à CPUs
July 25, 2009 9:15:55 PM

tryceo said:
Some programs support multi CPU configurations. Lets say you want to play WoW.. When you play it, it uses two cores inside of one at the same time, meaning more FPS(though you can make it only use one). So sometimes it's not just multi-tasking, it's 1 program using many different cores at the same time to double performance.
That's why I gave the analogy of preparing a dinner. Dinner that can be made using 4 ovens simultaneously = application that can use 4 cores.

Now if you had a dinner that only required, say, lasagna and a cake and nothing else that needed to go into an oven, that means you'd only get the benefit of two ovens (= 2 cores) even if you had a kitchen with 4 ovens (= a CPU with 4 cores).

Mmm, I'm hungry! :D 
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January 11, 2011 1:29:47 AM

I really laughed at this because everyone uses the cooking analogy, and it is still surprisingly educational.
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March 10, 2012 3:11:20 PM

sminlal said:
When people ask about GHz what they're really asking about is "how quickly can the CPU do something". The faster the GHz, the faster the CPU can do a given task.

The thing about multiple-core CPUs is that they're really no faster at any one task than a single-core processor (clock speeds being equal). The benefit isn't from being able to do a task faster, it's from being able to do lots of tasks at once.

Think of it like baking a cake. A cake takes, say, 30 minutes to bake. If you have four ovens, it still takes 30 minutes to bake a cake, but now you can bake four of them at once.

So a multiple-core processor really only gives you a benefit if you can somehow arrange to do multiple tasks at the same time. Some programs can do this, some can't. In the cake example, you could cook an entire meal more quickly with 4 ovens because you could roast the turkey in one oven at the same time you're baking the cake in another oven and doing the vegetables in yet another oven, etc. So 4 ovens would really increase your meal-preparation performance.

But it still takes 30 minutes to bake a cake.


Sir, I absolutely thank you for such a simple yet effective method for teaching him and I myself and whoever may have learned from this as well. This is such a great example that absolutely clarifies what I needed to know about quad cores and Hertz. Thank you very much and God bless you.
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a c 185 à CPUs
March 10, 2012 3:41:54 PM

It's just "x" number of cores, having each core run at the given ghz. So If I had a quad core processor that was supposed to run at 3ghz, each core would be running at 3ghz.
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August 19, 2012 3:28:25 PM

what is throttol stop? , In multi core processor, which has 2 or more caches, By the use of throttol stop how it speeds up the sys process? It improves what?
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August 19, 2012 3:28:57 PM

what is throttol stop? , In multi core processor, which has 2 or more caches, By the use of throttol stop how it speeds up the sys process? It improves what?
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