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How To - ASUS P67 Motherboard overclocking with SB

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January 26, 2011 5:17:45 PM

This is a GREAT guide for overclocking on ASUS P67 motherboards. there is a detailed write-up and an illustrated version below. Of all the SB Overclocking write-ups i have seen, this is by far the best I have seen thus far.

***Note*** Update to latest BIOS if it is an option, it'll enable some extra overclocking features that are not on the original BIOS.

Please overclock at your own risk as I nor Tom's is to blame for baked CPU's, this is just a helpful link for the curious...

This is a good place to start until i write up a how-to on overclocking with Sandy Bridge or someone beats me to it...

http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1578110
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April 10, 2011 6:58:12 AM

Used this and others to get started tonight. Never one to jump on Rev A Hardware, I waited for the kinks to get washed out and got it panned out bit more than usual this time through. So Son No. 3's build is completed after several days effort, cable sleeving and fitting / routing cables was 'work" but "fun work". Now onto the overclocking. Hoping to take advantage of the efforts of all those who swam these waters before me. Suggestions welcome and appreciated; I have got about 4-5 hours into to BIOS editing and OOCT testing and wanna be in position to hand over to the my drooling son in time to play before the weekend is out.

Here's where I am so far .... prolly will format crappy as THG don't do spreadsheet posts well. Don't quite have the hang of this offset thing and don't wanna use fixed voltage as would like to chill that down under low loads:

AI TWEAKER
AI Overclock Tuner: Manual
BCLK/PEG Frequency:100
Turbo Ratio: By All Cores
By All Cores: 48
Internal PLL: Disabled
Memory Frequency: DDR3-1600
EPU Power Saving: Disabled


CPU Power Management
CPU Ratio Auto
Enhanced Speed Step Tech Enabled
Turbo Mode Enabled
Long Duration Power Limit Auto
Long Duration Maintained Auto
Short Duration Power Limit Auto
Additional Turbo Voltage Auto
Primary Plane Current Limit Auto

Load Line Calibration: High
VRM Frequency: Manual
VRM Fixed Frequency Mode 350
Phase Control:Extreme
Duty Control: Extreme
CPU Current Capability100%
CPU Voltage:o ffset
Sign: +
Offset Voltage: 0.06
DRAM Volatge Auto (1.65)
VCCSA Voltage: Auto (0.925)
VCCIO Voltage: Auto (1.050)
CPU PLL Voltage: Auto (1.796)
PCH Voltage: Auto (1.062)
DRAM Data Reference Voltage (CHA A) Auto
DRAM CTRL Reference Voltage (CHA A) Auto
DRAM Data Reference Voltage (CHA B) Auto
DRAM CTRL Reference Voltage (CHA B) Auto
CPU Spread Spectrum Disabled

ADVANCED
CPU Ratio 3 Auto
Intel Adaptive Thermal Monitoring:Enabled
Hyper Threading Enabled
Active Processor Cores All
Limit CPUID Maximum Disabled
Execute Disable Bit Enabled Enabled
Intel Virtualization Technology Disabled
Enhanced Intel Speed Step Tech Enabled
Turbo Mode Enabled
CPU C1E Enabled
CPU C3 Report A Enabled
CPU C6 Report Enabled

The settings above worked up to 4.7 Ghz .... below are the temps and voltages at 4.4, 4.5, 4.6 and 4.7 ... at 4.8 I BSOD'd and it was 3 am so went to bed .... hope to find some snippets of wisdom in morning :) 

Max Core Temps (OCCT)
x 44.0 x 45.0 x 46 x 47 x 48
Core 1 57 60 62 62
Core 2 61 63 66 66
Core 3 63 65 66 68
Core 4 59 63 64 65
Core Voltage 1.288 1.344 1.36 1.368 1.368
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April 10, 2011 5:14:05 PM

I would increase the VCCIO Voltage to 1.150v or a bit higher. You want the DRAM Voltage and the VCCIO Voltage to be within 0.500v of each other. Once you get close to 5.0GHz overclock (4.7-4.8GHz qualifies as close), increasing the VCCIO Voltage to 1.2v or a bit higher may help stabilize the overclock.

Also, change Internal PLL to Enabled and see if you can get a higher overclock.
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April 10, 2011 7:36:40 PM

OOps, I actually had it enabled on thee 4.7 and 4.8 OC's

But duh....I assumed that since I bought the damn thing the day it appeared on newegg, I didn't need to update. While it was traveling across country in the little brown truck, I downloaded 1202 ...saw 1103 on boot up and convinced myself that age had me remembering a 12 instead of an 11.

Well back to the drawing board.....

Will try your VCCIO recommendation once I get into it again.

Also wanted to as ask about other things I read wit reference to 'the 1 minute overclock" to 4.6 on stock cooler.

http://www.guru3d.com/article/asus-sabertooth-p67-tuf-r...

Quote:
The generic overclock procedure is as follows:

- Leave baseclock for what it is right now
- If optional in the BIOS, increase the TDP limit of your processor to 200 Watts
- With a 2600K set your base multiplier at 34
- And now set the per core multiplier at a maximum of your liking, we applied an MP of 46 on all four cores
- Increase CPU voltage, though setting AUTO might work fine, we applied 1.35V
- Make sure your processor is properly cooled (we used the stock Intel cooler and forced the fan to 70% RPM)
- Save and Exit BIOS / UEFI


1. I gotta imagine when we get up to 1.48 and above, we are past the 95W TDP .... other than this link, I haven't seen this adjustment mentioned. Thoughts ?

2. Again, this is the only place I have seen taking the Base CPU multiplier off Auto and setting to 34.
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April 11, 2011 2:36:27 AM

Oh yeah, but it's usually listed as something different. My board lists it as Turbo Boost Power Limit. Setting it higher will prevent your CPU from throttling down to a lower speed once it gets to that wattage.

Whether setting the base multiplier manually makes a difference, I don't know.
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April 11, 2011 3:26:04 AM

Internal PLL: Disabled??? why?

Max Core Temps (OCCT)
x 44.0 x 45.0 x 46 x 47 x 48
Core 1 57 60 62 62
Core 2 61 63 66 66
Core 3 63 65 66 68
Core 4 59 63 64 65
Core Voltage 1.288 1.344 1.36 1.368 1.368

really?,I overclocked in 45x100 with manual 1.31 v,the temp was just 42C under leisure status,the temp will high to 90C while it full-work on prime 95,which kind of CPU fan you are using?
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April 11, 2011 4:03:09 AM

rookie1973 said:
Internal PLL: Disabled??? why?

Max Core Temps (OCCT)
x 44.0 x 45.0 x 46 x 47 x 48
Core 1 57 60 62 62
Core 2 61 63 66 66
Core 3 63 65 66 68
Core 4 59 63 64 65
Core Voltage 1.288 1.344 1.36 1.368 1.368

really?,I overclocked in 45x100 with manual 1.31 v,the temp was just 42C under leisure status,the temp will high to 90C while it full-work on prime 95,which kind of CPU fan you are using?


1. PLL was recommended to be disabled in this thread for voltages < 1.400 so I gave it a try. Now have it on Auto thru 4.6, Enabled at 4.8

http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1578110

2. Here's my latest settings for 4.8 Ghz

By All cores = 48
LLC = Ultra High
Phase Control = Extreme
Duty Control= Extreme
Offset = 0.50
VCCIO Voltage = 1.15 (to keep within 0.50 of 1.65 RAM Voltage)
CPU Spread Spectrum = Disabled
CPU C1E = Enabled
CPU C3 Report = Enabled
CPU C6 Report = Enabled

Here's the latest round of Idle - Prime 95 temps:

Max Core Temps under (Idle - P95 load)

GHz..... 3.8 ... 4.00 ...... 4.2 ........ 4.4 ........ 4.6 ....... 4.80
Core 1 (51) (31 - 52) (29 - 54) (29 - 56) (31 - 62) (29 - 69)
Core 2 (53) (30 - 54) (30 - 56) (30 - 60) (31 - 66) (28 - 75)
Core 3 (53) (23 - 55) (22 - 57) (22 - 60) (31 - 68) (28 - 79)
Core 4 (51) (29 - 52) (28 - 55) (29 - 57) )31 - 65) (28 - 72)

The 4.8 temps listed above were with offset of 0.060, subsequent runs at 0.040 and 0.050 were unstable. Voltages are 1.400 - 1.408 under load so was looking to see a temperature drop. Got about 25 minutes in, w/ max temps were 66-71-73-67 which is something I can live with....gonna start messing with "Additional Turbo Voltage" next. Unless someone has a better idea ?????? :) 

3. As to the cooler, I'm using the apparent new "top dog", the Thermalright Silver Arrow. Based upon the review at BMR, it tops everything on the market right now. I prefer to use their site instead of others like frostytech as the latter still tests Heat Sinks using an old LGA 775 based system. With stock fans, the only thing that beat it was the Coolermaster V6 GT which I don't like cause the fans are very loud. The Silver Arrow was 0.6C behind the GT w/ stock fans but when the same fan was used on both coolers, the Silver arrow beat it by 3.7 degrees.

The reviewer writes:

Quote:
I think the Silver Arrow represents the ultimate air cooler than can be built and still fit within the constraints of an ATX motherboard and a standard computer case. ...... It's almost ironic that coolers like this are becoming available just as processors transition to designs that may ultimately render them unnecessary; even overclocked to 5GHz, an Intel Sandy Bridge 2600K doesn't need anywhere near this level of cooling. Still, it wouldn't hurt, and as I noted earlier, there are still CPUs out there that can benefit from it.


At close to 80C, I'm not so sure :)  ..... keep in mind that that was my 1st stable OC at 4.8 .... gonna keep experimenting to see if I can lower temps....and hopefully figure out how "Additional Turbo Voltage" factors into the equation.

This box will belong to Son No. 3 when it's done (finishing his freshman year of high school). Given the abuse high schoolers give to puters, once I'm finished, I'll probably stick w/ an everyday 24/7 OC of between 4.4 or 4.6. There's a big temp boost after 4.4 and it requires LLC ...... I don't think the trade-offs will be worth it. With all the hubaloo about SB overclocking, I spent less time getting a 50% OC (2.66 -> 4.0) on Son No. 2's 920 ... best stable OC I reached within my self set 72C temp limit was 4.2 Ghz. The SB's go real easy in the beginning and seems once ya reach a certain point, the temps just take off.

Tomorrow the SSD arrives (Vertex 3) so I will be busy again tomorrow night.
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April 11, 2011 7:06:31 AM

The Offset voltage option you have selected is already giving the CPU extra voltage. Basically the board has a "base voltage" value for your CPU. When you enter in an offset of 0.060, you are telling the board to give the CPU the base voltage plus the offset value. The temps will never go down unless you reduce the voltage.

Additional Turbo Voltage is just that ... when the CPU Turbos the cores up to your overclocked speed, the board gives the CPU that extra voltage (beyond what you are already giving it with the offset voltage you have chosen). If the system is Prime95 stable at the full overclocked speed, it doesn't need any extra voltage. Giving it extra will only increase temps further.

Based on the info you have given, I would suggest setting it back to 4.4GHz like you are already thinking. The extra stress on the CPU (evidenced by the higher temps) just isn't worth it.
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April 12, 2011 12:40:45 AM

I am using intel stock cpu fan,i think it is reason the temps is certainly high when it is launching under the Auda64/stablility test/stress FPU with full overclock (45x100).
below is my current CMOS (P8P67 delux b3.v1503)setup
AI TWEAKER
AI Overclock Tuner: X.M.P
BCLK/PEG Frequency:100
Turbo Ratio: By All Cores in op system
By All Cores: 45
Internal PLL: Disabled
Memory Frequency: DDR3-2133
EPU Power Saving: enable
Epu Saving method:auto(auto/Min saving/Medium saving/Max saving)

CPU Power Management
CPU Ratio Auto
Enhanced Speed Step Tech Enabled
Turbo Mode Enabled
Long Duration Power Limit Auto
Long Duration Maintained Auto
Short Duration Power Limit Auto
Additional Turbo Voltage Auto
Primary Plane Current Limit Auto

Load Line Calibration: High
VRM Frequency: auto
Phase Control:Extreme
Duty Control: Extreme
CPU Current Capability100%

CPU Voltage : manual
Vcore: 1.31or 1.32(normally 1.31,actually I don't want to fix voltage over 1.35)
DRAM Volatge: 1.65
VCCSA Voltage: Auto
VCCIO Voltage: Auto
CPU PLL Voltage: Auto
PCH Voltage: Auto
DRAM Data Reference Voltage (CHA A) Auto
DRAM CTRL Reference Voltage (CHA A) Auto
DRAM Data Reference Voltage (CHA B) Auto
DRAM CTRL Reference Voltage (CHA B) Auto
CPU Spread Spectrum Disabled

ADVANCED
CPU Ratio Auto
Intel Adaptive Thermal Monitoring:Enabled
Hyper Threading Enabled
Active Processor Cores All
Limit CPUID Maximum Disabled
Execute Disable Bit Enabled Enabled
Intel Virtualization Technology Disabled
Enhanced Intel Speed Step Tech Enabled
Turbo Mode Enabled
CPU C1E Enabled
CPU C3 Report A Enabled
CPU C6 Report Enabled

sometime system is very satble but not sometimes,especically it often happen freezen
or blue screen whenI am playing sc2/wow,how do I have to increase Vcore over 1.35?
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April 12, 2011 3:51:03 AM

You need to return your CPU to stock speed and buy a real cooler for overclocking. That will allow you to increase the voltage a little bit higher so you don't get blue screens in games. I wouldn't go over 3.7-3.8GHz with the crappy cooler Intel ships with the CPU -- the temps are too high.

Once you get a good cooler, try it with Internal PLL enabled.
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April 12, 2011 5:58:14 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
You need to return your CPU to stock speed and buy a real cooler for overclocking. That will allow you to increase the voltage a little bit higher so you don't get blue screens in games. I wouldn't go over 3.7-3.8GHz with the crappy cooler Intel ships with the CPU -- the temps are too high.

Once you get a good cooler, try it with Internal PLL enabled.



100% agree with this, Intel coolers they ship with the SB's will be safe for about 4.0GHz max and while the SB K-series CPU's are covered under warranty, it's not worth the hassle frying it with the horrible stock cooler. Get a Coolermaster Hyper 212+ and let it rip to 4.5 GHz!
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April 17, 2011 12:20:03 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
The Offset voltage option you have selected is already giving the CPU extra voltage. Basically the board has a "base voltage" value for your CPU. When you enter in an offset of 0.060, you are telling the board to give the CPU the base voltage plus the offset value. The temps will never go down unless you reduce the voltage.

Additional Turbo Voltage is just that ... when the CPU Turbos the cores up to your overclocked speed, the board gives the CPU that extra voltage (beyond what you are already giving it with the offset voltage you have chosen). If the system is Prime95 stable at the full overclocked speed, it doesn't need any extra voltage. Giving it extra will only increase temps further.

Based on the info you have given, I would suggest setting it back to 4.4GHz like you are already thinking. The extra stress on the CPU (evidenced by the higher temps) just isn't worth it.


Sorry, I must not have explained it well.....what I am referring to is what others have reported success with. Once you have reached a stable OC, peeps are reducing offset voltage and making up for it with Additional Turbo Voltage. The why's and wherefore's I didn't quite pick up from the thread.

There's also the LLC to play with ...... note the pattern discovered by one user in the list below:

LLC on REGULAR and Offset @ +0.140 = 1.368v under load (1.088 on idle) PRIME STABLE
LLC on MEDIUM and Offset @ +0.095 = 1.368v under load (1.040 on idle) PRIME STABLE
LLC on HIGH and Offset @ + 0.060 = 1.368v under load (1.000 on idle) PRIME STABLE
LLC on ULTRA HIGH and Offset @ + 0.025 = 1.368v under load (0.982 on idle) - BSOD
LLC on EXTREME and Offset @ - 0.020 = 1.368v under load (INSTANT DEATH)

I'll use the 4.4 for the 24/7/365 profile (the temps of 60C or less fits my goals here) . For the gaming profile, still gonna tweak it a bit ....4.6 GHz gives 62-68C which I'm quite happy with, 4.7 I haven't tried yet but methinks I can keep below 72C. 4.8 GHz I still think is doable .... just need a little more experimentation time.

Been spending my time OC'ing the 560's ..... 1st card went to 1004 Core clock w/o even touching the voltage. Haven't tried the 2nd one yet. Doing them separately as I noticed one running somewhat warmer (80 versus 75 under OCCT GPU test) and making a bit of fan noise when SLI'd.... could be it's position (top card has side fan blowing between, while bottom card has just over an inch to PSU.
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April 17, 2011 12:27:03 PM

rookie1973 said:
really?,I overclocked in 45x100 with manual 1.31 v,the temp was just 42C under leisure status,the temp will high to 90C while it full-work on prime 95,which kind of CPU fan you are using?


Another thought. Many sites have gotten their 2600's to 4.6 on the stock cooler .... look at this site for example:

They have their temps at 64 - 69 at 4.6 Ghz w/ the stock cooler ..... but if ya notice:

http://www.guru3d.com/article/asus-sabertooth-p67-tuf-r...

1 Leave baseclock for what it is right now
2 If optional in the BIOS, increase the TDP limit of your processor to 200 Watts
3 With a 2600K set your base multiplier at 34
4 And now set the per core multiplier at a maximum of your liking, we applied an MP of 46 on all four cores
5 Increase CPU voltage, though setting AUTO might work fine, we applied 1.35V
6 Make sure your processor is properly cooled (we used the stock Intel cooler and forced the fan to 70% RPM)
7 Save and Exit BIOS / UEFI
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April 17, 2011 4:00:23 PM

I still don't believe that's the real stock retail cooler. I won't until they verify it. Intel shipped reviewers a $55 tower cooler that those reviewers then believed was "stock." Other sites have shown it in their reviews.

My 2500K with the real retail stock cooler started hitting high temps way below 4.6GHz, and that's with Gelid GC-Extreme thermal compound and manual voltage control. I don't believe that a 2600K would be cooler than mine unless it's the most efficient one ever.

Edit: And yes, I will continue to point this out in every thread as long as you keep using that as an example for not needing an after-market cooler when overclocking. Using the stock retail cooler when overclocking is not a smart decision, period.
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April 17, 2011 10:01:15 PM

Quote:
My 2500K with the real retail stock cooler started hitting high temps way below 4.6GHz


I was just wondering, was fan speed on auto or did you force fan speed to 70% minimum as they did ?

Quote:
and that's with Gelid GC-Extreme thermal compound


Good choice, in the top 5

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

Quote:
I still don't believe that's the real stock retail cooler. I won't until they verify it. Intel shipped reviewers a $55 tower cooler that those reviewers then believed was "stock." Other sites have shown it in their reviews.


I'm inclined to think you're right ... even the THG review published on February 1st more than 3 weeks after SB was released shows the Intel tower cooler. However, I still gonna disagree w/ your next statement and the relevance to my point :) 

Quote:
Using the stock retail cooler when overclocking is not a smart decision, period.


Your statement impliess that pushing a 2600k to 3.5 Ghz (3.9 w/ Turbo) has a measurable downside? If not, then ya gotta take away the "period". What CPU is more likely, ignoring variables in the manufacturing process, out of the 2 choices below:

1. 2600k on stock cooler at 4.3 Ghz and temp of 70C
2. 2600k on best cooler made at 4.6 Ghz and temp of 71C

It's not the cooler that matters, it's the temperature the CPU runs at.

If peeps are reluctant to invest in a 3rd party cooler, there's no harm in seeing they how far they can go w/ the stock cooler. Not everyone is going to get where they want to go .... not everyone will know where they need to go till after a month or so of running what they wanna run and doing what they wanna do.

TechReaction said it better than me:

http://www.techreaction.net/2011/01/04/3-step-overclock...

Quote:
This [overclocking] guide is independent of your cooling system. Whether you are using the stock Intel cooler or if you’re pushing to the extreme with phase change cooling, the basic steps remain the same.


If one monitors their temps responsibly, there's nothing to be concerned about. If they experience high temps and have chosen quality modern components for their build.....changing a cooler shouldn't take more than 15 or 20 minutes. If I have used the particular cooler before, I can do it in 10.

Prime95 is a good way to test and make sure nothing is ever going to get things hotter than you are comfy with .... but we don't build computers to run Prime95. For example, if a WoW addict build a new machine, overclocks it to 4.4 Ghz, runs a temperature monitoring program and plays WoW for a marathon weekend and finds out that his machine topped out at 65C .... whats the significance if the prime 95 load is 80C if the machine never runs P95 or anything else like it ever again ? Use of "unrealistic synthetic benchmarks" is something Asus refers to in their quote below.

Furthermore, while you or I may want to set our own personal limits to the mid 70's or whatever, we are doing so based upon purely anecdotal or assumptive evidence. We all seem to have gotten comfortable with the GPU limit rising to 100C over the past few years but we still adhere to that ole "low 70's" thing without any SB related evidence to support it.

I have seen nothing published that says SB CPU's will start failing at 75C , 80C or even 95C. Gotta wonder why the BIOS presets for hi temperature shutdown are what they are if 75C is a big concern. Better yet, look at this post written by Juan Jose, an ASUS Technical Marketing Specialist

http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1578110

Quote:
K series overclocking and voltage range recommendations

Quick Note regarding Voltage Scaling – Internal binning of both D1 and D2 parts we discovered consistent voltage scaling patterns.
1. For K series parts, the stock voltage supplied will allow for consistent overclocking generally up to a multiplier of 43x. There is potential for the multi to be raised to 44x depending on the load induced. This default voltage range be approx 1.240 to 1.260 under load.
2. Increased range between 44 to 47x multipliers will generally require a voltage range between 1.30 to 1.375V with an LLC recommended setting of high to ultra high.
3. Increasing the range between 48 to 50x multiplier will generally require a voltage range between 1.40 to 1.500 with a LLC recommended setting of ultra high.
4. Increased range between 50 to 52 (52 generally considered peak max multiplier except for rare 54x parts) will generally require a CPU voltage range between 1.515 to 1.535V with LLC at Ultra High and potential fine adjustments to the CPU skew range.


At this point, I think we can all agree that those kind of voltages are gonna result in temps above 70 no matter what cooler is being used. He goes on to say:

Quote:
Overall a key item to note is the best voltage to OC scaling range potential for the turbo multiplier is 1.400 to 1.425 vcore. Using this voltage range with an LLC recommendation of ultra high will generally provide the best scaling potential with proper load temperatures*. We have generally found exceeding this voltage will not provide additional scaling or will increase load temperatures to a high level with synthetic load applications ( like Prime, Linx, OCCT ). Should you use more realistic loading testing (our recommendation is a combination of AIDA64 stress test, PC Mark Vantage) then temperatures under will be considerably under the max TDP rating.

*cooling recommendation and test performed with CoolerMaster Hyper 212+ with Single Fan, this is the minimum recommendation for multis above 46x. For 50+ multis we recommend a dual fan configuration with this cooler or improved cooling.


Now lets look at a few other bits of info:

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
Thermalright Silver Arrow does 5.4C better than Mehgahalems

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
Megahalems does 7.2C better than Hyper 212

Now it's a given that that 12.6C between what I am using and the 212 isn't scalable but it's a damn big difference. I got 62 - 68 at 4.6 .... adding 13C would put me at 75 - 81. The fact that Asus is saying a 212 w/ single fan is all that's necessary for 4.6 Ghz OC's has me thinking that we're being a lot more conservative on core temps than we really need to be.

I'm gonna re-read that thread and see if Juan has anything to say about core temps.
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April 18, 2011 3:27:05 AM

What do you guys think of the OC tuner function for newbie overclockers like me? I just built a rig with the 2500K cpu and a scythe mugen on my Asus P8p67 Deluxe.

I turned it on and I believe it gives you 4.3 right off the bat.
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