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Do i need to re-seat my heatsink?

Last response: in Overclocking
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January 29, 2011 11:10:55 PM

its a scythe mugen 2, I'm getting a difference of 5-6 degrees between the coolest and hottest core in idle and under load. Is that a big gap meaning incorrect thermal paste application?
Also I'm using the artic silver 5 compound, is there a curing time?

More about : seat heatsink

January 29, 2011 11:46:19 PM

Arctic silver does have a burn in time and it isn't unusual to have a small temp difference between cores. Your idle temps aren't that important compared to temps under load. What kind of temps do you get under loads?
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January 30, 2011 12:00:45 AM

depends on what speed I'm running, at 4.6Ghz the coolest core is at 63 and hottest at 68
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January 30, 2011 12:07:47 AM

That's really high. What CPU are we talkin' and how long ago did you install this heat sink? The Mugen2 is a very highly rated cooler so you should really be lower than that.
I think he burn in tie for arctic silver is pretty quick and only accounts for a few degrees.
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January 30, 2011 12:14:50 AM

its the i5 2500k, what temps would be acceptable?
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January 30, 2011 12:21:44 AM

I'm running an I7-2600K@4.4 and idling at mid 20'sC . Mid 30's under moderate load.
Something is definitely wrong. I'd look at whether you you've put too much of the Arctic Silver paste on the CPU and what the rest of the air flow situation in your case is.
Some things to try:
Download an alternate core temp monitor
See if you can adjust the cpu fan and chasis fan min. rpm in your mobos bios
try re-seating the heatsink on the CPU using the appropriate amount of thermal paste.
Tell us what case you have too and what other air flow you've got going on.
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a c 145 K Overclocking
January 30, 2011 12:29:13 AM

Read this about AS5

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

Quote:
After this article was first published, there was an immediate backlash from some of the manufacturers listed in this review. The primary argument was the lack of cure time. Here is the Arctic Silver 5 recommended cure time instruction from the manufacturers web site:

Due to the unique shape and sizes of the particles in Arctic Silver 5's conductive matrix, it will take a up to 200 hours and several thermal cycles to achieve maximum particle to particle thermal conduction and for the heatsink to CPU interface to reach maximum conductivity. (This period will be longer in a system without a fan on the heatsink or with a low speed fan on the heatsink.) On systems measuring actual internal core temperatures via the CPU's internal diode, the measured temperature will often drop 2C to 5C over this "break-in" period. This break-in will occur during the normal use of the computer as long as the computer is turned off from time to time and the interface is allowed to cool to room temperature. Once the break-in is complete, the computer can be left on if desired.

So by my estimation of this statement it would take almost a year of normal use to properly cure the AC5 compound, or almost nine days of continuous power cycles to meet their recommendation. Benchmark Reviews feels that this is a characteristically unreasonable requirement for any TIM product, and we do not support it. We want products that perform without the burden of sacrifice on our time, especially with some many competing products offering performance without this extra requirement.


I'd reapply with Shin Etsu
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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January 30, 2011 12:33:07 AM

JackNaylorPE said:
Read this about AS5

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

Quote:
After this article was first published, there was an immediate backlash from some of the manufacturers listed in this review. The primary argument was the lack of cure time. Here is the Arctic Silver 5 recommended cure time instruction from the manufacturers web site:

Due to the unique shape and sizes of the particles in Arctic Silver 5's conductive matrix, it will take a up to 200 hours and several thermal cycles to achieve maximum particle to particle thermal conduction and for the heatsink to CPU interface to reach maximum conductivity. (This period will be longer in a system without a fan on the heatsink or with a low speed fan on the heatsink.) On systems measuring actual internal core temperatures via the CPU's internal diode, the measured temperature will often drop 2C to 5C over this "break-in" period. This break-in will occur during the normal use of the computer as long as the computer is turned off from time to time and the interface is allowed to cool to room temperature. Once the break-in is complete, the computer can be left on if desired.

So by my estimation of this statement it would take almost a year of normal use to properly cure the AC5 compound, or almost nine days of continuous power cycles to meet their recommendation. Benchmark Reviews feels that this is a characteristically unreasonable requirement for any TIM product, and we do not support it. We want products that perform without the burden of sacrifice on our time, especially with some many competing products offering performance without this extra requirement.


Wow! Thanks for that. I used Arctic Cooling MX-3 on my Zalman 9900LED. No cure time and non-conductive,
I'd reapply with Shin Etsu
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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January 30, 2011 12:36:03 AM

What would be considered moderate load? I've only been testing either idle or prime 95 blended. What are your temps under full load?

Using Real Temp 3.67, and CPUID hardware monitoring for temps. The CPUID does tend to give readouts 2-3 degrees lower then the real temp.

Its a CM scout case, I believe its a 140mm front intake, 120mm rear exhaust and 120mm top exhaust.
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January 31, 2011 6:10:45 AM

I'm sorry were those temps in the 60's during Prime95? If so, then I wouldn't worry much. I though you meant during normal use.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
January 31, 2011 1:16:22 PM

Seems like you have a staggered temp range...you could either have a mis-seated cooler, or an inconsistent amount of TIM.

However, depending on software you have installed, it could simply mean that other apps are taking advantage of only 1-2 cores while the remaining cores have less application load. Not all apps are multi-threaded and will only take advantage of cores 1/2. Again, it's hard to say.

How much thermal pasted did you apply and how?
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