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Z68

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Last response: in Overclocking
January 31, 2011 9:23:41 AM

when is this chipset expected to be released? (for the 1155 chipset)
has intel made any statements?

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January 31, 2011 12:04:11 PM

ohshaq said:
when is this chipset expected to be released? (for the 1155 chipset)
has intel made any statements?


Likey Q2

But why would you want that? The main difference is it allows you to use the onchip graphics and overclock your cpu. So It's like a H67 and P67 combined except you'll be able to overclock the integrated graphics as well, as if anyone is dying to do that. lol

I really wonder what Intel is thinking with so many chipsets and new sockets coming and going. They really screwed over 1366 buyers, the cost was VERY high and it's pretty much a dead end unless you pay 1K for a i7-970/980X. Now the SB-E cpu's are coming out soon on yet another socket with more chipsets. Crazy.
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January 31, 2011 7:16:18 PM

Now that P67 and H67 have been recalled, you can bet the Z68 will be delayed big time.
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February 1, 2011 2:57:54 AM

i was just reading about that :( 
thx for the info
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February 1, 2011 2:58:25 AM

Best answer selected by ohshaq.
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February 1, 2011 3:47:56 AM

geekapproved said:
Now that P67 and H67 have been recalled, you can bet the Z68 will be delayed big time.

Apparently Z68 wont be delayed
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February 1, 2011 4:17:26 AM

geekapproved said:
Likey Q2

But why would you want that? The main difference is it allows you to use the onchip graphics and overclock your cpu. So It's like a H67 and P67 combined except you'll be able to overclock the integrated graphics as well, as if anyone is dying to do that. lol

I really wonder what Intel is thinking with so many chipsets and new sockets coming and going. They really screwed over 1366 buyers, the cost was VERY high and it's pretty much a dead end unless you pay 1K for a i7-970/980X. Now the SB-E cpu's are coming out soon on yet another socket with more chipsets. Crazy.








Any clue as to how much different or better the SB-E's are supposed to be compared to the current SB's? I heard basically that it will be a more enthusiast built system but that's not supposed to come until Q4.
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February 1, 2011 5:21:17 AM

geekapproved said:
Likey Q2

But why would you want that? The main difference is it allows you to use the onchip graphics and overclock your cpu. So It's like a H67 and P67 combined except you'll be able to overclock the integrated graphics as well, as if anyone is dying to do that. lol

I really wonder what Intel is thinking with so many chipsets and new sockets coming and going. They really screwed over 1366 buyers, the cost was VERY high and it's pretty much a dead end unless you pay 1K for a i7-970/980X. Now the SB-E cpu's are coming out soon on yet another socket with more chipsets. Crazy.


You might need it to enable Quick Sync with a functioning, separate GPU as well. And Quick Sync is a big deal. Intel was showing a system at CES using Lucid software to manage the discrete graphics card while leaving the onboard graphics enabled.
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February 1, 2011 11:53:03 AM



Oh yes it will. Don't believe everything you read. Intel also said the problem only affects 5% of users, however Tom's hardware already confirmed with Manufacturers that it's a whole lot more than that.
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a b V Motherboard
February 3, 2011 1:38:38 AM

Confirmed??? I thought they said the manufactures were expecting more than that. They also know they will probably be replacing significantly more motherboards than the ones affected. I thought Intel said 5% - 15% anyway.
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February 26, 2011 4:52:03 AM

geekapproved said:
Likey Q2

But why would you want that? The main difference is it allows you to use the onchip graphics and overclock your cpu. So It's like a H67 and P67 combined except you'll be able to overclock the integrated graphics as well, as if anyone is dying to do that. lolvI

This is exactly what I'm looking for and actually answers a question I had earlier. I just bought a 2D to 3D video converter program and it utilizes the on board video to assist in speeding up the conversion process. But, considering that the onboard graphics would be disabled when you add a video card, you wouldn't be able to take advantage of this feature. SLI (and CUDA) is also used but only for encoding (whatever that means. I only know that my GTX driver keeps crashing when I use this feature).

I'm willing to bet more programs will use this feature and it would be nice not to have to choose which feature you want to use instead of taking advantage of everything new technology has to offer, if that makes any sense. Since I don't have a SB I can't well say but it would be nice to enable the on board graphics when needed (for video converting, ripping, etc) and still be able to use a dedicated video card.
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February 28, 2011 1:46:45 AM

One thing not mentioned;
SSD Caching
Not much said about it, other than the Z68 will have it. I say, why not get the Z68? Especially considering it won't be long after the re-release of the other 2 that it should be released.
Also, if you're waiting on that, wait out for the Vertex 3 ssd to put in your system, it should be well worth it.
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March 1, 2011 2:09:43 AM

One other thing has come to light. The Z68 chipset will allow Intel's "Quick Sync" to function even if a discrete graphics card is installed. Right now The QS will not function on the 2600K and 2500K chips without 3rd party software solutions like Lucid. It appears that the Z68 with SSD caching and QS functionality that also can be overclocked may be a perfected solution. One wonders if its cost will be competitive with the 2600K chips.
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March 1, 2011 3:05:50 AM

flong said:
One other thing has come to light. The Z68 chipset will allow Intel's "Quick Sync" to function even if a discrete graphics card is installed. Right now The QS will not function on the 2600K and 2500K chips without 3rd party software solutions like Lucid. It appears that the Z68 with SSD caching and QS functionality that also can be overclocked may be a perfected solution. One wonders if its cost will be competitive with the 2600K chips.
Z68 doesn't compete with 2600K, it competes with P67. It will probably come at a small price premium.
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March 1, 2011 7:46:40 AM

Guys please answer the questions i have listed - I know there are a lot of brilliant computer genius's that read Toms Hardware. thanks
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March 1, 2011 8:45:19 AM

flong said:
Guys please answer the questions i have listed - I know there are a lot of brilliant computer genius's that read Toms Hardware. thanks
If your question is whether third-party graphics management software (Lucid) will still be required to operate integrated and discrete graphics simultaneously on the Z68, the answer is yes.
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March 23, 2011 6:22:52 AM

Crashman said:
If your question is whether third-party graphics management software (Lucid) will still be required to operate integrated and discrete graphics simultaneously on the Z68, the answer is yes.


Thanks Crashman, I got this thread confused with another thread where I had several z68 questions listed (it was late when I posted the above response) - I apologize - you did correctly answer the question and explain the Z68 options very well.
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April 6, 2011 12:22:05 AM

Crashman said:
You might need it to enable Quick Sync with a functioning, separate GPU as well. And Quick Sync is a big deal. Intel was showing a system at CES using Lucid software to manage the discrete graphics card while leaving the onboard graphics enabled.



Great answer! I have spent 4 days reading all the Tom's reviews on Sandy Bridge, Virtu software and finally concluded that the only smart way to go is wait for the Z68 chipset so I can get all of the following:
1) Overclocking on my 2600K
2) Virtu software to allow automated smart choice of either discrete GPU OR onboard graphics with Quick Sync, depending on the application being run
3) Direct X 11 support
4) SSD caching
5) anti Aliasing

Am I correct on all that?

When do you anticipate the 6 channel Sandy Bridge will be out? I may want to wait for that too.
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April 6, 2011 12:58:04 AM

slhead said:
Great answer! I have spent 4 days reading all the Tom's reviews on Sandy Bridge, Virtu software and finally concluded that the only smart way to go is wait for the Z68 chipset so I can get all of the following:
1) Overclocking on my 2600K
2) Virtu software to allow automated smart choice of either discrete GPU OR onboard graphics with Quick Sync, depending on the application being run
3) Direct X 11 support
4) SSD caching
5) anti Aliasing

Am I correct on all that?

When do you anticipate the 6 channel Sandy Bridge will be out? I may want to wait for that too.
You mean four channel, as in up to eight memory slots? It's months away still.
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April 6, 2011 1:29:57 AM

Crashman said:
You mean four channel, as in up to eight memory slots? It's months away still.



No I meant that Intel has said the next tick tock for Sandy Bridge with its current 2600 & 2600K having 4 cores & 8 threads is to come out with a six core, 12 thread processor. Just like the 970/980/990 have 6 cores & 12 threads of memory.

I had seen estimates of near the end of this year, but I figured Tom's would be much more informed.

Thanks for your patience with my sloppy terminology.
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April 6, 2011 1:47:37 AM

slhead said:
No I meant that Intel has said the next tick tock for Sandy Bridge with its current 2600 & 2600K having 4 cores & 8 threads is to come out with a six core, 12 thread processor. Just like the 970/980/990 have 6 cores & 12 threads of memory.

I had seen estimates of near the end of this year, but I figured Tom's would be much more informed.

Thanks for your patience with my sloppy terminology.
I don't think Intel has an exact date for it yet :) 
If they had a date, I might not ask: There's a reason for that, and I have an example for you! Intel was showing its Z68 platform at CES, complete with Lucid's software solution to enable both on-die and discrete GPUs. I didn't ask further, and was able to discuss everything I'd seen with readers.

I probably would have been forced to sign an NDA to get more details. I said probably because I didn't actually ask for NDA information. You see, had I signed the NDA, I would not have been able to discuss ANYTHING about what I'd seen with the readers.
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April 6, 2011 4:16:31 AM

Crashman said:
I don't think Intel has an exact date for it yet :) 
If they had a date, I might not ask: There's a reason for that, and I have an example for you! Intel was showing its Z68 platform at CES, complete with Lucid's software solution to enable both on-die and discrete GPUs. I didn't ask further, and was able to discuss everything I'd seen with readers.

I probably would have been forced to sign an NDA to get more details. I said probably because I didn't actually ask for NDA information. You see, had I signed the NDA, I would not have been able to discuss ANYTHING about what I'd seen with the readers.



Very good point on the NDA. Also interesting that they were demo'ing the Z68 with Lucid S/W at about the time that Tom's got a copy of the Z68 to try out with the Virtu S/W. Will be interesting to see what S/W they use for the interface with the onboard & discrete GPUs when they field the production versions.

Thanks for your patience and good explanations!

I have decided to go ahead and order my 2600K with an H67 board and no discrete GPU so I can experiment for myself with my own needs for about 6 months. I need to see if I can get by with onboard graphics only in the video processing applications I run and Photoshop, then maybe try some gaming. That will determine if I need a discrete GPU or not.

By that time the Z68 boards should certainly be firmly out, even if they too need a recall for some reason. The Lucid and or Virtu S/W will have been wrung out by Tom's and others, AND the 6 core, 12 thread Sandy Bridge processor may well be available.

At that point, my computer maker is willing to let me ship it back for an upgrade to the mother board, overclocking of the 2600K (or new processor), SSD cache H/W, maybe with discrete GPU(s), as I see fit!

Does that make sense to you? Or would you just say wait 6 months?
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April 6, 2011 5:39:36 AM

slhead said:
Very good point on the NDA. Also interesting that they were demo'ing the Z68 with Lucid S/W at about the time that Tom's got a copy of the Z68 to try out with the Virtu S/W. Will be interesting to see what S/W they use for the interface with the onboard & discrete GPUs when they field the production versions.

Thanks for your patience and good explanations!

I have decided to go ahead and order my 2600K with an H67 board and no discrete GPU so I can experiment for myself with my own needs for about 6 months. I need to see if I can get by with onboard graphics only in the video processing applications I run and Photoshop, then maybe try some gaming. That will determine if I need a discrete GPU or not.

By that time the Z68 boards should certainly be firmly out, even if they too need a recall for some reason. The Lucid and or Virtu S/W will have been wrung out by Tom's and others, AND the 6 core, 12 thread Sandy Bridge processor may well be available.

At that point, my computer maker is willing to let me ship it back for an upgrade to the mother board, overclocking of the 2600K (or new processor), SSD cache H/W, maybe with discrete GPU(s), as I see fit!

Does that make sense to you? Or would you just say wait 6 months?
H67 makes sense without gaming or overclocking. P67 makes sense without iGPU encoding. If you're building a machine primarily for encoding I'd suggest the H67, but P67 for everyone else.

These processors have amazing overclockability that can be accomplished at voltage levels that are almost universally considered "Safe".
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April 6, 2011 9:27:23 AM

Crashman said:
H67 makes sense without gaming or overclocking. P67 makes sense without iGPU encoding. If you're building a machine primarily I'd suggest the H67, but P67 for everyone else.

These processors have amazing overclockability that can be accomplished at voltage levels that are almost universally considered "Safe".


If i want to build a gaming rig using i5 2500k there is no need to wait for z68, P67 is would be fine, right?
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April 6, 2011 9:34:39 AM

neo700 said:
If i want to build a gaming rig using i5 2500k there is no need to wait for z68, P67 is would be fine, right?
Right, the only thing most users will gain from Z68 is the ability to encode video at twice the speed of their friends' systems.
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April 7, 2011 4:06:47 AM

Crashman said:
Right, the only thing most users will gain from Z68 is the ability to encode video at twice the speed of their friends' systems.




Thanks man
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April 8, 2011 9:30:52 PM

ohshaq said:
when is this chipset expected to be released? (for the 1155 chipset)
has intel made any statements?


Ohshaq, if the below source is correct, looks like it'll be May 8th, 2011!!!

www.nordichardware.se/nyheter/69-cpustyrkrets/42845-intel-z68-styrkretsen-lanseras-den-8-maj-med-aggressiv-prissaettning.html

translation:http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http://www.nordichardware.se/nyheter/69-cpustyrkrets/42845-intel-z68-styrkretsen-lanseras-den-8-maj-med-aggressiv-prissaettning.html

News of good pricing and lots of enthusiast options, and this is all good news! 1 month...! :bounce:  :pt1cable:  :cry:  :love:  :bounce: 
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April 9, 2011 12:12:19 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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