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Need step by step instructions for new c drive

Last response: in Windows XP
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September 27, 2011 5:40:57 PM

Thanks for reading this and hopefully getting some help. I am not the brightest bulb in the pack so really need step by step instructions for my problem.
My C drive is about to die. I keep getting write errors on it. I would like to buy a new c drive and put the stuff on my old c drive to the new one.
How do I do this? How do I name my new drive c when my old drive is already c? How do I move all the stuff over? So many questions and not even a clue!!

Thanks so much,
Dianne
September 27, 2011 6:25:27 PM

Hi Dianne, [:tigsounds:4]

I can give you easy to do instructions but it's not just going to be a click and you're done thing.

I have a program stored at another website that makes your job very easy. It's an "ISO" file that will need to be downloaded and burned to CD using a CD burner program that can make an ISO file back into the original disk. I'll provide a link to get one for free if you don't have one of those programs in your computer yet.

What you'll be doing, if you go with my method...

Download the ISO file, burn to CD.
Connect your new drive to the computer (hopefully you have a way of doing that).
(Both drives will need to be connected to the computer at the same time).
You'll CD boot the computer using the disk you made.
The program will load...
Initially, if your new drive has never been initialized, it will detect that condition and offer to partition and format it. Cancel that offer and proceed to the main menu buttons. It will partition and format later.
It will have "buttons" to click to setup the new drive and copy everything from your present drive to the new drive.
When completed, you'll remove your old drive and plug the new one in it's place and be done.

Sounds easy enough? There are a few things to be very careful about, such as to be sure you click the proper "source" drive and "destination" drive. It will warn you if it sees an operating system on the destination drive but don't ever really trust that a warning will appear, it's best to know for yourself that you have made the correct choices. When the program is asking for source and destination drives, your present dive will have it's name showing, which helps to prevent an error. The choice is made by clicking the little plus (+) sign under the drive description and that line will become highlighted... you'll see.

There will be a checkbox to indicate your new drive will be the new boot drive and this checkbox needs to be checked. This tells the program that you are cloning a drive to a new one and it pretty much knows what to do after you indicate the source and destination drives.

The name of the ISO file is "Hitachi" and you can download it after a modest wait-delay (since it's on a free server) by clicking
HERE

If you have Nero Burning ROM or another suitable program to burn an ISO file back to normal, then use what you are comfortable with. If you don't have such a program you can download and install one free by clicking HERE. This website explains in detail what and ISO image file is, just for you own curiosity.

You can come back to this thread and ask any questions you may have at any time. I don't live in front of this computer screen, but I do check in rather often. So if there is a question, do come back. We (it's just me at the moment, but all of us here) want to give the best help you could ever ask for, anywhere.



Edit: Almost forgot to send flowers!
September 27, 2011 6:40:18 PM

OMG!! Thank you so much. Not only a quick reply, but, I think I actually understand!!
I'm ordering the HD today and as soon as I get it I will start your process. I have a laptop that I will use in case of an emergency to you....
I am SO excited!
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September 27, 2011 7:05:06 PM



If you can't physically attach both drives to your computer at the same time, (not many laptops permit more than one drive at a time to be connected) I suggest an inexpensive USB drive adapter that will allow you connect just about any type drive externally to any computer to make this process possible and easy.

Here's one at NewEgg for $19.95
Here's the same thing at TigerDirect for $16.99

Some people have a preference of where they get their equipment.
September 29, 2011 1:59:07 PM

Thanks for the info but now I need more!!!! Is it the new drive that I attach "outside"? And then just swap drives when I'm done putting everything on the new drive?

Also, what should I get for a drive? What kind? How big? A Sata - seems to be all I see in ads? My computer runs extremely hot.

It's an Alienware (old though) with 3591 mhz, it's a dual processor with 4 gb Ram (can't go any higher than that - anything I can do about that?), windows xp, sp3

My bios is ancient - I'd like to upgrade that - is it possible?

If I've been to pushy trying to get answers please accept my apology. I am just SO GRATEFUL for your help.

Dianne
September 29, 2011 4:17:54 PM

otieatkins said:
Thanks for the info but now I need more!!!! Is it the new drive that I attach "outside"? And then just swap drives when I'm done putting everything on the new drive?

<snip>
Dianne


Sounds like a tower type computer. (My big assumption here, you didn't specify) If so, good, will probably have more available drive sockets on the mainboard so you might not need the external drive adapter. More on this below...

Quote:
Also, what should I get for a drive? What kind? How big? A Sata - seems to be all I see in ads? My computer runs extremely hot.

Take the cover off the machine. Look at the hard drive you already have. It should have 2 cables going to it. One is the power and goes to a flat looking plug with 4 wires at the drive. The other will be a small flat ribbon-looking cable (about 1/2 " wide) with a small plug that can be just about any color these days. If you see this then you have SATA.

If you see a wide 80 wire flat ribbon cable (about 2" wide) (or sometimes 80 wires bundled in a common tube, but still using about a 2" plug) going to the drive instead of the small ribbon cable, then it's PATA (AKA; Parallel, or standrad IDE). These haven't been used for a few years, but since you say it's really old, best to check which type you have. I'll bet you have SATA.

As far as your question of how big??? Get a 2 TB. Hard drives used to be quite expensive but any more, a 2TB cost about the same as a 500GB so price is just not a factor anymore, go for the big one, get 2TB. You may see things like "SATA II" or "SATA III" or other specifications for newer super-fast SATA drives. Don't waste extra money on anything faster than "SATA II" for that mainboard. I like Seagate drives, but it's really like Ford's and Chevy's these days, all the major brands do pretty well and pretty much the same.

While you are looking in the computer... The hard drive data cable plugs into a socket at the mainboard. Look for any extra, un-used (open) sockets adjacent to the one being used for the drive you already have. It is very rare to only have one socket on a SATA type board. If it is PATA type then there may only be the one large socket but a 2-drive cable may be able to be used if this ends up being what you have.

Runs hot? Dust is a killer. Get a can of air-blast (my generic term) and blow out the dust. Never use a vacuum cleaner.

Quote:
It's an Alienware (old though) with 3591 mhz, it's a dual processor with 4 gb Ram (can't go any higher than that - anything I can do about that?), windows xp, sp3
That's not a slug. You have a decently fast machine.
Quote:
My bios is ancient - I'd like to upgrade that - is it possible?
Never "upgrade" or re-flash a BIOS unless there is a specific reason for doing so. A BIOS upgrade is only done when a problem is discovered that can only be remedied by a new version.

Quote:
If I've been to pushy trying to get answers please accept my apology. I am just SO GRATEFUL for your help.
Pushy? Heaves no! I (we) love it when we get such details from someone. You just can't count how many times someone comes here and says "my computer won't work how do I fix it?" or just "hello" and from that we are supposed to diagnose and offer a fix. Not much of a clue eh? You are doing great. Questions and details lets us understand what you have and what can then be done to best make it all work.




Edit:
Quote:
And then just swap drives when I'm done putting everything on the new drive?

Yes. After you clone your present drive, you will unplug it, remove it, and install the new one in the computer, plugging in the data cable to the same socket your present drives uses. Your data is just "moving into a newer, bigger house." While you are doing the cloning operation, the new drive just sort of sits there all plugged in, sitting on the table next to your computer until the process is completed.
October 2, 2011 4:00:30 PM

I have the info on my hard drive although I have not opened case to look yet. This is the info that came with the computer and I never changed it.

BARRACUDA 160GB 8MB CACHE SERIAL ATA WITH NCQ HD

Is this a SATA? What's NCO?

Can I ask you another question? For the last day or so all of a sudden all my icons and task bar stuff will disappear and then come back. Does this sound like my HD or a virus?

Thanks....
October 2, 2011 4:04:23 PM

Oops, a little more...

I keep seeing OEM on drive ads - what is that? And what is the real difference between 5900 rpm and 7900 rpm? Which do I want or does it really matter?

And, some have 3 or 6 Gpbs beside the descriptions - what is that - something I care about?

And, do I want 32mb or 64mb?

Glory, glory you're a patient person!!!!
October 3, 2011 6:51:11 AM



Quote:
BARRACUDA 160GB 8MB CACHE SERIAL ATA WITH NCQ HD
Is this a SATA? What's NCO?
Yes, that is SATA. NCQ is Native Command Queuing. Nice but not necessary. It's just a feature the drive has, others have their own bells and whistles too.

Quote:
And, do I want 32mb or 64mb?
Bigger is usually better. 32mb is still very large. 64MB is more expensive and you may never notice the difference. That is the cache, a temporary holding pool of data anticipated to be requested by the computer. It is super-fast because it is data already retrieved from the drive discs and held in this temporary memory for near-instant access. Your original drive is only 8MB.

Quote:
I keep seeing OEM on drive ads - what is that?
Left over "Original Equipment Manufacturers" drives. Nothing really wrong or bad about them. They don't come in a shiny box (that you'll throw away anyhow).
Quote:
And what is the real difference between 5900 rpm and 7900 rpm? Which do I want or does it really matter?
The 7200 rpm drives deliver quicker than the 5400 rpm drives. This is not so noticeable on very large files, but the every-day use is quite noticeable. You'll be somewhat disappointed if you gt a 5400 rpm drive. They have a lag-time that gets annoying.
Quote:
And, some have 3 or 6 Gpbs beside the descriptions - what is that - something I care about?
You will care only in so much that the 6 Gbps drives cost more due to the data transfer rate. Your machine won't go 6 Gbps. Not worth paying more for them. Your drive is a 3Gbps drive and so you should buy one that has that data rate. Most SATA II drives are 3Gbps.
Quote:
Can I ask you another question? For the last day or so all of a sudden all my icons and task bar stuff will disappear and then come back. Does this sound like my HD or a virus?
That depends.. How long are they gone? If only a flicker, maybe nothing. Gone all day is not good. Some programs will take a snap-shot of the screen and restore it after doing their thing. This restore can make it flicker.
Quote:
you're a patient person!!!!
You haven't seen me in the morning waiting for my coffee to finish. :fou: 
!