Oil Submerged Cooling

Meaning for this to be a discussion...but when and will submersion based cooling ever become mainstream? I remember back in the day when liquid was new, just came out. Expensive as hell and still is (to me it's just chunks of metal like something I can get from my car and only scrap for less than $1). Never did truly become mainstream in terms such as air. Air is affordable, everywhere, etc.

I mean I would love to go to a water cooled system, just no money nor time to learn it at the moment. Does oil submerged cooling sound like another failed attempt of "to-be" mainstream cooling? www.hardcorepc.com (I think it's the right site) patented such a design recently and is building them and is so far off to a good start, just can't put any motherboard in it personally. DangerDen(?) has also been doing similar things with plexiglas boxes and filling them with oil based solutions, but theirs doesn't seem as nice or convenient.

Or is this something to expect 50 years from now being mainstream? By then I would imagine we'd just be able to put a refrigerator radiator into the case to cool it :lol:
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More about submerged cooling
  1. The problem with oil submersion with PCB is that it permanently soaks the board. This isn't necessarily bad for the user that expects this, but it causes the resale of these components to vanish, the end-user maintenance becomes and issue and transportation of a case full of oil is a hazard outside of Joe Bob using his car to move it.

    Mainstream...no. Enthusiast...experimental...yes.

    I've watercooled for 8+ years. I've NEVER remotely considered oil submersion cooling...far too many cons vs. pros. If you want, go for it...there are a lot of people who have done it...but most vow to never go back. Watercooling is a whole other game...and addiction if you will.

    Quote:
    Or is this something to expect 50 years from now being mainstream? By then I would imagine we'd just be able to put a refrigerator radiator into the case to cool it


    This has also been tried...as well as a PC in a fridge. The compressors are NO WHERE near powerful enough to remove the heat watts being constantly produced. Fridges work on the principle that it cools stuff down to a low temps...and then only has to maintain. They don't continue to produce heat.

    PC's on the other hand, continue to pump out heat as long as they are running.
  2. oil will eventually heat up with no way of cooling it
  3. ^Right. Most submerged oil rigs run a pump/rad at minimum to circulate the tank because the oil itself is too viscous to flow and disperse heat well enough.
  4. Yea makes lots of sense. Still would be nice if liquid would come down in price. I know tons of people who want to give it a go, but just don't have $600 to spend.

    Still curious what the next possible mainstream cooling solution would be. Possibly liquid if it comes down in price which I can see.
  5. You can get into watercooling cheaper if you look around and know what you want to get started with.

    What is your budget? What do you want to cool? What are your long-term plans?
  6. Well I started to look @ a few of the guides you've posted in your signature and to my luck a lot of parts, good ones too (i.e. the 3 fan radiators) are on sale. But I'm thinking of it in the way if I get it now I can use it in future builds. Only downside will be a new CPU Block and GPU block though. Better than a whole new water set :na: On a side note though, copper is the best when it comes to pressure/heat absorption/dissipation correct? Or is it acetyl? I know its one of those few. Gold doesn't seem necessary (I could be wrong), not like there's any electricity involved. Saw the EK CPU Gold covered water block. Does look sexy though lol
  7. Gold is far too expensive (and too soft?) for large scale use. Most gold plating is just a layer of nano-particles over the contact point. Can't make a comment on how the gold EK block is applied.

    Acetyl and acrylic are used only as backings or caps, not for heat transfer. They are cheaper to shape than copper/nickle/brass, also much lighter.
  8. Copper is what the blocks are made of...acetal is just the top.

    CPU blocks can be reused, and usually have new brackets that support the newest chips. It just depends, but usually this is the case.

    GPU blocks are either specific, full-cover blocks that can only be used on one card, or universal and follow similarly to the CPU blocks...bracket swap.

    Radiators...you can keep these as long as you like...until you find something you like better. Same with a pump. Reservoir...same again.

    Typically, the initial investment is where it seems high. After that (if you've selected quality gear to begin with) it's a matter of adding/upgrading as you want.
  9. Yeah I thought there was something weird about a gold/gold plated block. And yea I forgot about the brackets which you can just buy new ones. I just have to make my mind on if I should get a new case (thinking of HAF X) so I can fit in the watercooling or use my current Antec 902 and get an external Koolance unit. I might just get the HAF considering I can probably use it for years to come due to its size and cooling quality.
  10. I don't think it ever will .... look at Sandy Bridge .... when ya can get 4.5 - 4.6 with the stick intel cooler and just a bit beyond that with the best air coolers, the return on investment in both time and money on even water cooling is getting smaller and smaller. Where almost at the point where the electronics themselves rather than heat will be the limiting factor.
  11. JackNaylorPE said:
    I don't think it ever will .... look at Sandy Bridge .... when ya can get 4.5 - 4.6 with the stick intel cooler and just a bit beyond that with the best air coolers, the return on investment in both time and money on even water cooling is getting smaller and smaller. Where almost at the point where the electronics themselves rather than heat will be the limiting factor.


    I would disagree with your assumption..water cooling is nowhere near being death ,as long as you can push this new chips
    like Sandy witch is capable of 5.0+ and new enthusiast chips coming in near future (32nm,22nm all can pull 1.5~1.65V) you will always want better cooling,5.0Ghz today is like 4.0 two months ago
    Got my SB under water @5.1 and temps are @69C under full stress ,can you get that with air?
  12. It's all about personal preference, what you want to spend, and what is important to you.

    Watercooling performs great. Yes, it is costly; especially to start-up. Does it look cool? Absolutely. Do you need it? No. Do you want it? Perhaps.
  13. I would imagine water cooling is gonna stick around for quite awhile. But I'm sure the nesxt big method of cooling years from now might be submersion, obviously with tweaks to fix its few or plentiful issues.

    And one of the primary reasons I want to do water cooling is because it does look cool lol All the UV tubes, etc. Not doing it solely for that.

    ortoklaz said:
    I would disagree with your assumption..water cooling is nowhere near being death ,as long as you can push this new chips
    like Sandy witch is capable of 5.0+ and new enthusiast chips coming in near future (32nm,22nm all can pull 1.5~1.65V) you will always want better cooling,5.0Ghz today is like 4.0 two months ago
    Got my SB under water @5.1 and temps are @69C under full stress ,can you get that with air?


    Do you mean your NB? My SB barely, if at all, hits 40C and its a mosfet heatsink covering the NB as well. My NB I especially do want to cool down more since it hits 50'ish C or more under load.
  14. No, I think he meant SB = Sandy Bridge.

    But yes, typically NB = northbridge, SB = southbridge. Northbridge isn't really necessary to watercool, but more viable than your southbridge. Both are designed to run much hotter than your CPU, so temps shouldn't be as much an issue.

    For a pro/high amateur overclocker pushing the very limit of OC'ing their gear, I'd say go for it...you'll benefit from the lower temps when thermal limits are the only limits left. For Joe User, not necessary...but does look neat.
  15. sorry and yes Sandy Bridge
    lets not forget liquid cooling is little bit more than just better cooling
  16. Yes.

    It's smexy case bling.
  17. http://www.frozencpu.com Check out the xspc water loop its not bad for 130. I have been using it for a few month =and have had no problems with it. I know you can spend 600 on a loop but why should you. I had people blasting the T.T 850i loop I used on my old e8400 people say it is a piece of crap but I used it for 3 years and had no problems with it running my 8400@4.2 GHZ and with good temp. I think if you want to buy into people telling you aww get dangerden or some other top of the line loop has more money then sense. This is just my opinion and are not trying to offend.
  18. I know 2 people personally that had failed+leaking pumps from TT kits. That is why I say what I do about TT Bigwater.
  19. christop said:
    I know you can spend 600 on a loop but why should you.


    Where does this value keep coming from? When cooling 2 GPUs, a CPU and buying a new case in one go I didn't spend that much.
  20. ^I agree.

    And no one should question what someone else wants to spend on their hobby...just because 'YOU' wouldn't spend that, doesn't mean someone else doesn't have the ability to and wants to. Yeah, you can spend $600 on a loop, easily. Why should you? Because you want to and it's something personally important or enjoyable to you.

    You can build a CPU+2 GPU loop for a cost in the neighborhood of $300-$350 if you really get frugal.
  21. Yep. I just can't decide on a new case with it built in-new case with internal system-external unit with current case. I'll probably sit on it for a month lol

    But part wise I think I'm leaning towards Swifteck, Koolance (if I go external) or EK and Bitspower. Can't remember all the brands, but these seem to be more reputable if you know what I mean (correct me if I'm wrong).

    Just would be nice if a $1000 would magically appear on my doorstep at a time like this.
  22. Waiting a moth is a good idea to plan things out. Due to budget restraints I fiddled with ideas for almost a year and still made a few mistakes. Though at least they were not the kind that involved more money.

    My system is almost entirely Swiftech parts because there just happened to be a store nearby me running their stock out. The offer some of the best bang-for-buck radiators for people living in the USA.

    I also have some rotary connections from Bitspower, they do what they should... not much more to say. (I like their logo?)
  23. I think I'm gonna go with a new case (HAF X or Corsair 800D, I have to look into the HAF X more though). Considering I'll be able to use the Corsair for god knows how long, due to its size, same with the HAF X if its a similar build which I think it is off the top of my head but dunno. And yea I am going to take this step by step. Case first, then reservoir (<thank god these are cheaper)/pump/radiator or blocks/barbs/accessories and then tubes.

    When it comes to clamps, yea they get the job done, but is it rare for a leak to occur using those vs compression fittings? Since I'll have to clean it then and now I don't feel like tearing up my hands with compression fittings if clamps do the job just fine.
  24. I know for me having a Microcenter nearby was a blessing because I could drive over and scope out the size and positioning of everything before purchase. The guys there had no qualms with me sticking my head inside the display cases to get a better sense of the dimensions. Though I bet I looked pretty goofy to the "normal" customers.

    I've only used a pair of compression fittings so far with no leak issues. What seems to be the biggest problem with them is people over-tightening using tools over fingers. They tend to be more expensive, but they look darned nice in my opinion.

    Otherwise barbs and clamps have also been worry free. I've used plastic and Home Depot metal ones. I actually quite prefer the metal ones, though that's more personal taste than any functional advantage. Though you have to have longer barbs for most of the metal clamps sold at my local store.

    If you don't rush the actual building the odds of a leak are fairly low. My only leak on my first build was on my GPU block, a MCW60. (An annoying block to get clamps on when using 1/2" tubing) I found it during the leak check, so I fixed it and no damage was done. Properly connected lines won't spontaneously blow out when hooked up properly.

    If you want to burly up your fingers it's time to bust out the K'nex and start marathon building!
  25. Personally I prefer Lego's. Lego's were big in my school compared to K'nex so K'nex were like the cheap lego's xD

    I'm thinking about going with compressions around the pump area and clamps everywhere else. And yea, I do prefer metal over the plastic, it just seems much more sturdy and seems like it can withstand more force. It seems better to get the HAF X over the Corsair 800D too. The Corsair has poor air cooling form the looks of it and I want to move into my new case right when I get it then add the water parts in when I get them. Also is a $100 less for basically the same case.
  26. I'd make sure you give yourself plenty of time to research into exactly what you want. The last thing you want is to make a snap decision on a cheap piece of junk (read: H50 or Larkooler...or worse...Thermaltake Bigwater) and then find out you wasted your money on a cooler that performs poorly and is highly prone to leaks and failures.

    Also, you'll want to give yourself time to plan out how much heat needs to be dissipated (wattage calculator:http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp This is for PSU's, but you can get some decent rough estimates for CPUs and GPUs with it.

    They also have a loop flow designer, but it's not a huge deal what your loop order is. But, it's fun to play with: http://www.extreme.outervision.com/flowdesigner.jsp

    Read, read, read and carefully plan your design. Trust me on this...the more you know as you purchase your hardware, the better the end-result will be.
  27. Yep I've used the PSU Calculator awhile ago for building this rig for a quick estimate. However, heavily overclocked I barely hit 420w on full load and it gave me 575w+ on 90% load when I know I got the right fans, hard drives, etc. set. I'm using a 650w Antec TruePower so I think that should do. Again, getting the stuff over time (months time or more perhaps).

    What I'm planning on getting so far after a handful days of looking and reading is:
    Swiftech MCP655 (Something about the MCP350 with a replaced top can match it? Haven't looked @ price of pump tops for MCP350)
    EK Dual Bay SPIN (I mostly like the way it looks and extra inlets/outlets for plug LEDs :wahoo: )
    Black Ice GTX420 Radiator and one of its little brothers for in between.
    EK-Supreme HF Full Nickel REV.2 or Swiftech Apogee XT (Can't Decide, heard very good things about both)
    EK-FC580 GTX - Acetal / Nickel Full Coverage Water Block (Still unsure as I just looked around 30min for GPU blocks. I want a block where the nickel is viewable, trying to get a silver water setup to contrast with the black case and full coverage. Danger Den is so damn expensive for GPU blocks. I found an exact BitsPower one I was looking for but didn't hear good things about it.)
    Gonna get a few swivel/normal 40/90 degree barbs for the tighter turns. Maybe a few compressions for the pump area where there is a lot of pressure/force due to the pump. Tubes I'll look at later.
    Gonna look later for Northbridge/Southbridge water block (yea I want it ;)).

    I already got a few ideas for the loop. Starting from Reservoir --> Pump --> Radiator --> CPU --> (Small radiator when I decide on which one. I might look for anotehr Black Ice one with two inlets so I can do a 'Y' from 1. CPU to NB waterblock 2. Direct to small radiator. Sounds worthless splitting it in a Y?) --> GPU --> Reservoir. Gonna start loop from bottom of reservoir as heat rises (at least they've said that in school for all these years lol)

    Thanks guys so far for sticking by with me :ange:

    EDIT: Looked @ SkineeLabs stuff, the AC AquagraFX for GTX480 looks very promising. The BitsPower did horrible! Continuning on reading the other stuff too................
  28. Those BIX rads are high FPI (fins per inch) and require high CFM fans to get the most out of. Just FYI...

    Try looking into these below:

    XSPC's...............http://www.jab-tech.com/XSPC-c-326.html
    Thermochill's......http://www.jab-tech.com/Thermochill-c-260.html
    Swiftech's..........http://www.jab-tech.com/Swiftech-c-263.html (I run dual MCR320's, for instance)

    The 355 + top is a good choice, but so is the 655 (I run a 655). Both are great choices. The 350 is very similar to the 355, but the 350 is a little noisier. Both perform close to the same. MCP35x is the same size as the 350/355, but more powerful than all the pumps listed above. However, it comes at a higher price. It does have the ability to run PWM from your CPU cooler 3-pin if you prefer. Any of these pumps would perform excellent; just figure out what is the best choice for you. Tops for the 350/355/35x are all the same, since they use the same base and footprint. The internals and PCB are different.

    As for the PSU calculator, if you go through and set everything to minimal and only putting in your actual CPU+ overclock and your GPUs + overclock...leaving the rest of the options at minimum, you would get a decent estimate of the heat output in watts by your CPU and GPUs if you are to watercool them. Add in a handful of watts for the pump, but usually negligible.

    Why the res with the spinners? They aren't 24"s and chrome, you know this right?
  29. Yep I was gonna buy a bunch of fans for a push/pull for all the radiators, was gonna look in the top tier for the high performance fans. I already have that newer Zalman LCD Power Load/Fan Controller, so either using that or the mobo's (many) fan pin areas.

    For the calculator, I went and set it to 50% System utilization and it gave me the readings I'm always getting. So I'm sure I'm gonna have more than enough power (thinking the radiators with the fans and everything will be under 100w).

    When it comes to the reservoir, I just want a drive bay one I can also see and put in LEDs (I think I saw a total of 4 holes in the picture, probably 1 on the bottom meaning 3 are misc.) Took me a bit to realize your joke about the spinners, I'm tired lol

    I want something to show the flow, but now that I'm thinking about it, the spiiner in the res won't show the flow good vs one that is hooked up to the tubing. I might get it anyways because I just really like it lol

    The one main question I have now is, looking at the benchmarks for hte CPU coolers, what are the differences between the EK Supreme HF PT1, 2, (no #). The PT being plate I think, an accessory? Is it simply the revision?

    Then some sexy blue cathodes and blue LED fans for the HAF X over the red ones and I'm set. I'd love to ave the red, keyboard and mouse are blue...
  30. Ahhh...well in that case (for the rads) you seem set for BIX's.

    I know people want the spinner to help them feel better about their loop running, but honestly, it's highly doubtful you'll ever encounter issues. You can (and should) run temp monitoring software and it can be configured to set off an audible alarm and shut down the OS if your CPU temps reach a threshold that you determine...say, 70C, just to be safe. Watercooling should never let your CPU reach this temp, if it's setup correctly, and it still falls below most CPU heat thresholds for AMD and Intel. Remember, everything you add to your loop causes restriction, and flow rate meters are no exception. They likely won't make a huge hit on flows, but it's up to you.

    Which benchmarks are you referring to with the EK's? Wondering if they could be jets/inserts for the block.
  31. I use an MCP355 with the XSPC Restop and am very happy with it. It pushes through 3 blocks, 3 rads and too much tubing without any issue. The Restop comes with a pair of LED indents and a blue LED to go with it. Getting air out though it takes longer than average though. Once the air is out it's silent.

    I think the CPU block being referred to comes with interchangeable injection plates.

    The trouble with splitting the lines is that different blocks impose different flow restrictions. The block with the higher restriction will see unusually low flow rates and reduce the cooling efficiency. I would stick with a non-branching loop for simplicity's sake.
  32. rubix_1011 said:
    Ahhh...well in that case (for the rads) you seem set for BIX's.

    I know people want the spinner to help them feel better about their loop running, but honestly, it's highly doubtful you'll ever encounter issues. You can (and should) run temp monitoring software and it can be configured to set off an audible alarm and shut down the OS if your CPU temps reach a threshold that you determine...say, 70C, just to be safe. Watercooling should never let your CPU reach this temp, if it's setup correctly, and it still falls below most CPU heat thresholds for AMD and Intel. Remember, everything you add to your loop causes restriction, and flow rate meters are no exception. They likely won't make a huge hit on flows, but it's up to you.

    Which benchmarks are you referring to with the EK's? Wondering if they could be jets/inserts for the block.

    Thanks to ASUS I have all the Temp. and speed monitoring stuff I need. Can control them from the board and the Zalman fan controller (can't remember the model). The benches I was refering to is http://skinneelabs.com/ek-supreme-hf/4/ >SkinneeLabs. At this point I know I'm either getting one of the EK Supreme HF's or the Apogee XT.

    Anonymous said:
    I use an MCP355 with the XSPC Restop and am very happy with it. It pushes through 3 blocks, 3 rads and too much tubing without any issue. The Restop comes with a pair of LED indents and a blue LED to go with it. Getting air out though it takes longer than average though. Once the air is out it's silent.

    I think the CPU block being referred to comes with interchangeable injection plates.

    The trouble with splitting the lines is that different blocks impose different flow restrictions. The block with the higher restriction will see unusually low flow rates and reduce the cooling efficiency. I would stick with a non-branching loop for simplicity's sake.

    I was stuck between 1 of the few pumps but I'll go with the MCP655. A bit of future-proofing I must admit as I really want to do SLI/Crossfire, but who knows if I ever can. I did also think that splitting the line as I suggested might just be a waste of time so at this point I think I'll run it from the CPU to the NB/SB to the little radiator and then to the GPU. I'll have to look for those interchangeable plates now because the results do seem rather promising if that's the case :bounce:. At least now I know what I'm paying for, stuff that won't just crap out on me with a name brand behind it :D
  33. ASUS Probe software is notorious for being inaccurate. I'd stick with RealTemp or CoreTemp instead.

    Also, don't split to parallel; keep everything a serial loop.

    MCP355 would work just as well, it's very powerful and actually has more head pressure than the MCP655 with stock tops (head pressure is the most crucial in most loops).

    BTW: I think your CPU block question is due to the newer version of the EK block vs. the older one. They discuss the newer microchannels being milled a little deeper, and the difference of the injector plate.
  34. rubix_1011 said:
    ASUS Probe software is notorious for being inaccurate. I'd stick with RealTemp or CoreTemp instead.

    Also, don't split to parallel; keep everything a serial loop.

    MCP355 would work just as well, it's very powerful and actually has more head pressure than the MCP655 with stock tops (head pressure is the most crucial in most loops).

    BTW: I think your CPU block question is due to the newer version of the EK block vs. the older one. They discuss the newer microchannels being milled a little deeper, and the difference of the injector plate.


    355 is good pump but not reliable as D5 and you need good top for it in order to have it running without any problems and as for head pressure it is true if you comparing 355 to 655 vario but 655S is a lot stronger

    @OP when shopping for CPU block make sure the one you get won't interface with the caps on your motherboard (some new MB's have them too close to the socket )
    http://img89.imageshack.us/img89/3820/capsvg.jpg

    Uploaded with ImageShack.us
  35. Flow rates are higher with the 655, but actual head pressure is higher on the 355. To be perfectly honest, either is an excellent pump choice...and if you add the top to the 355, its incredibly powerful for the small footprint.

    Or, simply go with the newer MCP35x and add a DDC top of your choice for the best performance over 355/655's.
  36. Most D5's are the 12v variety; the 24v types aren't as common. To be honest, I thought they only went up to 18v; didn't know they moved into a 24v option...? But your midline of the graph shows the D5 and DDC with almost identical curves...which are the 2 most common versions of those pumps....both being 12v.
  37. Yep it's not that much difference at all,D5 is better choice in my opinion and cheaper
  38. I'll admit...I love the D5 vario. That damn thing is a beast.
  39. ortoklaz said:
    355 is good pump but not reliable as D5 and you need good top for it in order to have it running without any problems and as for head pressure it is true if you comparing 355 to 655 vario but 655S is a lot stronger

    @OP when shopping for CPU block make sure the one you get won't interface with the caps on your motherboard (some new MB's have them too close to the socket )

    Cap and choke wise I think I have enough clearance. The AM3 stock fan bracket/cooler itself does extend rather far which I noticed awhile ago


    I do have the Zalman ZM-MFC3 for temperature monitoring. PC Probe I have heard it does give rather inaccurate readings. I use it just to get a 'gist' of the temperatures currently being kicked out.

    rubix_1011 said:
    Flow rates are higher with the 655, but actual head pressure is higher on the 355. To be perfectly honest, either is an excellent pump choice...and if you add the top to the 355, its incredibly powerful for the small footprint.

    Or, simply go with the newer MCP35x and add a DDC top of your choice for the best performance over 355/655's.

    Pump wise I think I'll stick with the MCP655. Slightly cheaper, very similar in terms of how it does with the MCP35X (didn't realize it was a newer model) and saves me a bit of cash. And both the MCP350/5 and MCP655 have one thing better than the other. The one thing I can't see with the MCP655 does it come with a DC/PWM wiring setup so I can say...connect it to my board or fan controller to adjust it's speed? Because if not I might just get the speed control variant, unless the non-speed control variant always runs it @ top speed which I would probably do anyways.
  40. My understanding is the MCP35x is the only Laing pump that has the PWM option. I am not aware of any D5/MCP655 variant that does. The D5 vario has the speed control, but it is a simple dial adjustment on the back of the pump.
  41. Yep as long as you have this MB you fine ,but you may want to upgrade so take this into consideration
  42. Yes, the MCP35x has PWM. The most the earlier models have is a Tach line.

    I think some non-speed control D5/MCP655 advertise as running about 3/5 compared to top speed.

    ortoklaz: You decided on an avatar yet!? I swear it's different every time I pop over to this thread.
  43. I know for a fact that my D-tek v2 follows the stock Intel cooler dimensions almost exactly without any excess out the sides. Meaning: it stays within the lines on the motherboard. :)

    I think I've read that the D5 non-vario is actually 4/5 on the vario speed control. This coming from Skinnee.

    ...And yeah...what's with the revolving door of avatars?
  44. Alrighty-then then 4/5 it is. Good thing I say "think."

    ahhhhhh.... 3/5 is probably coming from my brain thinking 350 on the oven. I've been working on a Valentines treat :)
  45. I just always remember reading that when you compare the D5 vario/non-vario, the vario 'can get turned to 11'. But in all honesty, I'm almost positive that Skinnee and Martin both addressed this question a long time ago...regardless, the non-vario is unofficially set to 4/5 of the D5 vario.

    Wow...we went off on a tangent from submerged oil cooling...
  46. ortoklaz said:
    Yep as long as you have this MB you fine ,but you may want to upgrade so take this into consideration

    Yea awhile from now I'll consider upgrading. I kill myself to this day because I should've gotten an Intel board because I do lean more towards Nvidia cards (I love both companies, dont get me wrong :sweat: ). I just don't feel both comfortable using the hacked drivers to get SLI capabilities on an AMD board + how I generally can't use the latest drivers which may cause a system hang. But when it comes to the CPU waterblock I think I'll generally be ok. I can see someone easily running into a space issue on a smaller motherboard, and on larger ones, I would imagine that issue is somewhat more uncommon or rare.

    Now would any of you highly recommend replacing the stock MCP655 pump top with an aftermarket? I haven't really read a lot of people saying you should versus those with the MCP350/5. And does a fillport really make it a hell of a lot easier to fill/drain the system or is it just somewhat convenient? Those are pretty much the two last things I'm thinking about before I start to order bit by bit :D
  47. I have my 655/D5 stock.

    You can get a top or even a bay res that the pump can install in, but usually it's res/top or a bay/res/pump. Here are examples of both:

    http://www.frozencpu.com/products/11219/ex-res-232/XSPC_Dual_525_Bay_Reservoir_-_Laing_D5_MCP655_w_Blue_LED_Light_-_Clear_Silver_Black.html?tl=g30c107s152
    http://www.frozencpu.com/products/12360/ex-pmp-126/EK_D5_X-Res_Top_100_Pump_Top_Reservoir_Combo_-_Black_Acetal_EK-D5_X-RES_TOP_100_-_Black_Acetal.html?tl=g30c107s152

    I'm trying to figure out which one I am actually going to go with.
  48. I prefer the bigger XSPC one but that's just me + since its a bay reservoir. Either at that point it's if you want to see the reservoir or not lol

    I think I'll just stick with the stock top.
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