Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Sandforce vs NTFS-compressed mechanical drive

Tags:
  • SSD
  • Sandforce
  • NTFS
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
Share
December 16, 2010 4:53:44 PM

Hello,
I have just tested my NTFS-compressed mechanical drive using ATTO benchmark and I have got much better results than my Sandforce SSD.
1. Is ATTO overrated?
2. Is Sandforce overrated?

More about : sandforce ntfs compressed mechanical drive

a c 99 G Storage
December 16, 2010 6:37:37 PM

Are the SATA ports set to ACHI (if available) in BIOS?

What kind of numbers are you getting?

No HDD ever comes close to SSD. The best HDD I've seen posted 150MBps reads, but a Sandforce SSD should post 250+MBps reads.
m
0
l
December 16, 2010 9:07:57 PM

The setup:
- properly installed SSD (Win7, AHCI, latest Intel drivers, 4k aligned) divided into C: and D: partitions
- mechanical HDD as E: NTFS-compressed partition

The results in ATTO are
SSD: 265MB/s write and 280MB/s read (as expected)
HDD: an incredible 525MB/s write and 2700MB/s read

Now the result can be explained simply by the fact that in the HDD case the compression/decompression happens in the CPU/RAM and it is not subjected to SATAII controller bandwidth.

My point is that ATTO is irrelevant for Sandforce controllers.

I can come up with other benchmarks comparing the two drives.
I am also curious about NTFS-compressed Intel SSDs.

Sandforce's hardware compression has the advantage of accepting OS installations whereas NTFS-compressed partitions cannot.
Also Linux has no built-in compression.
m
0
l
Related resources
December 16, 2010 9:39:16 PM

Here is another one, CDM

SSD:
Seq 218 98
512K 210 100
4K 20 71
4K32 126 94

HDD:
Seq 103 104
512K 41 62
4K 0.6 1.44
4K32 1.5 1.44

This seems more like it.
m
0
l
a c 99 G Storage
December 17, 2010 1:17:51 AM

Whoa, those were some impressive numbers (2700MBps)! Glad you got it figured out!
m
0
l
a b G Storage
January 26, 2011 1:25:15 AM

HDDs can equal or best an SSD comfortably when it comes to sequential reads and writes, but it's the random reads and writes that a HDD can't keep up with. Although I've not seen how a compressed drive would handle it.
m
0
l
!